September 2009 Archives

Upcoming workshop on Lit Review

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I am co-presenting this Friday.
Love to see you there. We will also be recording this session if you can't make it. Let me know and I can send you the recording.


Researching and Writing the Literature Review--Content and Process

Friday, October 2, 2009
Time: 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Location: 1-106 Hanson Hall
Map: http://www1.umn.edu/twincities/maps/HMH/HMH-map.html

This workshop will focus on framing the literature review in the
context of the thesis or dissertation; narrowing the research scope;
searching for and organizing the materials; knowing when you are
done and resources available.

Presenters:
Dr. Scott Slattery, University Counseling and Consulting Services
Kate Peterson, University Libraries

Click below to register
http://www.grad.umn.edu/career/workshops/register.asp?id=212

changes in thought through editions

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origin.jpg

Data visualization is an interesting field when applied to texts. Here is an example using the Origins of Species...

Take a look: http://benfry.com/traces/

"We often think of scientific ideas, such as Darwin's theory of evolution, as fixed notions that are accepted as finished. In fact, Darwin's On the Origin of Species evolved over the course of several editions he wrote, edited, and updated during his lifetime. The first English edition was approximately 150,000 words and the sixth is a much larger 190,000 words. In the changes are refinements and shifts in ideas -- whether increasing the weight of a statement, adding details, or even a change in the idea itself."

"The idea that we can actually see change over time in a person's thinking is fascinating. Darwin scholars are of course familiar with this story, but here we can view it directly, both on a macro-level as it animates, or word-by-word as we examine pieces of the text more closely." (from http://benfry.com/writing/archives/529)

Banned Book Week

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Take a look at the Banned Book Mapbannedbook_map.jpg which gives both location and book that was challenged.

The 10 most challenged titles were:

And Tango Makes Three, by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell
Reasons: anti-ethnic, anti-family, homosexuality, religious viewpoint,and unsuited to age group

His Dark Materials trilogy, by Philip Pullman
Reasons: political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, and violence

TTYL; TTFN; L8R, G8R (series), by Lauren Myracle
Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited to age group

Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
Reasons: occult/satanism, religious viewpoint, and violence

Bless Me, Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
Reasons: occult/satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, and violence

The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
Reasons: drugs, homosexuality, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit, suicide, and unsuited to age group

Gossip Girl (series), by Cecily von Ziegesar
Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited to age group

Uncle Bobby's Wedding, by Sarah S. Brannen
Reasons: homosexuality and unsuited to age group

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini
Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited to age group

Flashcards of My Life, by Charise Mericle Harper
Reasons: sexually explicit and unsuited to age group

And to complete the celebration of Banned Books Week--Puppets!

Library exhibit: Travel drawings

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travel_sketch.jpgDewey Thorbeck, of the award-winning firm Thorbeck Architects Ltd, is the founder and program director for the University of Minnesota's Center for Rural Design, partially funded by the State Legislature and sponsored by the College of Design, the College of Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resource Sciences.

Early in his career, Thorbeck received the Rome Prize Fellowship to the American Academy in Rome and travelled extensively throughout Italy and Europe. Since then he has travelled all over the world - including the village of Machu Picchu in Peru, the Lofoten Islands of Norway, Shanghai in China, and San Miguel de Allende, Mexico - to sketch places that he finds have a strong and close integration of architecture and landscape. He states that, "To me the most beautiful places in the world are those that express this connection in a profoundly human way."

Thorbeck's sketches brightly, sweetly, and energetically tell stories about places, people, and culture. They are windows to the world that invite visual exploration of how people live in their environs. Currently at work on a book, Architect's Travel Sketches: A visual review of human and natural landscapes, Thorbeck will illustrate his views of the world as an architect, teacher and researcher.

Exhibit: September 25-December 27, 2009

Opening Reception October 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Architecture & Landscape Architecture Library

Learn more: http://staff.lib.umn.edu/communications/email/2009/architecture10/

Library Workshops for Fall are filling up fast

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To register go to: http://www.lib.umn.edu/services/workshops/registration

Here are a few of my recommendations:

Zotero: Basics
Zotero is a *free* Firefox extension that helps you collect citations and website information from within your Firefox browser. We'll show you how to install Zotero and use it to capture citations, organize your research, and format bibliographies and in-text citations.
Time: Wednesday, 9/23/2009 - 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Location: Walter Library 310

