katep: December 2009 Archives

Undergraduate Research

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I think undergraduate research can be a great "frame" to think and talk about information literacy...especially the more academic aspects of information literacy. I look forward to looking more a this book/report. We are working on drafting an Assignment Calculator for UROP. Here is rough draft: https://tools.lib.umn.edu/ac/?assnId=191.

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Developing undergraduate research and inquiry
Mick Healey and Alan Jenkins
The Higher Education Academy
June 2009
undergrad_research.jpg
Executive summary

This paper argues that all undergraduate students in all higher education institutions should experience learning through, and about, research and inquiry. In undergraduate research, students learn and are assessed in ways that come as close as possible to the experience of academic staff carrying out their disciplinary research.The origins of our paper lie, in part, in previous published work worldwide - including our work - on bringing together teaching and disciplinary research. In particular, the paper stems from the United States undergraduate research movement, which started by providing research opportunities for selected students in selected institutions. We argue, as does much recent US experience, that such curricular experience should and can be mainstreamed for all or many students through a research-active curriculum. We argue that this can be achieved through structured interventions at course team, departmental, institutional and national levels. The argument is complemented by a large selection of mini case studies, drawn particularly from the UK, North America and Australasia.

List Of Case Studies
  • Engaging students in research and inquiry at the beginning of their academic studies
  • Engaging students in research and inquiry later in their academic studies
  • Undergraduate research and inquiry in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines
  • Undergraduate research and inquiry in humanities, social sciences and interdisciplinary studies
  • Undergraduate research and inquiry in departments and course teams
  • Undergraduate research and inquiry in institutions

http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/York/documents/resources/publications/DevelopingUndergraduate_Final.pdf

Teaching about digital data?

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How to Prepare Your College for an Uncertain Digital Future
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"How can a university organize and preserve the deluge of digital data before it washes away--and preserve it for uses that have not been imagined yet? The data could be anything from student-produced course work to raw research results to informal material like blogs and wikis." Paolo U. Mangiafico does a job that is not easy to describe. Duke University calls him director of digital information strategy. But the work isn't just information technology, or scholarly communication, or library services. It's all of them...
http://chronicle.com/article/How-to-Prepare-Your-College/49455/

 What is the role of instruction in thinking about digital data?

image by ecstaticist

January Workshops

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Most of the workshops for January are in the workshops registration database:

Feel free to use this below to add to your own blogs or to email to faculty and grad students.

Library Workshops-January 2010
Take advantage of our great selection of workshops to help you learn new skills and tools for your library research, academic writing and teaching. To register go to http://www.lib.umn.edu/services/workshops/registration

January 4-8
Introduction to Citation Managers
Learn why you should use a citation manager. This workshop will look at 3 common citation managers, RefWorks, EndNote and Zotero. Their features will be compared so you can decide which citation manager best meets your needs.
Time: Tuesday, 01/05/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 101 Walter Library
 
RefWorks: Basics
Learn the basics of using RefWorks, the Web-based citation manager that is available to all U of M Faculty, students and staff. Adding references to RefWorks will be covered, as well as exporting them to Word, and selecting a style (MLA, APA, etc) for your bibliography. See http://www.lib.umn.edu/refworks/ for more details about RefWorks. This class is available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html
Time: Wednesday, 01/06/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Zotero: Basics
Zotero is a *free* Firefox extension that helps you collect citations and website information from within your Firefox browser. We'll show you how to install Zotero and use it to capture citations, organize your research, and format bibliographies and in-text citations.
This class is available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html
Thu, 01/07/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library


January 11-15

Getting Published: How to Publish Your Science Research Article
This workshop, intended for graduate students and newer faculty in the sciences, will help you identify appropriate journals to which to submit your article and discuss how to manage your rights when signing a contract with a publisher. Join your colleagues to share your ideas and discuss the issues you face as an emerging academic author.
Time: Monday, 01/11/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

RefWorks: Basics
Learn the basics of using RefWorks, the Web-based citation manager that is available to all U of M Faculty, students and staff. Adding references to RefWorks will be covered, as well as exporting them to Word, and selecting a style (MLA, APA, etc) for your bibliography. See http://www.lib.umn.edu/refworks/ for more details about RefWorks. This class is also available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html
Time: Monday, 01/11/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

How do I Know I Found Everything?
Working on a new research project, a thesis or dissertation? Need to be comprehensive in your literature search? Explore ways to approach the search, and identify useful--and perhaps unusual--resources.
Time: Tuesday, 01/12/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

Zotero: Basics
Zotero is a *free* Firefox extension that helps you collect citations and website information from within your Firefox browser. We'll show you how to install Zotero and use it to capture citations, organize your research, and format bibliographies and in-text citations.  This class is also available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html
Time: Tuesday, 01/12/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

