katep: April 2011 Archives

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Jakob Nielsen's Alertbox, April 11, 2011  

Very interesting, short article about strategies in web searching and its effect on problem solving. How does this apply to library searching? How can we help students search/problem solve better?

Here are a few quotes:

  • the rough estimate from our available data is obvious: users change search strategy only 1% of the time; 99% of the time they plod along a single unwavering path. Whether the true number is 2% or 0.5%, the big-picture conclusion is the same: users have extraordinarily inadequate research skills when it comes to solving problems on the Web.It also highlights a big problem with search today: it doesn't facilitate any conceptual knowledge because it relies on quick in-out dips into websites.
  • In general, we almost never see people use advanced search. And when they do, they typically use it incorrectly -- partly because they use it so rarely that they never really learn how it works.
  • For today's Web design projects, we must design for the way the world is, not the way we wish it were. This means accepting search dominance, and trying to help users with poor research skills.

The Everywhere Library

presented by the Academic and Research Libraries Division in partnership with the Public Libraries Division of the Minnesota Library Association

Last year, Academic and Research Libraries (ARLD) Day was all about getting users into the library building. This year, we'll look at serving our patrons where they are. We know they work from their computers at home and in their offices, but they're also increasingly accessing our services and information via mobile devices. What do libraries need to be thinking about? What services are successful? What technologies and metadata are required to make access easy and understandable? Join us on April 29 at ARLD Day 2011: The Everywhere Library to find out.

Keynote speaker

Jason GriffeyJason Griffey
Associate Professor and Head of Library Information Technology at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

The Everywhere Patron
Throughout the world, the majority of people who have access to the Internet are not using a computer. They are relying on their cell phone as their primary interface for listening to music, watching television, reading books, communicating with friends, and finding answers. As phones become more and more capable, fewer and fewer people find that they need their computer on a day to day basis to stay in touch with their infosphere. Libraries need to be at the forefront of these changes, as well as looking forward and preparing for the future of information interaction.

We will examine the upcoming rise of the superphone, the next-generation of mobile phone services, and how the next 3-5 years will reshape everything about information interactions.

Keynote speaker links to check out:



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New article from the researchers from Project Information Literacy.


  • So have Facebook and Google become the bibles for college students? 
  • Do young people rely on social media and search engines for all of the answers needed in their daily lives? 
In a new research paper from PIL, we found students use online information for decisions in their personal lives, but rely almost as much on family and friends nearly as much. 

The everyday life research study includes results of a new statistical analysis about what we call "ubiquitous search engine usage"--when search engines are most likely to be used--and not used--during students' everyday life information-seeking activities. 

 

Read "How College Students Use the Web to Conduct Everyday Life Research" in this month's issue of First Monday, an international journal about Internet research.

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This page is an archive of recent entries written by katep in April 2011.

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