Recently in FirstYearWriting Category

Handouts and Videos from FYW Orientation

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Welcome to Fall semester. Here are some materials from last week... prc_flyer.jpg


Library Tools for Teaching from August 27, 2012
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/LibraryToolsforTeaching_Fall2012.pdf


Selecting the Right Number of Keywords:

Hands-on session for new FYW on August 30, 2012:
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/First%20Year%20Writing%20Instructors%20Orientation_Fall2012.pdf

What is a scholarly article?


Library Support for FYW on August 31 with all FYW Instructors
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/FYW_Orientation_handout_8_31_2012.pdf

They Say I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing handout (ties "templates" with research ideas)
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/They%20Say%20I%20Say_Research.pdf

Explore a Topic handout:
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/ExploringTopic_ResearchQuestion_Handout_June2011.doc

Continuum: Magazine of the University of Minnesota Libraries

Used Car Salesman--Library Databases:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=llD1AY5fsjc&feature=share&list=UUZsL8mSjDJlIuQ8oKLKvGIA

The Information Cycle:

Fall 2011--First Year Writing Resources

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Handout from Sept. 2nd session: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/FYW_LibrariesInfo_9_2_2011.pdf
They Say/I Say Research handout: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/They%20Say%20I%20Say_Research.doc
Conclusions from Project Information Literacy research on how students conduct research in the digital age (Fall 2010): http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/PIL_Fall2010_Survey_Conclusions_Handout.pdf
Libraries for Faculty and Instructors handout: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/Faculty_Orientation_E_Handout_2011_FINAL.pdf


Links for teaching First Year Writing:
Intro to Library Research: http://www.lib.umn.edu/introtolibraryresearch
Peer Research Consultants: http://www.lib.umn.edu/services/prc
Library Course Page for WRIT 1301: http://www.lib.umn.edu/course/WRIT/1301

Fun videos to reinforce/introduce academic research concepts:

Scholarly vs. Popular
http://vimeo.com/21759715

Why citation is important
http://vimeo.com/21758525

Study like a Scholar

Writing and First Year Writing Instructor Orientations

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It was a busy week of orientation. I wanted to share all of the various PPTs and handouts. Please use as needed.

Monday, August 30-Library Tools for Teaching

Wednesday, September 1--New FYW instructors


Project Information Literacy: Frustrations

Friday, September 3--All FYW instructors

Study Like a Scholar:

Please let me know if you have any questions or would like to discuss how the Libraries can support your teaching (or research)!
katep@umn.edu
612-626-3746
Walter Library 239

Event: Writing English in Translation

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Members of the Literacy & Rhetorical Studies and Center for Writing communities,

Please join us for the Literacy & Rhetorical Studies Speaker Series

"Writing English in Translation: ELF, World Englishes, and Diversalité"
Dr. Bruce Horner
Endowed Chair in Rhetoric and Composition
University of Louisville

Monday, March 29th, 2010
2:30 - 4:00 pm
135 Nicholson Hall


Bruce Horner is Endowed Chair in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Louisville, where he teaches courses in composition, composition theory and pedagogy, and literacy studies. His books include the co-edited Cross-Language Relations in Composition (Southern Illinois UP, forthcoming); Terms of Work for Composition: A Materialist Critique, winner of the W. Ross Winterowd Award for Composition Theory; Key Terms in Popular Music and Culture, co-edited with Thomas Swiss; and, co-authored with Min-Zhan Lu, Representing the "Other": Basic Writers and the Teaching of Basic Writing and Writing Conventions. "English Only and U.S. College Composition," an essay he co-authored with John Trimbur, is the recipient of the Richard Braddock Award. His recent work examines the implications of scholarship on world Englishes and English as a lingua franca for the teaching of writing.

The interdisciplinary graduate minor in Literacy and Rhetorical Studies (housed in the Center for Writing) sponsors the Speaker Series to engage faculty and graduate students in rich discussions about the uses of language, reading, and writing. Information about past and present Speaker Series events is available at writing.umn.edu/lrs.