EndNote: Basics
An introduction to using EndNote. Learn to import citations, customize your account, and format your bibliographies and in-text citations. We'll also discuss using EndNote in conjunction with EndNoteWeb, a web-based version of EndNote available for free to current University of Minnesota students, faculty, and staff. Find a self-paced online version of this course at http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html.
Time: Tuesday, 01/12/2010 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Creating Posters Using PowerPoint
Getting ready to do a poster at an upcoming conference? Learn pointers about using PowerPoint to create the poster as one giant slide, and send it to a large-scale printer.
Time: Tuesday, 01/12/2010 - 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

Introduction to Data Management for Scientists and Engineers
Digital data is growing at an exponential rate, and the work involved in managing that data is rapidly increasing as well. How can we ensure that our research data will still be available in a usable form in 5, 10, or 20 years? We will discuss why having a data management plan is important as well as key considerations and best practices for data management.
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 11:00am - 12:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Grant Funding for Graduate Students
Find out more about funding opportunities available to graduate students. Learn how to use IRIS, SPIN, and Community of Science and the Foundation Directory to search for grant opportunities. Setting up e-mail updates on specific subjects will also be covered, as well as how to find internal U of M funding sources. Resources for the course are listed on the Web site of the Office of the VP for Research, http://www.collaborate.umn.edu/explore/searching.html.
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 11:00am - 12:15pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 3:00pm - 4:15pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

Google for Researchers
With Google, you already search the web, share photos/movies/music, map directions and discover new things...but there are some tools you may have missed. This web search engine is on a mission to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible." So let's explore the new tools and technology that pair Google-efficient tools with library-quality results to weave together a rich information web that goes beyond just the World Wide Web. We'll look at tools such as, Google Docs, RSS Reader, Google Scholar, and iGoogle Research Gadgets that will help you access, evaluate, and share information in an easy collaborative environment.
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

RefWorks: Advanced
For RefWorks users who would like to learn more about linking to full text documents, editing styles, and other specialized tasks. Attendees are encouraged to bring their RefWorks questions to the session. A list of advanced features may be found at http://courses.lib.umn.edu/page.phtml?page_id=2603
Time: Wednesday, 01/13/2010 - 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

Formatting Your Dissertation or Thesis in *Word 2007*
Focus on your research instead of your formatting! In this workshop, you'll learn how to use Microsoft Word features effectively and efficiently. We'll cover inserting images and charts, getting your page numbers in the right place, generating tables of contents and figures; and more. Please note that this workshop covers the basic formatting you'll need to comply with Graduate School guidelines. Participants should have basic experience using MS Word. Note this version of the workshop specifically uses Office 2007; an instruction manual is available for Word 2003. We will be using a template and not be working with individual dissertations. Class materials can be found on the Moodle page, at: https://moodle.umn.edu/course/view.php?id=5102. This class is available online: http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html.
Thu, 01/14/2010 - 10:00am - 12:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)
Time: Thursday, 01/14/2010 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: 310 Walter Library

EndNote: Basics
An introduction to using EndNote. Learn to import citations, customize your account, and format your bibliographies and in-text citations. We'll also discuss using EndNote in conjunction with EndNoteWeb, a web-based version of EndNote available for free to current University of Minnesota students, faculty, and staff. Find a self-paced online version of this course at http://www.lib.umn.edu/research/instruction/modules/index.html.
Time: Thursday, 01/14/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: Magrath Library Instruction Room (Room 81)

Introduction to Citation Managers
Learn why you should use a citation manager. This workshop will look at 3 common citation managers, RefWorks, EndNote and Zotero. Their features will be compared so you can decide which citation manager best meets your needs.
Time: Friday, 01/15/2010 -  10:30am - 11:30am
Location: S30B Wilson Library

Leveraging Archival Materials into the Curriculum
With a world of materials from art, images, books and reports to maps, blue prints, letters, and more; Archives and Special Collections (http://special.lib.umn.edu/) at the U will broaden a student's experience in any class. This workshop will help faculty and instructors to navigate the logistics of using archival material in your instruction. Get ideas for the possibilities of using primary materials to enrich the classroom experience. A tour will be offered at the end of the workshop.
Time: Fri, 01/15/2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 120b Andersen Library



Great example of the stuff we got

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How could this be used in instruction?

Using Twitter to relive history

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I came across this and I am strangely interested.

"Welcome to TwHistory. We believe that history is filled with exciting stories. We also believe twhistory.jpgthat these stories can be told through Twitter; through the people who lived and experienced them. We go through journals, diaries, letters, and other original sources to deliver the day-to-day lives of people who lived through some of histories most exciting times. We broadcast this information through Twitter, and feel this is a new and exciting approach to understanding history. Instead of reading about a month-long campaign in a few hours, you experience it over the course of a month in small 140 character 'Tweets'."

Examples include:

  • Gettysburg
  • Cuban Missile Crisis

Learn more: http://www.twhistory.com/ or watch a Prezi about it (http://prezi.com/u844gbe1oi34/)


How could this be used in Library instruction?

I wonder if you could modify this so people would take on "types of sources" and have them tweet about what would be published about an event.

Container-neutral?

