Recently in Sci/Tech Writing Category

Writing and First Year Writing Instructor Orientations

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It was a busy week of orientation. I wanted to share all of the various PPTs and handouts. Please use as needed.

Monday, August 30-Library Tools for Teaching

Wednesday, September 1--New FYW instructors


Project Information Literacy: Frustrations

Friday, September 3--All FYW instructors

Study Like a Scholar:

Please let me know if you have any questions or would like to discuss how the Libraries can support your teaching (or research)!
katep@umn.edu
612-626-3746
Walter Library 239

Scimagine 2010

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scimagine.jpgHow do you combine skills in problem solving and business development with a desire to make the world a better place?

Villagers in the Himalayan foothills prepare their food over smoky indoor wood fires, resulting in poor air quality that is one of the top 20 global causes of death. Student teams from the Institute of Technology, Carlson School of Management, and the School of Public Health have partnered with students at the Indian Institute of Technology in Roorkee to create a business plan that addresses this issue.

Teams from 14 universities in the U.S. and India are competing in the Acara Challenge 2010 for the opportunity to turn their plan into a sustainable business. Join us to find out how they met the challenge and what they learned about collaborating across continents.

SCImagine emphasizes the Science & Engineering Library's role as an intellectual gathering place on campus. Each spring, the Library showcases University teaching, learning and research in the physical sciences and engineering, offering fascinating presentations and lively discussions.

Google Starts Grant Program

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Google_book.jpg"Even as a lawsuit over its book-digitization project remains up in the air, the search giant has quietly started reaching out to universities in search of humanities scholars who are ready to roll up their sleeves and hit the virtual stacks.

The company is creating a "collaborative research program to explore the digital humanities using the Google Books corpus," according to a call for proposals obtained by The Chronicle. Some of Google's academic partners say the grant program marks the company's first formal foray into supporting humanities text-mining research."

Read more at: http://chronicle.com/article/Google-Starts-Grant-Program/64891/

againsttheodds.jpg

The Bio-Medical Library will be hosting the National Library of Medicine Exhibit, 'Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health.'

This traveling exhibit highlights the role of communities in improving health at home and around the world. The exhibition explores the shared basic needs required for a good quality of life, including nutritious food and clean water, a safe place to live, and affordable health care.

Using historical and contemporary photographs, the banners tell stories of collaboration between families, scientists, advocates, governments, and international organizations, all taking up the challenge to prevent disease and improve medical care.

This exhibition raises awareness of the sources and effects of health inequalities and invites each of us to join the global campaign for health and human rights.

January 19 - February 19, 2010
Bio-Medical Library
2nd floor, Diehl Hall

Opening Reception
Study Abroad Information Fair
Thursday, January 21, 10am-12 pm
2nd floor, Diehl Hall

Exhibit: The Machine That Changed the World

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acm_exhibit.jpg

One of the two largest computing societies in the world, the Association for Computing Machinery has been dedicated to the advancement of computing as a profession since its founding in 1947. This exhibit will explore the impact and importance of the ACM in an arena that has had a profound impact on modern life and society.

Monday, January 11, 2010 - Friday, March 5, 2010
Elmer L. Andersen Library Gallery

Opening Reception
Friday, January 29, 2010 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Elmer L. Andersen Library Atrium

What to do with digital data?

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How to Prepare Your College for an Uncertain Digital Future
digital.jpg"How can a university organize and preserve the deluge of digital data before it washes away--and preserve it for uses that have not been imagined yet?
The data could be anything from student-produced course work to raw research results to informal material like blogs and wikis."

Paolo U. Mangiafico does a job that is not easy to describe. Duke University calls him director of digital information strategy. But the work isn't just information technology, or scholarly communication, or library services. It's all of them...

http://chronicle.com/article/How-to-Prepare-Your-College/49455/

image by ecstaticist

Try a January Workshop

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Library Workshops-January 2010
Take advantage of our great selection of workshops to help you learn new skills and tools for your library research, academic writing and teaching. To register go to http://www.lib.umn.edu/services/workshops/registration.

