Undergraduate Research: March 2012 Archives

Below is a recap and link to recording of the Instructional Design Show & Tell held March 2, 2012. 

Instructional Design Show & Tell
March 2, 2012
Description: View some of the current projects being worked on by the Libraries Instruction Design Team - Paul Zenke, Andrew Palahniuk, and intern Ian O'Neill.  From an infographic on poster design to a Research introduction to a virtual world game prototype based on the history of the Bohemian Flats, this informal show-and-tell will have time for questions and will inspire you to consider new ideas for elearning and sharing your content and expertise with users.

View recording: https://umconnect.umn.edu/p30842250/ (Note: Audio starts at 2 minutes)

Recap:
  • All projects are a combination of with learning objectives, instructional activities and assessments.
1. Poster Design Poster/Simulationposterjudging.jpg

2. Face-to-Face Workshop (What the World Knows About You: Online Identity and Privacy with Social Media)
  • Worked on needs assessment and learner assessment 
  • Used pre-survey
  • Authentic activity was to look up partner in the workshop to see how much information you can find
  • Practiced for staff and changed tailored it more to students based on feedback
3. Medium as Message 
  • Updated technology and add new features 
  • Originally created in Pachyderm/flash, but need to change delivery as Pachyderm no longer supported. Original tool limited text and was hard for users to get additional content.  Created in HTML5 (not in Flash so it could be viewed on mobile device)
  • Also hope to add quizzes and additional interactivity in the future
  • Beta:  http://vader.lib.umn.edu/ampala/ASCMaM/ASCMaM.html
4. Demo iphone game based on the Bohemian Flats 
  • Created using ARIS during design jamARIS_quests.jpg
  • Choose your own adventure/quest 
  • Augmented reality--so if you have your mobile device and are standing on Washington Ave Bridge you will see an overlay of historic photos.

To work with Paul and the Instructional Design team, simply send an email to pfzenke@umn.edu.

Improve the search tools!

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Google-Trained Minds Can't Deal with Terrible Research Database UI from the Atlantic by Alan Jacobs is the Clyde S. Kilby Professor of English at Wheaton College

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"Not long ago I was using a research database to try to get a PDF of an article published in a journal to which my college's library has a digital subscription. I knew the title of the article, the author's name, the title of the journal, and the issue date. I plugged all those in to the appropriate text boxes, clicked "search" . . . and got hundreds of results. But the one that I wanted wasn't on the first several pages.

I sent an email to a reference librarian describing this event, and he wrote back saying, "Oh, see, you should have entered the journal's ISSN." Really? Exact title of article and journal, exact name of author, exact date of publication -- that's not enough?"


"There's no question that students' search skills are generally quite poor, and need to get better, but to some extent we've all had our search habits trained by Google's algorithms, which in most cases -- though by no means all -- are quite effective."


"So maybe our greater emphasis shouldn't be on training users to work with bad search tools, but to improve the search tools. Especially since serious research questions aren't as afflicted by spammy
SEO as many other queries, by this point in the development of online life we ought to be doing a lot better than we are."

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries in the Undergraduate Research category from March 2012.

Undergraduate Research: January 2012 is the previous archive.

Undergraduate Research: July 2012 is the next archive.

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