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All the wrong moves

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A group of many people made up the central decision making of Nutrorim. The top management was made up of too many impatient people that were not on the same page. Different people had different problems with how decisions were made, and these problems were never formally discussed. The lack of a definitive leader taking charge was definitely a weakness of the organization. This was evident during the recall of their product Charge Up. They were feeling the pressure from the threat of the problem becoming public, which would make them susceptible to lawsuits. Our recommendation was for the CEO to take charge, make tough decisions, and keep the meetings from being too hectic. While he should still give others their opportunity for input, he should be the final decisions maker and any structure for dealing with conflict should run through him. We thought the rationale model would be the most effective way to guide the decision making processes required at Nutrorium. Given the many problems the organization faces with decision making, a basic model that gave roles to specific people would be best to make decisions easier to come up with. It would also speed up the process, and give everyone in the organization their own place and importance for input on decisions.

Context:

The culture that exists around Major League Baseball, in our opinion, is a mediocre one. We say this because for so many years, prior 2005, there was no anti-doping policy or regular testing done in regards to banning performance enhancing drugs. Now they at least have a drug testing policy and penalties for those who test positive, however, that's not to say that it is the best and most effective policy. We feel that they should increase the severity of the penalties because they are given so many chances. Does that really teach a lesson and protect the integrity of the game? Someone who fails their first drug test is suspended for 50 games out of the season. The next failed tests results in a 100 game suspension and if a third test is failed then that individual is banned for life. However, they can seek reinstatement after two years of suspension so we just don't think that this is a culture that is really trying to protect the integrity of the game of baseball.  The subcultures that we feel exist in the MLB culture are; the majority who we think are those who do not use performing enhancing drugs and also those who do in fact who do use them. As far as stakeholders are concerned, we felt that fans, for example, have a better attitude towards those who admit to it and who accept responsibility for their actions rather than those who deny it when there is reasonable proof leading to that suspicion.  We think that the culture that surrounds MLB in regards to performance enhancing drugs trickles down all the way from the commissioner down to the players and fans and that culture gives the impression that using these substances isn't that big of a deal. It is moving in the right direction because they at least implemented a policy, but if they are serious about freezing this culture then greater steps need to be taken.

Symbolic Component:

Everyone involved in the MLB needs to put their foot down and insist that there is no room for the use of performance enhancing drugs. Managers, coaches, and training staff could be more involved and pay closer attention to know what is going on with the players at all times. The more the players feel that they can get away with this, they are going to continue to use these substances because better performance equals more money.

Organizational Activities:

The MLB needs to go back and identify and/or recreate its core values, ideas and beliefs. We also said that a big part of the problem begins in the minor leagues. If the minor leagues are  more strict about their anti-doping policy, fewer players would begin using illegal substances to help them get their "big break." By making punishments more severe and giving players less chances is going to help protect the integrity of the game of baseball. Also, increasing fines may help because players seem to learn their lesson after paying a large fine. Perhaps a salary cap would also help this issue. Since the rewards system in the MLB is based on performance, why wouldn't they use performance enhancing drugs? That's how they make more money. Maybe they should reward those who pass their drug tests or instate bonuses to teams who stay drug free. It's unfortunate that it should have to come to this; however, I think it would seriously have a positive effect on the culture of this sport organization. Peer groups within the MLB should hold one another accountable as well otherwise nothing will change. Another thing to possibly change is to portray a negative image around those who fail drug tests and do the opposite for those adhering to the rules and playing fairly.

Ryan Prochaska and Laura Schnell Nike doesn't depict a learning organization very well. We think Nike learned that they must be socially responsible in order to be successful or at least appear to be socially responsible to the public. We placed Nike in the compliance stage of learning because they are still resistant to making social responsibility a core duty. They do the bare minimum in order to get by. Nike used many different strategies to address their critics views of unethical corporate practices. 1) Nike hired firms to do audits on the factories in other countries to try and make sure they are up to standards, which proved to be ineffective. 2) Acquired the "Starter" brand. Made sure they made it clear to manufacturers they are going to keep up on their social responsibility measures in terms of production of the product, even though it is an inexpensive product. Somewhat effective. 3) Nike developed a corporate responsibility department and made themselves a leader in the movement. This was an effective move by Nike, shows they are making more of an effort to change and look into their shortcomings.

amis et all

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Ryan Prochaska, Kristen Dockery, Dustin Permann, Laura Schnell Power: 1. One person, either volunteer or employee, needs to be appointed to have ultimate power. This will make that person accountable for the decisions being made and will allow others to receive orders from someone. This person needs to be able to implement standards and make sure everyone is on board during the decision making process 2. There should be a committee created with both employees and volunteers on board. Together they will share ideas and make all known concerns heard. These committee leaders will then disperse the information to the rest of the workers. Interest: 1. Involve everyone in the decision making process. If everyone's voices are heard discussion on the pros and cons will be addressed allowing the organization to make the best possible decision. 2. Allow everyone access to information that is vital for decision making. By doing this employees and volunteers may see flaws in their original viewpoint and it allows them to base their decision on what is best for the organization as a whole. Complexity: 1. The organization needs a mission statement that is well supported. 2. Both the employees and volunteers need to start looking at things from both perspectives. They need to realize that change is inevitable and just because they change one perspective to give the other group power they are helping the organization and not giving up total power for future decisions.