January 4-8
Introduction to Citation Managers
Learn why you should use a citation manager. This workshop will look at 3 common citation managers, RefWorks, EndNote and Zotero. Their features will be compared so you can decide which citation manager best meets your needs.
Time: Tuesday, 01/05/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 101 Walter Library

RefWorks: Basics
Learn the basics of using RefWorks, the Web-based citation manager that is available to all U of M Faculty, students and staff. Adding references to RefWorks will be covered, as well as exporting them to Word, and selecting a style (MLA, APA, etc) for your bibliography. See http://www.lib.umn.edu/refworks/ for more details about RefWorks. This class is available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html
Time: Wednesday, 01/06/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Zotero: Basics
Zotero is a *free* Firefox extension that helps you collect citations and website information from within your Firefox browser. We'll show you how to install Zotero and use it to capture citations, organize your research, and format bibliographies and in-text citations.
This class is available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html
Thu, 01/07/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library


January 11-15
Getting Published: How to Publish Your Science Research Article
This workshop, intended for graduate students and newer faculty in the sciences, will help you identify appropriate journals to which to submit your article and discuss how to manage your rights when signing a contract with a publisher. Join your colleagues to share your ideas and discuss the issues you face as an emerging academic author.
Time: Monday, 01/11/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

RefWorks: Basics
Learn the basics of using RefWorks, the Web-based citation manager that is available to all U of M Faculty, students and staff. Adding references to RefWorks will be covered, as well as exporting them to Word, and selecting a style (MLA, APA, etc) for your bibliography. See http://www.lib.umn.edu/refworks/ for more details about RefWorks. This class is also available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html
Time: Monday, 01/11/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

How do I Know I Found Everything?
Working on a new research project, a thesis or dissertation? Need to be comprehensive in your literature search? Explore ways to approach the search, and identify useful--and perhaps unusual--resources.
Time: Tuesday, 01/12/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

Zotero: Basics
Zotero is a *free* Firefox extension that helps you collect citations and website information from within your Firefox browser. We'll show you how to install Zotero and use it to capture citations, organize your research, and format bibliographies and in-text citations. This class is also available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html
Time: Tuesday, 01/12/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

EndNote: Basics
An introduction to using EndNote. Learn to import citations, customize your account, and format your bibliographies and in-text citations. We'll also discuss using EndNote in conjunction with EndNoteWeb, a web-based version of EndNote available for free to current University of Minnesota students, faculty, and staff. Find a self-paced online version of this course at http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html.
Time: Tuesday, 01/12/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Creating Posters Using PowerPoint
Getting ready to do a poster at an upcoming conference? Learn pointers about using PowerPoint to create the poster as one giant slide, and send it to a large-scale printer.
Time: Tuesday, 01/12/2010 - 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

Introduction to Data Management for Scientists and Engineers
Digital data is growing at an exponential rate, and the work involved in managing that data is rapidly increasing as well. How can we ensure that our research data will still be available in a usable form in 5, 10, or 20 years? We will discuss why having a data management plan is important as well as key considerations and best practices for data management.
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Grant Funding for Graduate Students
Find out more about funding opportunities available to graduate students. Learn how to use IRIS, SPIN, and Community of Science and the Foundation Directory to search for grant opportunities. Setting up e-mail updates on specific subjects will also be covered, as well as how to find internal U of M funding sources. Resources for the course are listed on the Web site of the Office of the VP for Research, http://www.collaborate.umn.edu/explore/searching.html.
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 11:00am - 12:15pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 3:00pm - 4:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Google for Researchers
With Google, you already search the web, share photos/movies/music, map directions and discover new things...but there are some tools you may have missed. This web search engine is on a mission to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible." So let's explore the new tools and technology that pair Google-efficient tools with library-quality results to weave together a rich information web that goes beyond just the World Wide Web. We'll look at tools such as, Google Docs, RSS Reader, Google Scholar, and iGoogle Research Gadgets that will help you access, evaluate, and share information in an easy collaborative environment.
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

RefWorks: Advanced
For RefWorks users who would like to learn more about linking to full text documents, editing styles, and other specialized tasks. Attendees are encouraged to bring their RefWorks questions to the session. A list of advanced features may be found at http://courses.lib.umn.edu/page.phtml?page_id=2603
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

