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Memorization and it's affects on specialization

“Your job as a web worker is not so much to memorize and absorb everything as to bring your self into connection with it all at critical points so that you can navigate the space when you need to.� – (Zelenka Connect!, p.137)

This view of Zelenka’s is not only a popular one, but one that has quickly become the dominant view in American society. Whether this view on memorization is a factor that has arisen because of the increasing availability of easy to access information or vice versa is not one that can be easily answered. The actual cause of this point of view while important to understanding how changes in popular beliefs happen it is not very relevant to how people deal with this view in their lives. However, like Zelenka mentions understanding this point of view is important to knowing how you can alter your thought processes to “make your job during web surfing much easier� (Connect!, p.134). She continued to augment this thought with the condition that you need to know a certain amount of the subject you use to be able to understand the information you find while searching. This level of knowledge about a subject is still significantly easier to reach than the level of knowledge that was required in specific subjects before information gathering online was prevalent. While this means that it is easier to become proficient in more subjects than before it means that people are specializing less then before the popularization of online knowledge gathering. This can probably be best seen in the increasing popularity of scientific and technical communicators who can act as intermediaries between those of differing and more specialization.

Comments

I agree with you I think. Are you trying to say that because teleporting is so easy and finding specific answers to questions is specific that the knowledge base for certain topics is regressing? If so, I agree with you 100%. Finding the answer to something specific does not mean that you understand it entirely. Teleporting is like solving a math proof with no theorem but you have the answer key on hand.

I agree with you I think. I think that the less time that we spend building our knowledge base through orienteering, the less we know about the subject we are researching... that is if we are just teleporting there.

I agree with you I think. I think that the less time that we spend building our knowledge base through orienteering, the less we know about the subject we are researching... that is if we are just teleporting there.

Thanks for extending Zelenka's discussion on this subject. It makes me wonder whether all of us need to be taught library science as a matter of course, starting in grade school. And now that I think about it, perhaps library science is no longer the appropriate name for the discipline.

I associate your posting to an issue I was thinking about last week regarding memory although in a completely different direction. My parents are in their 70s and apparently starting to have some memory loss. I learned this because my mother told me that my dad didn't always remember my home phone number. (Which makes me sad because everyone loves my phone number because it's so easy to remember). Consequently, the cell phone was becoming a portable memory aid for him. I wonder if information technology has a general application in memory assistance. It seems like it may have enormous potential for people with memory loss.