« Wild dogs kill gazzelles at Jackson Zoo | Main | Ethics code may be instated after New Brighton Prostitution sting »

Trash cans burned feverishly into the night as riot police threw tear gas into crowds of rioting young people.

Youth in Athens, Greece continued a second day of rioting in response to the death of a 15-year-old boy at the hands of Athens authorities, according to the New York Times.

Officials were optimistic that the rioting was quelled on Saturday.

"It at first seemed like it was calming down today, but then at 5 p.m. Athens time it kicked off again," according to Joel Brown, a CNN senior press officer visiting Athens. "There are lots of burning bins and debris in the street and a huge amount of tear gas in the air, which we got choked with on the way back to our hotel," he said.

CNN reports, that the officer responsible with the 15year-old's death has been charged with premeditated murder, but that the action has failed to stop the rioting.

The Greek government has grown accustomed to displeasure of the ruling class among the young people of Greece. However, according to the New York Times, the speed and ferocity of the rioting in this instance has taken Greek officials by surprise.

Rioters have used additional media outlets, such as the internet, to organize and coordinate the ritoing, which has involved car burnings and building intrusions.

Ironically, the boy whom the officer is responsible for killing and serves as the catalyst for the current rioting, was shot after a number of demonstrators pelted police vehicles with rocks, the boy included.

Far from warranting the attacks, Greek Interior Minister Prokopis Pavlopoulos stated that a backlash is to be expected.

“It is inconceivable for there not to be punishment when a person, let alone a minor, loses their life.? He added: “The loss of life is something that is inconceivable in a democracy.?

http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/12/07/greece.riots/index.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/08/world/europe/08greece.html?_r=1&ref=world