Dr. Horner's talk is also sponsored by the Department of Writing Studies, the First-Year Writing Program, and the Literacy Education Research Series, with additional support from the University of Minnesota's programs in Post-Secondary Teaching and Learning and in Second Languages and Cultures.

Article on research

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usnews.jpg

Writing a Paper? Try These 7 Research Tips
February 10, 2010 05:39 PM ET | Lynn F. Jacobs, Jeremy S. Hyman
http://www.usnews.com/blogs/professors-guide/2010/02/10/writing-a-paper-try-these-7-research-tips.html

Once in a while you get hit with it: the 15- to 25-page research paper, also called the term paper or semester project. This is your chance to join the community of the 20 percent or so of college professors who are actually doing research. How do they do it? And how can you? Have a look at our seven best tips for doing research like a professor:

1. Start from where you are.
2. Think E.
3. Discover WorldCat.
4. Learn the shortcuts.
5. Use the resources that live and breathe.
6. Learn about ILL.
7. Look for "gateway" sources.

PRC Open Houses

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PRC Open House
Come and meet the Peer Research Consultants and talk to Jody Gray and Kate Peterson about this program at this open house. Please encourage all staff to stop by.
When: February 22, 2009 12:30pm-1:30pm
Where: Wilson Library S30A

When: March 1, 2010 12:30pm-1:30pm
Where: Appleby 169

The Peer Research Consultants (PRC) program's goal is to support FYW students as they do library research and find sources to use in their writing. Your students can sit down one-on-one and get personalized research help on their topics. The PRCs build on skills learned in the Unravel the Library workshops.
For more information visit: http://www.lib.umn.edu/services/prc.

PRCs available for spring

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PRC_ad_UGVL.jpgDo you have a student who need extra help with research? Do you have any students who complain they can't find any sources? Do some of your students bibliographies not meet your expectations? Please talk to your students about the Peer Research Consultants (PRC) program. The program's goal is to support FYW students as they do library research and find sources to use in their writing. Your students can sit down one-on-one and get personalized research help on their topics. The PRCs build on skills learned in the Unravel the Library workshops.

New for spring:

*Evening drop-in hours available Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays with daily drop-in hours Monday-Friday in Wilson Library, Walter Library, and Appleby Hall.
*Students can get a certificate to show they have worked with the PRCs. This can be useful for giving points or extra credit.
*Like last semester, the PRCs are available for class visits and/or we can send you fliers for class distribution.

How many students were seen in fall?

*The PRCs met with over 60 students in fall semester-this exceeded our estimates for this new program.
*Over 60% of students were in WRIT 1301 and 3% from WRIT 1201
*In general, students met with PRCs for over 30 minutes for in-depth guidance

What did students have to say about the PRCs?
Here are some quotes from students this fall:

*"She was very helpful when I was looking for specific information on the library website. She explained the website very well and gave excellent tips!"
*"He was very helpful in helping me figure out what I wanted to write my paper on and where I could find the sources. Afterwards I was able to understand my paper."
*"Approachable advising that assisted me with furthering my research goals; very useful."

How do students find out about the PRCs?

*From you--their class instructors. Over 50% of the students heard about the program from FYW instructors.

For more information visit: http://www.lib.umn.edu/services/prc. The PRCs are also linked from the Undergraduate Virtual Library (http://www.lib.umn.edu/undergrad/).

Unravel the Library workshops for First Year Writing

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unravel_lgog.jpg

Challenges - Realities of student research skills:

  • Many students have used Google/Wikipedia to find information/sources for the majority of their papers in high school and they have gotten A's.
  • Students have a wide range of experience with library research (budget cuts in the last 10 years have affected the number of media specialists and librarians in Minnesota's school libraries).
  • First year students can suffer from "library anxiety" including feelings of inadequacy, intimidation, and extreme reluctance with asking for help which all lead to procrastination.
  • The University Libraries, websites, and tools are complex.

Solutions - Unravel the Library Workshops

Include Unravel the Library workshops into your class to help your students learn to use the Library and to find academic sources. We offer two ways to do this:

1. Online Unravel the Library 2: Finding Scholarly Articles
Require students to take this online tutorial either in-class or on their own time (takes about 45 minutes). Students take a quiz and can print it to turn in to you for credit or extra credit.