Formatting Your Dissertation or Thesis in *Word 2007*
Focus on your research instead of your formatting! In this workshop, you'll learn how to use Microsoft Word features effectively and efficiently. We'll cover inserting images and charts, getting your page numbers in the right place, generating tables of contents and figures; and more. Please note that this workshop covers the basic formatting you'll need to comply with Graduate School guidelines. Participants should have basic experience using MS Word. Note this version of the workshop specifically uses Office 2007; an instruction manual is available for Word 2003. We will be using a template and not be working with individual dissertations. Class materials can be found on the Moodle page, at: https://moodle.umn.edu/course/view.php?id=5102. This class is available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html.
Thu, 01/14/2010 - 10:00am - 12:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)
Time: Thursday, 01/14/2010 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

EndNote: Basics
An introduction to using EndNote. Learn to import citations, customize your account, and format your bibliographies and in-text citations. We'll also discuss using EndNote in conjunction with EndNoteWeb, a web-based version of EndNote available for free to current University of Minnesota students, faculty, and staff. Find a self-paced online version of this course at http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html.
Time: Thursday, 01/14/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

Introduction to Citation Managers
Learn why you should use a citation manager. This workshop will look at 3 common citation managers, RefWorks, EndNote and Zotero. Their features will be compared so you can decide which citation manager best meets your needs.
Time: Friday, 01/15/2010 - 10:30am - 11:30am
Location: S30B Wilson Library

Leveraging Archival Materials into the Curriculum
With a world of materials from art, images, books and reports to maps, blue prints, letters, and more; Archives and Special Collections (http://special.lib.umn.edu/) at the U will broaden a student's experience in any class. This workshop will help faculty and instructors to navigate the logistics of using archival material in your instruction. Get ideas for the possibilities of using primary materials to enrich the classroom experience. A tour will be offered at the end of the workshop.
Time: Fri, 01/15/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 120b Andersen Library

Assignment Idea: Sherlock Holmes

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holmes.jpg
Have you seen the movie? Did you know the University of Minnesota has over 60,000 items related to Sherlock Holmes? You could have students analyze the letters and other items--what do they say? What do they mean?

Learn more: http://special.lib.umn.edu/rare/holmes.phtml

Legal Opinions added to Google Scholar

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google_law.jpg

Here is something from Google on the addition: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/11/finding-laws-that-govern-us.html

and here is one other blog post from a law librarian who reviewed it: http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/law_librarian_blog/2009/11/testing-google-scholar-for-legal-research.html

fgi.jpgIn response to a recent blog post and story on said blog post in Inside Higher Ed (Furor Over Anti-Gay Blog) our data services librarian, Amy West, broken down his arguments and supported counterclaims with data (In response to the "Economic case against homosexuality").

This would be a good model for students to break down an argument paragraph by paragraph and systematically give counter points with evidence. It also would help students learn how to use arguments that go against their own viewpoints effectively. We often talk to studnets who are only looking for information at support their own viewpoints--getting them into arguments in this manner may help.

Living with too much information?

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We would all agree that we live in an Information Age. In fact it is a Too-Much Information Age. How are our skills for dealing with information going to need to change? And what skills do we need to be teaching students to deal with this?

Should we be teaching social media? Should we be teaching Twitter Literacies? Should we be teaching students to dip into the flow of information or how to be an information nomad?

Here are a couple things from Howard Rheingold who teaches Participatory Media/Collective Action at UC Berkeley's School of Information, Digital Journalism at Stanford University.

Social Media Classroom: http://socialmediaclassroom.com/

Here is a 40 minute presentation on teaching 21st century literacies. He talks about changes he made to his college courses.

Howard Rheingold's 21st century literacies:

* Attention- knowing how to focus and how to divide your attention without losing the ability to concentrate. It's more than multitasking; it's learning how to exercise attention.
* Participation- particularly the more constructive modes of participation that are useful to others
* Collaboration- being ready to organize together, and enable a collective response to emerge
* Critical consumption-aka "crap detection" the ability to spot bad info from good.
* Network awareness- the combination of reputation, social capital, "presentation of self" and other sensitivity to individual positioning within the network collective.

Literacies = skills + community

Now I just have to find some time to read more....

changes in thought through editions

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origin.jpg

Data visualization is an interesting field when applied to texts. Here is an example using the Origins of Species...

Take a look: http://benfry.com/traces/

"We often think of scientific ideas, such as Darwin's theory of evolution, as fixed notions that are accepted as finished. In fact, Darwin's On the Origin of Species evolved over the course of several editions he wrote, edited, and updated during his lifetime. The first English edition was approximately 150,000 words and the sixth is a much larger 190,000 words. In the changes are refinements and shifts in ideas -- whether increasing the weight of a statement, adding details, or even a change in the idea itself."