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The All-Digital Library? Not Quite Yet


http://chronicle.com/blogPost/The-All-Digital-Library-Not/9215/

"...not everybody's ready to pull the plug on print. "Given the needs of the humanities in particular, it just wouldn't be feasible at the present moment" for libraries to go all-digital..."

"The conversations Ms. Spiro and Ms. Henry had with librarians also revealed how the culture of librarianship is evolving. They found evidence of a "container-neutral approach," in which it doesn't really matter how information is packaged, as long as it can easily be found by or delivered to users."

This seems to me to present some interesting challenges to instruction--as much of it is based on the container. In face, that is often the first question we start with on the reference desk? "Do you need a book or article?"

Seems like more of a focus on critical evaluation and helping to guide students on selecting materials that are appropriate for their topic/assignment and less on container/searching. But are students ready? Are we or our systems ready? What do you think?
 



Reactions to Planning Speaker series--Paul Courant

I really like this continuum from information to knowledge to wisdom.

__here is a bit from the article Wendy used in the introduction___

courant.jpg

Courant said he predicts the University Library will use converted files to make materials even more digitally accessible in the future.

"In a few years, most of what I expect will be in the library (will be) in a form where you'll be able to load it into something that looks like a Kindle or a Sony Reader and read it very easily," he said.

He added that the stacks will eventually disappear.

With this shift, Courant said the role of universities and libraries will become increasingly important as society moves into the "information age," where loads of information are available at people's fingertips.

"The problem of converting information into knowledge and knowledge into wisdom is every bit as important as it always was," he said. "The University is the place that's going to figure out how to do that, and within it, the library is going to be the place in the University that figures that out."

http://www.michigandaily.com/content/evolution-paul-courant-reshapes-concept-library?page=0,1

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Bottom Line:
publishing very important
peer review very important but the two don't need to be connected

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Interesting to think about how you would teach about evaluation with different guideposts than journal title, reputation, impact factor, etc.

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Like the ideas of copyright--I get very impatient when this comes up with talking about copyright in teaching or scholarly works--at least when it stands in the way of accomplishing things
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What role do we have to teach about Open Access--to faculty, to best target? e.g. future faculty? future scientists? future teachers? everyone?
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OIT's Pecha Kucha

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Check out the recording of the recent 20 by 20: An OIT Pecha Kucha Event about Google@UMN

If you don't know "Pecha Kucha (pronounced "peh-CHAK-cha") presentations are narrated slideshows that are meant to be concise, informative, and entertaining. Pecha kucha means "chit chat" or "the sound of conversation" in Japanese and was developed by two architects from Tokyo who were fed up with bad PowerPoint presentations. Presentations move quickly as each presenter narrates 20 slides that are displayed for 20 seconds each." Crazy!

The whole thing is good (see the complete program) but here are the Library folks:

  • Shane Nackerud--Google Wave (starts at ~46:00)
  • Jon and Kate--Google for Researchers (~53:00)
  • Jason Roy--Google Book Search, Haiti Trust and Digitization (~60:00)
  • Nancy Sims--Google | Engineering | Copyright (~67:30)




What do you think?
newstrust.jpgnewstrust2.jpgTake a look:http://newstrust.net/
I think this would be an interesting model for a class assignment/blog. If you had a themed class you could have students build a class bibliography/blog and then have them "rate" the quality of each story. It would be interesting if you could somehow give it a cumulative score so multiple students could give input. I also like how these are categorized (e.g. world, opinion, etc.)--you could do the same by type (academic, popular, etc.) or author (scholar, journalist, etc.)




Oh dear...blogging on blogging

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"Don't knock blogging - it's the answer to our literacy problems"

"New research shows that almost 50 per cent of schoolchildren say writing is boring. The solution, discovers Hilary Wilce, is to let them loose with digital technology"

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/schools/dont-knock-blogging-ndash-its-the-answer-to-our-literacy-problems-1832593.html

Prezi?

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prezi.jpg Has anyone used this or heard about it?

http://prezi.com/

I trip across it today and would love to hear if anyone knows more about it or more importantly has used it?

I recently watched the Blended Librarians Webinar, "Collaborating With Faculty on IL Instruction: Using Visual Methods to Enhance Student Learning" about a sociology professor and librarian at Indiana University who created an assignment on creating concept maps and drawing connections with the literature they found in the class. Helped for students to think about organizing information and evaluating.

Here are a couple of examples and stuff that came up in the discussion:
infographic.jpg27+ Beautiful Examples of Infographics
"Infographics refers to visual representations of information, data or knowledge. These graphics are used where complex information needs to be explained quickly and clearly, such as in signs, maps, journalism, technical writing, and education."

Sketchcast
"Record a sketch with or without voice. Explain something, have fun, or create art."

Visual Understanding Environment
Open Source project based at Tufts University. The VUE project is focused on creating flexible tools for managing and integrating digital resources in support of teaching, learning and research. VUE provides a flexible visual environment for structuring, presenting, and sharing digital information.


TED Talks: Hans Rosling shows the best stats you've ever seen

Welcome

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We look forward to the upcoming discussions.

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