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February 7, 2014

Prep Your Pitch

On Thursday Feb 20 we will meet again to hear the pitches in MPAC 155.
Feel free to meet with other students to develop your idea, or work independently on an idea to pitch that day. Post ideas to the Brainstorm page on the blog. Run your ideas by Tom and Joellyn if you want feedback.

SHORT FILM PROJECT PITCH
Each student (or story team) will have 5 minutes to pitch an idea for a collaborative short film to the class. Prepare an enthusiastic and engaging presentation of an idea for a film you would like to work on. Follow the checklist of points to cover in your pitch. Please keep your pitch under 5 minutes. Your pitch must offer an idea that is realistic within the timeline, technical tools, and financial limitations of our class. Each story idea must integrate the GLASS as a visual element into the film. Stories may also integrate Glensheen as a shoot location. Films can be shot in multiple locations, but be realistic about the time it takes to plan and shoot. Each film idea must have clear roles for 2 or 3 actors, offering them a chance to bring their character to life through closeups, actions and emotions that fit your story. Scripts will be developed and refined to include speaking lines for each of the actors.

Make sure you include this info in your Pitch.

WORKING PROJECT TITLE:
TEASER:

GENRE / STYLE:

STORY / PLOT:

SHOOT LOCATIONS:

CHARACTER # 1 / DESCRIPTION :

CHARACTER # 2 / DESCRIPTION :

CHARACTER # 3 / DESCRIPTION :

OPTIONAL CHARACTERS / Extras:

VISUAL PLAN: (optional, bring printed images of locations to support your pitch)

SPECIAL EFFECTS or TECHNIQUES you plan to use:

SCHEDULING ISSUES times of day you prefer to shoot:


Suggested / Pitch Checklist

Teaser Pitch
Story Pitch
Optional Visual Plan (5 - 10 images to show during your pitch)
Outline or Script (optional)

1. Teaser Pitch starts off with the hook of the story. You have to sum up the storyline of your idea in around 25 words or less. In the teaser pitch, the first sentence introduces the characters, the next sentence illustrates their conflict, and the final sentence can allude to the genre or visual style and leaves listeners wanting more.

2. Story Pitch is much longer than the teaser pitch, but still try to keep it short. The story pitch starts with your hook and then you run down the rest of the story. Be sure to articulate those crucial elements ... the heroes, their goals, the conflict, what's at risk and why they're fighting to save it, any pivotal events or emotional turning points, and the conclusion. Your story pitch for your short film idea can be less than 200 words.
Keep it simple.

3. OPTIONAL: Visual Plan is where you give us a sense of your cinematic storytelling sensibility. Show us some images (image stills, location shots, storyboards, color swatches, etc). You can show a few images from existing films as examples, but you must also show us some original images. This is where you need to express your aesthetic choices and the overall visual style of the proposed project. Bring prints to share during your pitch.

4. Script (also Optional at this time) Prepare an outline of the plot or key shots that will makeup the short film. The film can be very visual, but it must also include dialog. An outline of the main action and key shots is all that is needed for this short pitch. A more complete shotlist and / or screen play will be generated if your idea gets selected. Don't plan to read a script during the pitch, simply
outline the key moments in the plot.

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Students will vote on their favorite ideas after all the pitches.
We will do our best to select an interesting range of projects to go into script development and production.
Tom will have final say on casting. Joellyn will have final say on film crews.
Teams will include about 3 filmmaking students and 2 acting students for each project.

February 18, 2009

Pitch Links

FILM PITCH RESOURCES
A good pitch is generally between five and ten minutes long and lays out the premise, hook and essential beats of the story, along with thumbnail sketches of the principal characters (often including the names of actors who might play the roles), and a clear idea of the genre, tone, likely audience, and budget level.

Pitches come in two forms: the two-minute pitch, also known as the teaser, and the story pitch

Here is some background info that will be useful for your future assignment

links below

Continue reading "Pitch Links" »