2. Face-to-Face Unravel the Library 1, 2, or 3
These sessions are held at various times throughout the semester. Students can be required to attend specific workshops by a given date. Students get a certificate to turn in to you for credit or extra credit. Learn more about the content of each of these at about Unravel the Library.

Next Steps for You:

1. Include one of the Unravel the Library workshops into your syllabi and course.
2. Contact me with any questions (Kate Peterson, liaison to Writing Studies at katep@umn.edu or 612-626-3746).

Assignment Idea: Sherlock Holmes

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holmes.jpg
Have you seen the movie? Did you know the University of Minnesota has over 60,000 items related to Sherlock Holmes? You could have students analyze the letters and other items--what do they say? What do they mean?

Learn more: http://special.lib.umn.edu/rare/holmes.phtml

FYW blog

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fyw_blog.jpg
Write or Wrong: Does Technology Benefit the Writing Process?
First Year Writing students at the U of M reflect on successful academic writing in the age of new media
http://blog.lib.umn.edu/grif0167/write_or%20wrong/

fgi.jpgIn response to a recent blog post and story on said blog post in Inside Higher Ed (Furor Over Anti-Gay Blog) our data services librarian, Amy West, broken down his arguments and supported counterclaims with data (In response to the "Economic case against homosexuality").

This would be a good model for students to break down an argument paragraph by paragraph and systematically give counter points with evidence. It also would help students learn how to use arguments that go against their own viewpoints effectively. We often talk to studnets who are only looking for information at support their own viewpoints--getting them into arguments in this manner may help.

PRCs on MyU for undergrads

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Selecting a topic...
This used to be one of the steps in the research process that I would breeze over--mention that students should select a topic they are interested in and then go right into keywords and finding sources. A couple of weeks ago I co-lead a session on research and writing and I have now been rethinking this attitude.

I realize there are many challenges in picking a topic--especially for first year students or those new to a discipline:
--might not know enough background information
--might not know how to identify or narrow a topic by different facets of a topic
--don't want to spend time researching a dumb topic (but don't know it might be dumb until they do searching)
--don't know any good journals or authors on the topic
--topic selection is very personal and reflects on them (FY students often want to make "safe" choices) to the other students in the class

If I was asked to do a paper on an engineering topic or on greek history (two things I don't know much about) it would be very difficult. Certainly harder when you add in procrastination.

One idea is to create research communitites. Group students based on their initial topic or even assign broad topic areas (e.g. higher education, sports, history, local issues, gender issues, etc.). Ask this group to collaborate on their preliminary research--maybe create a group concept map [learn more] on the broad topic. Ask them to help narrow their topics and connect those in the concept map.

Later on this research community can share how they are doing research and where are they successful finding sources.

This ideas recreates the same research communities that most faculty and instructors are involved in. Your peers and other sholars form both a formal and informal community--we take this for granted.

Are you involved with a research community? What do you gain from it? How can you recreate such things in your class?

Help your students research their way to an A!

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prc_graphic.jpgWe are pleased to announce the availability of the Peer Research Consultants. Please encourage your students to drop in for one-on-one help with their research. Students can get help narrowing a topic, finding articles and books, selecting academic sources, evaluating and more. The PRCs are familiar with the Unravel workshops and will help build on the skills learned in these sessions. The PRCs are focused on teaching students as they help them with their research questions.

For Fall 2009, during our pilot phase, we are concentrating on supporting First Year Writing (all of the PRCs have completed WRIT 1301 with a grade of B or higher), SEAM (Student Excellence in Academics and Multiculturalism) and as part of MCAE's Academic Resources.