"The idea that we can actually see change over time in a person's thinking is fascinating. Darwin scholars are of course familiar with this story, but here we can view it directly, both on a macro-level as it animates, or word-by-word as we examine pieces of the text more closely." (from http://benfry.com/writing/archives/529)

Library Workshops for Fall are filling up fast

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To register go to: http://www.lib.umn.edu/services/workshops/registration

Here are a few of my recommendations:

Zotero: Basics
Zotero is a *free* Firefox extension that helps you collect citations and website information from within your Firefox browser. We'll show you how to install Zotero and use it to capture citations, organize your research, and format bibliographies and in-text citations.
Time: Wednesday, 9/23/2009 - 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Location: Walter Library 310

Creating Posters Using PowerPoint
Getting ready to do a poster at an upcoming conference? Learn pointers about using PowerPoint to create the poster as one giant slide, and send it to a large-scale printer.
Time: Monday, 09/28/2009 - 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library
Formatting Your Dissertation or Thesis in *Word 2007*
Focus on your research instead of your formatting! In this workshop, you'll learn how to use Microsoft Word features effectively and efficiently. We'll cover inserting images and charts, getting your page numbers in the right place, generating tables of contents and figures; and more. Please note that this workshop covers the basic formatting you'll need to comply with Graduate School guidelines. For advanced formatting questions, please consult the Writing Center. Participants should have basic experience using MS Word. Note this version of the workshop specifically uses Office 2007; an instruction manual is available for Word 2003. We will be using a template and not be working with individual dissertations. Class materials can be found on the Moodle page, at: https://moodle.umn.edu/course/view.php?id=5102
Time: Monday, 10/05/2009 - 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Introduction to Citation Managers
Learn why you should use a citation manager. This workshop will look at 3 common citation managers, RefWorks, EndNote and Zotero. Their features will be compared so you can decide which citation manager best meets your needs.
Time: Tuesday, 10/06/2009 - 11:15am - 12:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Getting Published: How to Publish Your Science Research Article
This workshop, intended for graduate students and newer faculty in the sciences, will help you identify appropriate journals to which to submit your article and discuss how to manage your rights when signing a contract with a publisher. Join your colleagues to share your ideas and discuss the issues you face as an emerging academic author.
Time: Monday, 10/19/2009 - 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Google for Researchers
With Google, you already search the web, share photos/movies/music, map directions and discover new things...but there are some tools you may have missed. This web search engine is on a mission to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible." So let's explore the new tools and technology that pair Google-efficient tools with library-quality results to weave together a rich information web that goes beyond just the World Wide Web. We'll look at tools such as, Google Docs, RSS Reader, Google Scholar, and iGoogle Research Gadgets that will help you access, evaluate, and share information in an easy collaborative environment.
Time: Thursday, 10/22/2009 - 10:00am - 11:00am
Location: 310 Walter Library

Grant Funding for Graduate Students
Find out more about funding opportunities available to graduate students. Learn how to use IRIS, SPIN, and Community of Science and the Foundation Directory to search for grant opportunities. Setting up e-mail updates on specific subjects will also be covered, as well as how to find internal U of M funding sources. Resources for the course are listed on the Web site of the Office of the VP for Research, http://www.collaborate.umn.edu/explore/searching.html.
Time: Wednesday, 11/04/2009 - 3:00pm - 4:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Let me know if you have questions.

Writing Studies-Library Orientation

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Today I am presenting and teaching a couple of sessions along with the Writing Studies Instructors Orientation.

**Library Tools for Teaching (with Shannon Klug)

**Library Research Beyond Google (with guest Professor Don Ross)

**Library Handout (Best 14 for Writing Studies)

Please let me know if you have any questions!
Thanks,
Kate

Top 5 citation apps

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How do you organize your research? There are more and more tools to help:

from http://instructify.com/2009/07/16/top-5-citation-applications/:
1. BibMe
2. Citation Machine
3. EasyBib
4. OttoBib
5. Word 2007

Check our our new comparison chart of the citation managers recommended through the libraries: Introduction to Citation Managers Chart

Let me know if you have more questions!

how do you write a digital textbook?