Creating Posters Using PowerPoint
Getting ready to do a poster at an upcoming conference? Learn pointers about using PowerPoint to create the poster as one giant slide, and send it to a large-scale printer.
Time: Monday, 09/28/2009 - 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Formatting Your Dissertation or Thesis in *Word 2007*
Focus on your research instead of your formatting! In this workshop, you'll learn how to use Microsoft Word features effectively and efficiently. We'll cover inserting images and charts, getting your page numbers in the right place, generating tables of contents and figures; and more. Please note that this workshop covers the basic formatting you'll need to comply with Graduate School guidelines. For advanced formatting questions, please consult the Writing Center. Participants should have basic experience using MS Word. Note this version of the workshop specifically uses Office 2007; an instruction manual is available for Word 2003. We will be using a template and not be working with individual dissertations. Class materials can be found on the Moodle page, at: https://moodle.umn.edu/course/view.php?id=5102
Time: Monday, 10/05/2009 - 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Introduction to Citation Managers
Learn why you should use a citation manager. This workshop will look at 3 common citation managers, RefWorks, EndNote and Zotero. Their features will be compared so you can decide which citation manager best meets your needs.
Time: Tuesday, 10/06/2009 - 11:15am - 12:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Getting Published: How to Publish Your Science Research Article
This workshop, intended for graduate students and newer faculty in the sciences, will help you identify appropriate journals to which to submit your article and discuss how to manage your rights when signing a contract with a publisher. Join your colleagues to share your ideas and discuss the issues you face as an emerging academic author.
Time: Monday, 10/19/2009 - 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Google for Researchers
With Google, you already search the web, share photos/movies/music, map directions and discover new things...but there are some tools you may have missed. This web search engine is on a mission to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible." So let's explore the new tools and technology that pair Google-efficient tools with library-quality results to weave together a rich information web that goes beyond just the World Wide Web. We'll look at tools such as, Google Docs, RSS Reader, Google Scholar, and iGoogle Research Gadgets that will help you access, evaluate, and share information in an easy collaborative environment.
Time: Thursday, 10/22/2009 - 10:00am - 11:00am
Location: 310 Walter Library

Grant Funding for Graduate Students
Find out more about funding opportunities available to graduate students. Learn how to use IRIS, SPIN, and Community of Science and the Foundation Directory to search for grant opportunities. Setting up e-mail updates on specific subjects will also be covered, as well as how to find internal U of M funding sources. Resources for the course are listed on the Web site of the Office of the VP for Research, http://www.collaborate.umn.edu/explore/searching.html.
Time: Wednesday, 11/04/2009 - 3:00pm - 4:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Let me know if you have questions.

Peer Research Consultants

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I included this information in a post last week but it was so important that I have decided to include it in its own post...


Peer Research Consultants (Pilot) Program **NEW**
The University Libraries, Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence (MCAE), and SMART Learning Commons have come together to pilot a program of providing peer tutors for students on library and academic research--specifically First Year Writing students. PRCs have completed WRIT 1301 and will receive extensive training in library research, information literacy, tutoring and cultural competencies. We have hired three students for Fall and they will be available for one-on-one appointments and drop-ins in early October at the SMART Learning Commons and MCAE. I will send more information about times and locations soon. PRC can help students with:
--Selecting and narrowing a topic
--Finding Books and articles
--Finding scholarly articles
--Evaluating sources
--Basic citation creation

More information coming soon....

@ Wilson Reference Desk

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I am now one of the librarians behind the first floor reference desk at Wilson Library. My shift is from 11 to 12:30 on Fridays, so please stop by and say hello if you are in the area. I will be the librarian slighly overwhelmed by all the questions...

Resources for FYW

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Wilson_reference.jpgOur goal is to provide first year students the fundamental library and information literacy skills needed to help students succeed in first year writing and beyond. We teach students to efficiently find and evaluate academic and popular sources to use in their writing. Here are a number of resources available to support you and to help ensure your students learn how to do academic research:

1.) Incorporate Unravel the Library workshops into your FYW class.
Online Unravel the Library 2: Finding Scholarly Articles (http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/unravel.html):
Require students to take this online tutorial either in-class or on their own time (takes about 45 minutes). Students take a quiz and can print out the results to turn in to you--points or extra credit can be given. Here are the Unravel 2: Finding Scholarly Articles learning outcomes:
--Identify appropriate article indexes and use them to find articles
--use search techniques to find articles for their topic
--identify whether an article is considered scholarly or not.

Face-to-face Unravel the Library 1, 2 or 3 (https://www.lib.umn.edu/services/workshops/registration):
These sessions are held at various times throughout the semester. Students can be required to attend specific workshops. Students can get a certificate to turn in to you (signed by the librarian) for points or extra credit.

Unravel 1: Orientation & Tour of Wilson Library learning outcomes: Orientation to services and resources available through the Libraries, how to read a book and article citation, how to locate books and articles from a citation, Tour of Wilson Library.

Unravel 2: Finding Scholarly Articles learning outcomes: Identify appropriate article indexes and use them to find articles, use search techniques to find article for their topic, identify whether an article is considered scholarly or not.

Unravel 3: Advanced Searching learning outcomes: Construct a simple search strategy, use advanced searching such as field searching, limiting, truncation and Boolean operators

Next steps for you:

1. Assign Unravel 2 Online (give students this URL: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/unravel.html). Instruct students to take the four Unravel modules and take the quiz. Students can then print out the quiz and turn in to you. They can log in at any time to access quiz results.

OR

2. Assign Unravel the Library Face-to-Face workshop by a given date. Instruct students to register for an Unravel 1, 2 or 3 workshop convenient for them at https://www.lib.umn.edu/services/workshops/registration.

