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Done writing and re-writing

I have spent most of this week attempting to write this blog post with little success, so for the sake of my own sanity I'm going to keep it relatively short.

I really enjoyed the chapter from Connect! this week but disagree with much of what it has to say. I personally don't think that there is an appropriate place for Facebook in many corporate environments. I find that most of my clients are trying to limit how much "digital communication" they participate in because they spend their entire day answering emails. The idea of using Facebook in the professional environment only seems to work for Web 2.0 or technology companies, an environment that fosters technological progress. Many finance or law firms are worried more about the legal implications of what their employees may put online then building new personal relationships through the web. On the other hand, I find Zelenka's suggestion of using Google talk in the office to be great. I work in a relatively small firm so it seems silly to pick up the phone to talk to someone only 10 feet away (in another private office) but yelling is neither professional nor courteous. So we spend a lot of time trading emails with each other which is inconvenient for quick questions. Earlier this week I implemented Google talk use between myself and a coworker. We love it, it allows to have a quick little personal chat to catch up or ask a quick question. Brilliant!

On another note, the Wikinomics reading brought me up to speed on the use of mashups. I didn't realize that Amazon and Google (two of the most powerful web companies) encourage freelance use of their material. It's interesting how Paul Rademacher was hired by Google because of the program he built to help himself find a house. Although, I do agree with the point made by Anil Dash on page 205 in reference to exploiting these contributors. I personally feel that individuals who make really great contributions on platforms for participation should receive some sort of compensation. If companies like Google, Amazon and Ebay are going to profit from the work of these individuals then there should be some sort of profit sharing, whether it should be a set amount or a percentage I don't know but some sort of gratuity should be involved.

Until later my fellow emergents.

Comments

I do agree with you about corporations and law firms not wanting their employees to submerge themselves in the facebook frenzy, however there are alot of jobs that network through Facebook. In fact my friends sister in law runs Camp Judea and she makes most of her networking through Facebook because the ages are between 15-19 years old. She even hires people who are proficient in social networks such as Facebook and Myspace. It just depends on the target audience.

Hello Stephanie, if you're wondering what I'm doing up so early on a Sunday, it's a big day today with Super Bowl Sunday and the Sunday before the Chinese New Year. Regarding your posting, when I was reading your comment, "I personally don't think that there is an appropriate place for Facebook in many corporate environments..." I was thinking about my work. During the chat with Jenny S on Thursday, I had mentioned that I felt as though it was discouraged at work to the point that any window that hinted at web surfing would have to be opened on my desktop at like 4 inches by 4 inches. A little funny when I think of it! Perhaps it will change as the years go by?! Things are always changing. We'll see. Thanks for your post!

"I find that most of my clients are trying to limit how much "digital communication" they participate in because they spend their entire day answering emails."

Interesting point. The internet is supposed to streamline businesses - less phone-calls, less need for face-to-face contact, easier collaboration - but, like you said, it often has the opposite effect. When there's dozens of social networking sites and platforms, it becomes hard to keep up, even with an RSS feeder. Like Connect! mentions, a common touchstone that combines all of these would be best, but there hasn't been one successful enough because not only do the platforms keep multiplying, they're still in competition with each other. A point to watch.