Fall 2009 Walk-in Hours:
Monday: 10:30 to 1:30 (Walter Library-SMART Commons)

Tuesday: 1:30 to 4:30 (Wilson Library-SMART Commons)

Wednesday: 1:30 to 3:00 (Walter Library-SMART Commons)
1:30 to 2:30 (MCAE in Appleby Hall)

Thursday: 12:00 to 2:00 (MCAE in Appleby Hall)

Friday: 1:30 to 4:00 (Wilson Library-SMART Commons)
1:30 to 4:30 (Walter Library-SMART Commons)

Students can drop in during walk-in hours without an appointment. If students would like to make an appointment they can be arranged directly with our consultants. For more information and to meet our consultants go to the PRC website: http://www.lib.umn.edu/services/prc or blog: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/ceslib/prc/.

If you are interested in print flyers, please let us know (grayjl@umn.edu or katep@umn.edu) and we will send enough for your class through campus mail. The PRCs are also available for short class visits (around 5 minutes) to promote their services--If you are interested, let us know (grayjl@umn.edu or katep@umn.edu) and we can schedule.

This program was developed in partnership with the University Libraries, MCAE: Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence and the SMART Learning Commons.

Peer Research Consultants

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I included this information in a post last week but it was so important that I have decided to include it in its own post...


Peer Research Consultants (Pilot) Program **NEW**
The University Libraries, Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence (MCAE), and SMART Learning Commons have come together to pilot a program of providing peer tutors for students on library and academic research--specifically First Year Writing students. PRCs have completed WRIT 1301 and will receive extensive training in library research, information literacy, tutoring and cultural competencies. We have hired three students for Fall and they will be available for one-on-one appointments and drop-ins in early October at the SMART Learning Commons and MCAE. I will send more information about times and locations soon. PRC can help students with:
--Selecting and narrowing a topic
--Finding Books and articles
--Finding scholarly articles
--Evaluating sources
--Basic citation creation

More information coming soon....

Resources for FYW

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Wilson_reference.jpgOur goal is to provide first year students the fundamental library and information literacy skills needed to help students succeed in first year writing and beyond. We teach students to efficiently find and evaluate academic and popular sources to use in their writing. Here are a number of resources available to support you and to help ensure your students learn how to do academic research:

1.) Incorporate Unravel the Library workshops into your FYW class.
Online Unravel the Library 2: Finding Scholarly Articles (http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/unravel.html):
Require students to take this online tutorial either in-class or on their own time (takes about 45 minutes). Students take a quiz and can print out the results to turn in to you--points or extra credit can be given. Here are the Unravel 2: Finding Scholarly Articles learning outcomes:
--Identify appropriate article indexes and use them to find articles
--use search techniques to find articles for their topic
--identify whether an article is considered scholarly or not.

Face-to-face Unravel the Library 1, 2 or 3 (https://www.lib.umn.edu/services/workshops/registration):
These sessions are held at various times throughout the semester. Students can be required to attend specific workshops. Students can get a certificate to turn in to you (signed by the librarian) for points or extra credit.

Unravel 1: Orientation & Tour of Wilson Library learning outcomes: Orientation to services and resources available through the Libraries, how to read a book and article citation, how to locate books and articles from a citation, Tour of Wilson Library.

Unravel 2: Finding Scholarly Articles learning outcomes: Identify appropriate article indexes and use them to find articles, use search techniques to find article for their topic, identify whether an article is considered scholarly or not.

Unravel 3: Advanced Searching learning outcomes: Construct a simple search strategy, use advanced searching such as field searching, limiting, truncation and Boolean operators

Next steps for you:

1. Assign Unravel 2 Online (give students this URL: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/unravel.html). Instruct students to take the four Unravel modules and take the quiz. Students can then print out the quiz and turn in to you. They can log in at any time to access quiz results.

OR

2. Assign Unravel the Library Face-to-Face workshop by a given date. Instruct students to register for an Unravel 1, 2 or 3 workshop convenient for them at https://www.lib.umn.edu/services/workshops/registration.