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npr.jpgI have seen a couple of things today that have made me ask that question. I read something about National Public Radio that talked about their website redesign (http://www.npr.org/) and how their content is beyond "radio" and that the goal is to make their content work on multiple media (website, radio, blog, etc.). As these barriers between form/genres is continuing to degrade...how does that change how writing is taught? Or does it?

Here is a story about digital textbooks and how many K-12 schools seem to be moving in this direction: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/09/education/09textbook.html

"Kids are wired differently these days," said Sheryl R. Abshire, chief technology officer for the Calcasieu Parish school system in Lake Charles, La. "They're digitally nimble. They multitask, transpose and extrapolate. And they think of knowledge as infinite.
"They don't engage with textbooks that are finite, linear and rote," Dr. Abshire continued. "Teachers need digital resources to find those documents, those blogs, those wikis that get them beyond the plain vanilla curriculum in the textbooks."

Most of the digital texts submitted for review in California came from a nonprofit group, CK-12 Foundation, that develops free "flexbooks" that can be customized to meet state standards, and added to by teachers. Its physics flexbook, a Web-based, open-content compilation, was introduced in Virginia in March.

..."The good part of our flexbooks is that they can be anything you want," said Neeru Khosla, a founder of the group. "You can use them online, you can download them onto a disk, you can print them, you can customize them, you can embed video. When people get over the mind-set issue, they'll see that there's no reason to pay $100 a pop for a textbook, when you can have the content you want free."

What do you think?

Assignment idea: Rating the news

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I tripped across Health New Review: http://www.healthnewsreview.org/ (published by Gary Schwitzer
Associate Professor, University of Minnesota School of Journalism & Mass Communication, Health Journalism MA program).healthnews.jpg

I think the site itself is great but how about modifying this for a class project? Have students find materials on the class topic and then rate and evaluate what they find. I think the star rating system would help student begin to build a mental spectrum of quality as it helps them learn about a topic. You can also develop the "criteria" as a group at the beginning of the semester. You could require students to find a variety of sources individually or in small groups (e.g. newspaper, journal articles, magazines, blog posts, radio or new programs, etc.).

Interesting...very interesting...

Scientific article of the future?

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articleoffuture.jpg

http://beta.cell.com/

"Article of the Future...is an ongoing collaboration with the scientific community to redefine how the scientific article is presented online. The project's goal is to take full advantage of online capabilities, allowing readers individualized entry points and routes through the content, while using the latest advances in visualization techniques. We have developed prototypes for two articles from Cell to demonstrate initial concepts and get feedback from the scientific community."

monkey.jpgGreat analysis of the importance and challenges of evaluation based on a popular story that emerged recently. This would be a good read and source of discussion for those in sci/tech writing.

http://junkfoodscience.blogspot.com/2009/07/calorie-restrictive-eating-for-longer.html


image from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/66164549@N00/2491909299/

mylibrary.jpgWe know the University Libraries and the homepage can be overwhelming. We have so much great stuff it can be difficult to get quickly to the most useful places for you. We have a solution.

Do you use the myLibrary tab? This is a page you can use to organize your favorite resources, indexes, ejournals, databases and more. It includes the books you have checked out and dates they are due back.

To get to your page, click on "my Library" from either of the the following two locations.
1. Library homepage:
mylibrary_tab.jpg

2. MyU portal
mylibrary_portal.jpg

Then as you use the University Libraries, simply click on the "Add to myLibrary" button whenever you see it. It will then become part of your page.
addtomylibrary.jpg

And students can do this too!


Sound good?

Gain background in Science and Technical issues

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THE CONSORTIUM ON LAW AND VALUES' 10TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE, "What's Next in Law, Health, and the Life Sciences? Debating Openness, Access, and Accountability," will take place March 6, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Cowles Auditorium, Humphrey Center. For more information, see http://lifesci.consortium.umn.edu/conferences/2009_whatsnext.

monk.jpg http://monkproject.org/

"MONK is a digital environment designed to help humanities scholars discover and analyze patterns in the texts they study. It supports both micro analyses of the verbal texture of an individual text and macro analyses that let you locate texts in the context of a large document space consisting of hundreds or thousands of other texts. Shuttling between the “micro” and the “macro” is a distinctive feature of the MONK environment, where you may read as closely as you wish but can also practice many forms of what Franco Moretti has provocatively called “distant reading.”"