2.) Peer Research Consultants (Pilot) Program **NEW**
The University Libraries, Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence (MCAE), and SMART Learning Commons have come together to pilot a program of providing peer tutors for students on library and academic research--specifically First Year Writing students. PRCs have completed WRIT 1301 and will receive extensive training in library research, information literacy, tutoring and cultural competencies. We have hired three students for Fall and they will be available for one-on-one appointments and drop-ins in early October at the SMART Learning Commons and MCAE. I will send more information about times and locations soon. PRC can help students with:
--Selecting and narrowing a topic
--Finding Books and articles
--Finding scholarly articles
--Evaluating sources
--Basic citation creation

3.) CourseLib page of library resources for Students (general or get your own customized page)
We have created CourseLib guides which act as a head start for students doing research:

* WRIT 1201: Writing Studio CourseLib page for students
* WRIT 1301: University Writing (all) CourseLib page for students
* WRIT 1401: Writing and Academic Inquiry (all) CourseLib page for students

To get your own page customized for your course topics, just email katep@umn.edu

4.) FYW Instructor's Guide to the Libraries (http://courses.lib.umn.edu/page.phtml?page_id=2789)
Find links and assignments that can be added to your course to help students learn skills to effectively find articles and other library resources

5.) Writing Studies & the University Libraries Blog (http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/)
Read about news, events and ideas from the crossroads of Writing and Library Research.

6.) Chat with a Librarian now available 24/7!

Click on "chat" in upper left hand corner of Library homepage

Have questions? Let me know:
Kate Peterson--YOUR librarian
Contact me with any questions, comments, purchase requests (books, journals), research help, etc. I can come to your office for a one-on-one consultation.
Contact me: katep@umn.edu, 612-626-3746, Walter Library 239
IM: katethegreatmpls, Twitter: kategreatmpls
Writing Studies & University Libraries blog: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/

Students talk about the Libraries

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Brody to speak on "Cookbook for Eternity"

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brody.jpgThursday, October 1, 2009
7:30 p.m. presentation followed by dessert reception and book signing
Cargill Building
1500 Gortner Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55108
Limited seating; reservations requested by September 24 at 612-624-9339 or stangret@umn.edu.

Jane Brody joined The New York Times as a specialist in medicine and biology in 1965 after completing degrees in biochemistry and science writing at The New York State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin School of Journalism, respectively, and a two-year stint as a reporter for the Minneapolis Tribune. Brody is the author of numerous books, including two best sellers, Jane Brody's Nutrition Book and Jane Brody's Good Food Book. Her most recent book, Jane Brody's Guide to the Great Beyond, is a "complete guide to everything you need to know--emotionally, spiritually, and practically--to prepare for the end of life."

More at: http://staff.lib.umn.edu/communications/email/2009/brody/index.html

future of libraries

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Where are libraries headed? This topic is much talked about both within and outside of professional circles. Here is a recent article discussing some of the issues.

The future of libraries, with or without books (CNN)

"...many real-world libraries are moving forward with the assumption that physical books will play a much-diminished or potentially nonexistent role in their efforts to educate the public.

Some books will still be around, they say, although many of those will be digital. But the goal of the library remains the same: To be a free place where people can access and share information."

"... This shift means the role of the librarian -- and their look -- is also changing.

In a world where information is more social and more online, librarians are becoming debate moderators, givers of technical support and community outreach coordinators."

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walter_study2.jpgA group I am chairing within the Libraries, the Information Literacy Collaborative, is pleased to announce that we will be working with a group from this year's cohort of the President's Emerging Leader's (PEL) program (http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/pel/index.html).

As part of the PEL program, participants work on a project designed to address essential strategic questions facing the University. Project proposals are submitted from across the University, and our project, "Teaching 21st Century Literacies Through the University Libraries to Support the Undergraduate Experience" was selected.

Here is some background

Are our students prepared to live and work as digital citizens in the Knowledge Age? Are our students prepared to be lifelong learners? There is a set of skills that cross disciplines and departments on campus, often referred to as 21st century literacies. It includes:
• Information literacy (ability to find, evaluate, organize and use information to inform and solve problems)
• Media literacy (ability to question, analyze, interpret, evaluate, and create media messages)
• Visual literacy (ability to understand and produce visual messages)
• Digital literacy (ability to use digital technology, communications tools or networks to locate, evaluate use and create information)
• Statistical literacy (ability to analyze and understand data to produce meaningful information)
These skills are vital to academic and professional success. They help students adapt and thrive in the changing landscape of information, media and technology on the road of lifelong learning. They need to be taught and reinforced throughout a student's life at the University both within and outside of the classroom.

more coming soon...

Writing Studies-Library Orientation

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Today I am presenting and teaching a couple of sessions along with the Writing Studies Instructors Orientation.

**Library Tools for Teaching (with Shannon Klug)

**Library Research Beyond Google (with guest Professor Don Ross)

**Library Handout (Best 14 for Writing Studies)

Please let me know if you have any questions!
Thanks,
Kate