2.) Peer Research Consultants (Pilot) Program **NEW**
The University Libraries, Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence (MCAE), and SMART Learning Commons have come together to pilot a program of providing peer tutors for students on library and academic research--specifically First Year Writing students. PRCs have completed WRIT 1301 and will receive extensive training in library research, information literacy, tutoring and cultural competencies. We have hired three students for Fall and they will be available for one-on-one appointments and drop-ins in early October at the SMART Learning Commons and MCAE. I will send more information about times and locations soon. PRC can help students with:
--Selecting and narrowing a topic
--Finding Books and articles
--Finding scholarly articles
--Evaluating sources
--Basic citation creation

3.) CourseLib page of library resources for Students (general or get your own customized page)
We have created CourseLib guides which act as a head start for students doing research:

* WRIT 1201: Writing Studio CourseLib page for students
* WRIT 1301: University Writing (all) CourseLib page for students
* WRIT 1401: Writing and Academic Inquiry (all) CourseLib page for students

To get your own page customized for your course topics, just email katep@umn.edu

4.) FYW Instructor's Guide to the Libraries (http://courses.lib.umn.edu/page.phtml?page_id=2789)
Find links and assignments that can be added to your course to help students learn skills to effectively find articles and other library resources

5.) Writing Studies & the University Libraries Blog (http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/)
Read about news, events and ideas from the crossroads of Writing and Library Research.

6.) Chat with a Librarian now available 24/7!

Click on "chat" in upper left hand corner of Library homepage

Have questions? Let me know:
Kate Peterson--YOUR librarian
Contact me with any questions, comments, purchase requests (books, journals), research help, etc. I can come to your office for a one-on-one consultation.
Contact me: katep@umn.edu, 612-626-3746, Walter Library 239
IM: katethegreatmpls, Twitter: kategreatmpls
Writing Studies & University Libraries blog: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/katep/infolit/

Writing Studies-Library Orientation

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Today I am presenting and teaching a couple of sessions along with the Writing Studies Instructors Orientation.

**Library Tools for Teaching (with Shannon Klug)

**Library Research Beyond Google (with guest Professor Don Ross)

**Library Handout (Best 14 for Writing Studies)

Please let me know if you have any questions!
Thanks,
Kate

Assignment: Baloney Detection Kit

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Have student watch the following:

  1. How reliable is the source of the claim?
  2. Does teh wources make similar claims?
  3. Has the claims been verified by somebody else?
  4. Does this fit with the way the world works?
  5. Has anyone tried to disprove the claim?
  6. Where does the preponderance of evidence point?
  7. Is the claimant playing by the rules of science?
  8. Is the claimant providing positive evidence?
  9. Does the new theory account for as many phenomena as the old theory?
  10. Are personal beliefs driving the claim?


Then have students create a class Baloney Detection Kit--basically criteria for evaluating information and evidence they use in the class. Post this in the class site and ask students to find two sources (one credible, one not so credible or one website and one newspaper, or one .org and .gov) and apply the detection kit.


Penn puts a new spin on the freshman project

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"Incoming freshmen to the University of Pennsylvania, as at many schools across the country,painting.jpg typically start their college careers reading a common book and then discussing it - an orientation activity meant to unify the class.

This fall, the 19-year-old project takes a new twist at Penn: Students will study and discuss a painting, Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic.

Penn officials said they think they are the first to use a painting for the orientation project, and national officials knew of no other school.

The university is changing its approach as part of a new campaign it will officially launch next month, called "Arts & The City Year."

In addition to the orientation project, Penn plans "arts crawls" around the city, and an arts "passport" to art and cultural institutions with discounts and prizes for students. An "art in public health" series, arts seminars, and a variety of other programs also are planned to put students more in touch with the art venues on campus and around the region."

Read more: http://www.philly.com/inquirer/home_top_stories/20090811_Penn_puts_a_new_spin_on_the_freshman_project.html

Top 5 citation apps

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How do you organize your research? There are more and more tools to help:

from http://instructify.com/2009/07/16/top-5-citation-applications/:
1. BibMe
2. Citation Machine
3. EasyBib
4. OttoBib
5. Word 2007

Check our our new comparison chart of the citation managers recommended through the libraries: Introduction to Citation Managers Chart

Let me know if you have more questions!

