Recently in Online learning Category

This "interactive photo" is a unique learning object--I think it is very effective with the short videos with the photo being the navigation: http://giving.umn.edu/extras/UniversityArchives/

It would be interesting to give a "tour" of one of the databases this way--e.g. here is how you put your search into the box, here are subject headings and why you use them, etc.

Or to show an article and paper and give the back story of the research or citations.

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This will be an interesting experiment:

Sarah Rich (September 19, 2012). New School: A Tumblr for Making Your Own Textbooks. The Atlantic. Retrieved from http://www.theatlantic.com/ on September 20, 2012.

"Currently, Scott explains, "professors that are really trying to push the edge and combine textbooks with technology are hacking together all these solutions. You see Wordpress blogs for course materials ... and then there's this problem: in order to teach the majority of college courses, you need copyrighted content and textbooks. There's no good way to merge all of the cool stuff, like Khan Academy, and all this other stuff together into one solution.""

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"Ginkgo Tree presents an intuitive, visual interface, not unlike Tumblr's dashboard. For each course and subject, professors can upload links and images, embed video, post comments, and -- significantly -- import a chunk of scanned pages from print books. All of those resources get bundled into modules and arrayed in a navigable grid."

What is the role of libraries in helping faculty and instructors develop their own course materials? 

This new project has been getting a lot of buzz in the late couple of days:


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New: Unglue.it. "The site uses a crowd-sourced funding (or "crowdfunding") model to raise enough money to pay book authors to open up their books as ebooks for free. As described on the site:

Unglue.it is a a place for individuals and institutions to join together to give their favorite ebooks to the world. We work with rights holders to decide on fair compensation for releasing a free, legal edition of their already-published books, under Creative Commons licensing. Then everyone pledges toward that sum. When the threshold is reached (and not before), we collect the pledged funds and we pay the rights holders. They issue an unglued digital edition; you're free to read and share it, with everyone, on the device of your choice, worldwide.

This follows the model of sites like Kickstarter.com, where individuals pledge various amounts to support projects. Like KickStarter, Unglue.it offers various rewards pegged at specific pledge amounts as compensation to contributors. Also like KickStarter, each book "campaign" on Unglue.it has an end date."


I remember the speaker at the Library Tech Conference saying that Kickstarter has raised more money for projects than the National Endowment for the Arts or similar funding type agencies so it seems like a likely model.

So...should libraries channel funding from collecting a book to supporting its change to open ebook? 

Beyond Moodle?

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Thoughts on a Post-LMS World:
http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Review/EDUCAUSEReviewMagazineVolume47/APostLMSWorld/244412
from EDUCAUSE Review

"The exponential growth of open source, a new age of interoperable systems, and the increasing demand for e-learning solutions have converged to make the time right for a new kind of LMS."

"In this new LMS environment, a faculty member is a learning architect (the future) as opposed to a learning manager (the present). The LMS 3.0 world will adapt to the art of teaching as opposed to faculty having to adapt to a particular technology."

"Content used for enrichment as well as remediation can be subscribed and syndicated to student learning profiles in ways we cannot accomplish today. In the new LMS world, institutions will be able to shape the component architecture to the individual needs of the program, course, or learner."

Essential Components:
  • Learning Grids
  • E-Learning Intelligence
  • Content Clouds
  • Open Architecture
Below is a recap and link to recording of the Instructional Design Show & Tell held March 2, 2012. 

Instructional Design Show & Tell
March 2, 2012
Description: View some of the current projects being worked on by the Libraries Instruction Design Team - Paul Zenke, Andrew Palahniuk, and intern Ian O'Neill.  From an infographic on poster design to a Research introduction to a virtual world game prototype based on the history of the Bohemian Flats, this informal show-and-tell will have time for questions and will inspire you to consider new ideas for elearning and sharing your content and expertise with users.

View recording: https://umconnect.umn.edu/p30842250/ (Note: Audio starts at 2 minutes)

Recap:
  • All projects are a combination of with learning objectives, instructional activities and assessments.
1. Poster Design Poster/Simulationposterjudging.jpg

2. Face-to-Face Workshop (What the World Knows About You: Online Identity and Privacy with Social Media)
  • Worked on needs assessment and learner assessment 
  • Used pre-survey
  • Authentic activity was to look up partner in the workshop to see how much information you can find
  • Practiced for staff and changed tailored it more to students based on feedback
3. Medium as Message 
  • Updated technology and add new features 
  • Originally created in Pachyderm/flash, but need to change delivery as Pachyderm no longer supported. Original tool limited text and was hard for users to get additional content.  Created in HTML5 (not in Flash so it could be viewed on mobile device)
  • Also hope to add quizzes and additional interactivity in the future
  • Beta:  http://vader.lib.umn.edu/ampala/ASCMaM/ASCMaM.html
4. Demo iphone game based on the Bohemian Flats 
  • Created using ARIS during design jamARIS_quests.jpg
  • Choose your own adventure/quest 
  • Augmented reality--so if you have your mobile device and are standing on Washington Ave Bridge you will see an overlay of historic photos.

To work with Paul and the Instructional Design team, simply send an email to pfzenke@umn.edu.

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