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Welcome

Welcome to ENGL 1701. Each week, we will be making posts on the blog about our assigned readings. Each student will be expected to make a post of approximately 150-200 words and it will be due an hour before the start of the Tuesday lecture. In addition, I'm asking that everyone responds to at least one blog post before we meet for our discussion section.

Here's some ideas for what to write about:

1)Questions you have about the reading. Did a character act in an unexpected way, did the plot take a turn you didn't anticipate?

2)Compare and contrast the readings. How does our reading of "Beloved" connect with "The Road?" How do "Maus" and "Fun Home" use the graphic novel form to convey different meanings?

3)Connect the readings to your life/educational experience. Look for ways to connect these books of "fiction" to our culture and society. For example, how does "Maus" line up with the way the Holocaust is taught in a history course? Which is more effective?

4)Anything else you can think of! We can use these blogs in a creative/fun way, just make sure to bring up a good discussion point or two that will get our class room discussions going.

Comments

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One of the most impressive aspects of The Road was how it made me question what I would do in that world. Specifically the charred infant, on page 198, struck a chord with me. I can’t see myself cooking a human baby or eating any person for that matter. Yet, I can see how years of living in that desolation with the daily option of resorting to cannibalism for mere survival could change someone’s perspective. Is it a person with weak self-control, who resorts to cannibalism? Or is it a person with weak fortitude, who can’t bring themselves to doing something so gruesome? Is it weak to commit suicide to escape that hell? Or is it weak to hang on to that last strain of life to avoid death? The book constantly raises these questions, but there isn’t a clear answer to any of them. The way the Cormac McCarthy did that was truly masterful. The theme of “carrying the fire? was cool and also well done. I believe that “carrying the fire? symbolized the boy and the man holding on to their humanity, which nicely references to Greek mythology where Prometheus gives fire to mankind.

One of the most impressive aspects of The Road was how it made me question what I would do in that world. Specifically the charred infant, on page 198, struck a chord with me. I can’t see myself cooking a human baby or eating any person for that matter. Yet, I can see how years of living in that desolation with the daily option of resorting to cannibalism for mere survival could change someone’s perspective. Is it a person with weak self-control, who resorts to cannibalism? Or is it a person with weak fortitude, who can’t bring themselves to doing something so gruesome? Is it weak to commit suicide to escape that hell? Or is it weak to hang on to that last strain of life to avoid death? The book constantly raises these questions, but there isn’t a clear answer to any of them. The way the Cormac McCarthy did that was truly masterful. The theme of “carrying the fire? was cool and also well done. I believe that “carrying the fire? symbolized the boy and the man holding on to their humanity, which nicely references to Greek mythology where Prometheus gives fire to mankind.

One of the best aspects of McCarthy’s The Road is his ability to mimic the novel’s themes with its language and grammar. His post-apocalyptic world is vast, endless, gray; the lack of defined chapters highlights this setting. On a rather subconscious level, this puts the reader in the same situation, in a sense of confusion and loss. Furthermore, the absence of grammatical punctuation detracts from the importance of dialogue, the absence of capitalization does the same to proper thoughts. For instance, “spanish? in lieu of Spanish begins to imply that the language no longer maintains its stature and prominence. This also holds true with the nameless characters. While naming them would place emphasis on their person, their ambiguity places that emphasis instead on their actions. We become detached, relatively, from the character as a whole and are more entrapped by the situation that unfolds over the course of the novel.

One of the best aspects of McCarthy’s The Road is his ability to mimic the novel’s themes with its language and grammar. His post-apocalyptic world is vast, endless, gray; the lack of defined chapters highlights this setting. On a rather subconscious level, this puts the reader in the same situation, in a sense of confusion and loss. Furthermore, the absence of grammatical punctuation detracts from the importance of dialogue, the absence of capitalization does the same to proper thoughts. For instance, “spanish? in lieu of Spanish begins to imply that the language no longer maintains its stature and prominence. This also holds true with the nameless characters. While naming them would place emphasis on their person, their ambiguity places that emphasis instead on their actions. We become detached, relatively, from the character as a whole and are more entrapped by the situation that unfolds over the course of the novel.

Good blog! I truly love how it is simple on my eyes and the data are well written. I'm wondering how I could be notified whenever a new post has been made. I've subscribed to your RSS which must do the trick! Have a nice day!