First Year Writing and the Library

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Here are some highlights from a draft report on FYW and the Library:

  • After piloting Unravel the Library 2: Finding Scholarly Articles online tutorial in late spring and summer 2008, we rolled out the session in fall. We used Moodle to administer the quiz in both the Face-to-Face and online environments.
  • Overall, in 2008-09 we increased the number of students we taught with the Unravels series by about 30%.
  • We saw good acceptance for the online modules: about 50% of students that completed Unravel 2 took the online version.
  • The average quiz scores in Unravel 2 were between 85% and 87% overall. We define a score of 80% and above as successful thus student learning was achieved in both the face-to-face and online sessions.
  • We need to increase tracking of who is completing the Unravel the Library workshops to better assess how well we are reaching First Year Writing students.

Read the entire report here: FYW_Library_Report_Fall08_Spring09_2.doc

unravel_attendance.jpg


Assignment idea: Rating the news

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I tripped across Health New Review: http://www.healthnewsreview.org/ (published by Gary Schwitzer
Associate Professor, University of Minnesota School of Journalism & Mass Communication, Health Journalism MA program).healthnews.jpg

I think the site itself is great but how about modifying this for a class project? Have students find materials on the class topic and then rate and evaluate what they find. I think the star rating system would help student begin to build a mental spectrum of quality as it helps them learn about a topic. You can also develop the "criteria" as a group at the beginning of the semester. You could require students to find a variety of sources individually or in small groups (e.g. newspaper, journal articles, magazines, blog posts, radio or new programs, etc.).

Interesting...very interesting...

Words We Love Too Much - NYTimes.com

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text.jpgShort blog post about word choice--would be useful to help students as they revise a paper to circle words they are using too often. In my case the word resources and also appear way to often.

http://topics.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/07/28/words-we-love-too-much-2/

Prefer Like-minded Views

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peerreviewedarticle.jpgStudies like this make me think we need to emphasize information literacy even more and be much more aware of how difficult critical thinking is--it goes against the brain...

"The analysis, reported this month in Psychological Bulletin, was led by researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Florida, and included data from 91 studies involving nearly 8,000 participants."

"Receiving information that supports one's position on an issue allows people to conclude that their views are correct but may often obscure reality. In contrast, receiving
information that contradicts one's view on an issue can cause people to feel misled or ignorant but may allow access to a valid representation of reality. Therefore, understanding how people strive to feel validated versus to be correct is critical to
explicating how they select information about an issue when several alternatives are present. We conducted a meta-analysis of field and laboratory studies on information exposure to shed light on these issues."


Hart, W., Albarracın, D., Eagly, A. H., Brechan, I., Lindberg, M. J., & Merrill, L. (2009). Feeling Validated Versus Being Correct: A Meta-Analysis of Selective Exposure to Information. Psychological Bulletin, 135(4), 555-588. doi: 10.1037/a0015701.

Google Initiative - OIT

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Have you heard of how Google will be moving into the U of M? Here are some Q/As from the OIT site:

Why is the University moving towards using Google Apps?
Partnering with Google will give University students, faculty, and staff access to a suite of state-of-the art communication and collaboration tools that will enhance their ability to work together. In addition to increased productivity opportunities, Google Apps also will allow the University to save costs in the long run by reducing the need to buy and support software, hardware, and storage to maintain our own independent e-mail service.

What applications will be available?
The University will use the Google Apps for Education Edition, which includes the following applications:

* Gmail (e-mail)
* Google Docs (word processing, spreadsheets, and presentations)
* Google Calendar
* Google Talk (instant messaging)

Keep in mind that the project team still is investigating whether all of these applications will be available in the University Google space.

Read more at: http://www.oit.umn.edu/google-initiative/

Quick look at an Essay Mill

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I came across this on the Chronicle of Higher Ed entitled: Journal to the Center of the Essay Mill:

Humorous look at peer-review

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This may be useful to include in a discussion of peer-review....

Fifth-Grade Science Paper Doesn't Stand Up To Peer Review

otter.jpg"DECATUR, IL—A three-member panel of 10-year-old Michael Nogroski's fellow classmates at Nathaniel Macon Elementary School unanimously agreed Tuesday that his 327-word essay "Otters" did not meet the requirements for peer approval. Nogroski presented his results before the entire fifth-grade science community Monday, in partial fulfillment of his seventh-period research project. According to the review panel, which convened in the lunchroom Tuesday, "Otters" was fundamentally flawed by Nogroski's failure to identify a significant research gap.