NESCAC Case Study

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Kristen Dockery Dustin Permann Laura Schnell Team Org. Man The common goals of the NESCAC include: Intercollegiate athletic programs were to be kept in harmony with the essential academic purpose of member institutions, competing players were to be representatives of the student body, and the academic authority in each college was to control intercollegiate athletic policy. The president's decision kept the academic purpose of the institutions intact since the ruling lessened conflicts with academic scheduling. Students, faculty, and trustees were some of the important stake holders that were affected. The compromise gave one team a chance to compete in the postseason for the students to participate in which gave them a goal to work for competitively. Faculty did not have to worry about a long postseason that conflicted with academics, but with that trustees were given a competitive structure that kept academic integrity. The decision did however create a structure that could drive potential student athletes to schools that had a structure that included a standard post-season. The team and the institution would lack national exposure that could persuade student athletes to the conference. The faculty could be disproven by the claim that athletes that have competed in post-season play have had no evidence of reduced academic achievement. We believe the structure should become more decentralized from the centralized structure that gives the president all the power. Trustees, AD, faculty, and a student board should all have a representative that meets for a vote on key issues. One person cannot make a decision while taking everyone's priorities into question. We believe a small bracketed playoff would be the best solution to the problem. While the regular season may have to be shortened which would mean a few teams would lose a few games, the best teams could compete for a true champion while still not conflicting with finals. We decided that the divisional model would be best to decide future policy issues. While the presidents could oversee major policy changes, the athletic directors and possible a board made up of the important stake holders could come up with policies and decide on them. The presidents would be in charge of making sure the policies hold serve with the goals of the NESCAC.

Kristen Dockery

Dustin Permann

Laura Schnell

Ryan Prochaska

 

Group Case Study Analysis

 

1.      The people that we determined that should decide what expectations have priority in an intercollegiate athletic program are; the head coach, then the rest of the coaching staff, and the athletic director. We also thought that it is good for programs to have some autonomy so that that athletic director isn't trying to tell every program exactly what to do and how to do it.

2.      The values that we came up with that underpin each of the six determinants of success are as follows:

Performance on the field- Predominantly values winning and perhaps promoting good sportsmanship during competition.

Education- Values high graduation rates, a solid G.P.A., regular attendance in class, and involvement in both class and perhaps volunteer opportunities.

Ethics- Respecting and adhering to the institutions mission statement, rules, and expectations as much as possible.

External Profile- Values marketing a positive image of the university for example having a reputation of honesty and being well-respected.

Institutional enthusiasm- Bringing the community together and creating a family-like atmosphere.

Resource Management- Values having successful programs to stimulate booster support and, with that, being efficient financially.

3.      MSU should place the highest priority on recruiting great players that also excel in the classroom to ensure a successful program both on and off the field. They should also be willing to go out and find a well-respected and previously successful coach to ensure winning.

4.      Additional expectations that MSU could add to help achieve the athletic departments objectives is set goals for winning their conference. Also we thought that they could really promote the importance of life after athletics which emphasizes the importance of succeeding academically.

5.      Four operational goals that would help the athletic department meet objective number four are selling out games, sponsorships, allocating scholarships efficiently, and winning to ensure continued booster support.

6.      A model that could help MSU assess effectiveness is the competing values model. I mentioned earlier that we felt it was important that there is no single-best criterion for an organization's effectiveness and that is exactly what this model is based on. Effectiveness is a subjective concept and, as it says in our book, the criterion used to assess a program depends on the evaluator's values. We felt that many of these models could apply but decided predominantly on the competing values model.

Kristen Dockery Dustin Permann Laura Schnell Ryan Prochaska Group Case Study Analysis 1. The people that we determined that should decide what expectations have priority in an intercollegiate athletic program are; the head coach, then the rest of the coaching staff, and the athletic director. We also thought that it is good for programs to have some autonomy so that that athletic director isn't trying to tell every program exactly what to do and how to do it. 2. The values that we came up with that underpin each of the six determinants of success are as follows: Performance on the field- Predominantly values winning and perhaps promoting good sportsmanship during competition. Education- Values high graduation rates, a solid G.P.A., regular attendance in class, and involvement in both class and perhaps volunteer opportunities. Ethics- Respecting and adhering to the institutions mission statement, rules, and expectations as much as possible. External Profile- Values marketing a positive image of the university for example having a reputation of honesty and being well-respected. Institutional enthusiasm- Bringing the community together and creating a family-like atmosphere. Resource Management- Values having successful programs to stimulate booster support and, with that, being efficient financially. 3. MSU should place the highest priority on recruiting great players that also excel in the classroom to ensure a successful program both on and off the field. They should also be willing to go out and find a well-respected and previously successful coach to ensure winning. 4. Additional expectations that MSU could add to help achieve the athletic departments objectives is set goals for winning their conference. Also we thought that they could really promote the importance of life after athletics which emphasizes the importance of succeeding academically. 5. Four operational goals that would help the athletic department meet objective number four are selling out games, sponsorships, allocating scholarships efficiently, and winning to ensure continued booster support. 6. A model that could help MSU assess effectiveness is the competing values model. I mentioned earlier that we felt it was important that there is no single-best criterion for an organization's effectiveness and that is exactly what this model is based on. Effectiveness is a subjective concept and, as it says in our book, the criterion used to assess a program depends on the evaluator's values. We felt that many of these models could apply but decided predominantly on the competing values model.