"When Mike said, 'Otters,' I almost puked," said 11-year-old peer examiner Lacey Swain, taking the lettuce out of her sandwich. "Why would you want to spend a whole page talking about otters?" "

Vacation...all it takes is a little research

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Wedding102.jpgMaking connections between successful Internet searching and new academic research can be as easy as talking about your favorite destination.

This blog post: Research: A Traveler's Best Friend from the Frugal Traveler in the New York Times can be a great way to introduce the concept of research.

Just like you want to find the lowest airline ticket and will search many sites to do it--so is the same process to search for a good journal article or book on a topic. I know most people don't stop at the first flight in the list--but students often do when search for a journal article.

Having students talk about/write about how they would approach researching a trip can be a good way to get across the process of research:
* Narrowing a topic (are you going to Italy or to Venice?)
* Searching (a $500 flight or a $300 flight to the same place)
* Evaluating (which hotel/hostel is better?)
* And even outlining/planning (planning your trip like planning your paper).

These connections will help students as they begin the adventure of academic research...

(p.s. that is a picture of me at the Guggenheim in New York City)

Great place for Undergrads to start research

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ugvl2.jpg
The library homepage can often be overwhelming and confusing for new researchers. We created the Undergraduate Virtual Library as a great starting place for undergrads. It includes a search box and links to Research QuickStart, the Assignment Calculator, Full Text finder and more.


Here is the link: http://www.lib.umn.edu/undergrad/

For First Year Writing Instructors

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How are you students doing with their Library research skills? Are you satisfied with the sources your students are citing? We can help. Our goal is to provide first year students the fundamental library and information literacy skills needed to help students locate and evaluate the sources (popular and scholarly) students use in their writing.

There are a number of resources available to First Year Writing instructors:

1.) Incorporate Unravel the Library workshops into your classes.
Online Unravel the Library 2 (http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/): Instructors can require students to take these online tutorials either in-class or on their own time (takes about 45 minutes). Students take a quiz and can print out the results to turn in to you. Points or extra credit can be given. Here are the Unravel 2: The Research Process Online learning outcomes: Identify appropriate article indexes and use them to find articles, use search techniques to find article for their topic, identify whether an article is considered scholarly or not.
Note: We changed our procedures so unlike last semester, students do NOT need an “enrollment key�? to get into the quiz.

2.) Face-to-face Unravel the Library 1, 2 or 3 (http://www.lib.umn.edu/registration/):
These sessions are held at various times throughout the semester. Students can be required to attend specific workshops. Students can get a certificate to turn in to you (signed by the librarian) for points or extra credit.

Unravel 1: Orientation to the Libraries & Tour of Wilson Library learning outcomes: Orientation to services and resources available through the Libraries, how to read a book and article citation, how to locate books and articles from a citation, Tour of Wilson Library.

Unravel 2: The Research Process learning outcomes: Identify appropriate article indexes and use them to find articles, use search techniques to find article for their topic, identify whether an article is considered scholarly or not.

Unravel 3: Beyond the Basics - Advanced Searching learning outcomes: Construct a simple search strategy, use advanced searching such as field searching, limiting, truncation and Boolean operators

Next Steps for you:

1. Assign Unravel 2 Online (give students this URL: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/). Instruct students to take the four Unravel modules and take the quiz. Students can then print out the quiz and turn in to you. They can log in at any time to access quiz results.

OR

Have us create an Unravel 2 Moodle page for your class. We can create a Moodle page with the modules and quiz. It will auto-populate with your students (no enrollment key needed). You will then be able to view your student’s progress and quiz results within the Moodle site. If you would like us to set this up please contact Kate Peterson (katep@umn.edu, 6-3746) or Andrew Palahnuik (ampala@umn.edu, 4-0365).

2. Assign Unravel the Library Face-to-Face workshop. Instruct students to register for an Unravel 1, 2 or 3 workshop at http://www.lib.umn.edu/registration/.