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Week 4: Beggar Maid/ Dubliners

1: Since we didn't get a chance to talk about everyone's group question/discussion on Tuesday, you can post your Beggar Maid question and discuss the different points and opinions found in your group.

2: Dubliners is like the Beggar Maid in that it is a collection of short stories brought together around central ideas and themes that (hopefully) come together to equal a novel. The diffierence is Dubliners focuses around more characters, but all in roughly the same time-frame. Do you see this structure as an effective one? Why or why not?

3: There's a lot of big themes coming up in these first few stories, including death, religion, and children (especially their relationships with older people). Maybe expand and explain what's happening with one or more of these themes.

4: A lot of these stories are intentionally ambiguous, and there's a lot that can be read into these stories. Particularly the endings. James Joyce is known for "epiphanies" in his stories. What do you think of the use of epiphanies?

5: Anything else you can think of? Write away!

Comments

James Joyce’s Dubliners and Alice Munro’s The Beggar Maid are structurally similar. Though they are both constructed from disjointed short stories, Joyce’s work makes better use of this technique. In The Beggar Maid, all the stories focus around a few central characters in an attempt to coalesce them into a novel. Joyce makes little attempt at unifying each of the stories. Though each of the parts of this novel is set in Dublin, the characters and plotlines are different in each story. I found that by allowing the reader to take a unique theme away from each of the stories it was easier to handle the reading. Throughout The Beggar Maid I was waiting for the stories to come together and make sense collectively. With Dubliners, the author does not imply by using similar characters and scenes that the stories have anything to do with one another.

Another reason I found Dubliners much more enjoyable than The Beggar Maid was the content itself. After reading The Road and Waiting for the Barbarians I was in the mindset of grand themes of morality. The themes in The Beggar Maid were frivolous in comparison with these two novels we read earlier; Rose was just a girl trying to grow up. When read alongside the themes of religion and death in Dubliners, Rose’s story is painfully dull.

‘The Beggar Maid’ question I wanted to have answered was the second one. It asked what kind of a person did Rose turn out to be. I think Rose turned out to be an actress who did not become as successful as she wished but made a living out of it. She probably stayed single because she never knew what a healthy relationship consisted of. I am thinking Rose ended up staying around her home town and did not amount to anything great.
The question I asked my group in return was of all the characters, who had the greatest influence on her end character. We decided that the men she dated had the greatest influence. She always thought that one night stands would end up staying around. When they did not, Rose tried to find some way to improve her own character. We decided that her childhood influenced these thoughts. Rose’s father and Flo did not have the most loving relationship. He needed Flo to take care of the kids and Flo needed somewhere to belong. They fit together but did not love one another as society thinks people should love each other.
‘Dubliners’ is set up much like ‘The Beggar Maid’ with the short stories all rolled into one book. ‘Dubliners’ is more sequential though. All the stories fit well together and there is less of a time gap between the stories. As far as I have read in ‘Dubliners’ the boy is a well-rounded student who likes causing mischief with his friends. The characters fit together well. The writing techniques remind me of ‘The Road,’ with the simplicity. There are no quotation marks. Instead, Joyce uses hyphens to let the reader know when someone new is speaking.

My question for Tuesday's class was the fourth one, which was, "Why do you think the stories are arranged in this order?" I thought that as a whole, the story did move chronologically. Sure there were flashback and forwards, but as we progressed through the book, Rose was indeed getting older. My follow up question was basically another question she had posted up, which was, "With the way they were arranged, do you think they created a whole story, or a collection of short stories?" From my last point, I think that they did in fact form a whole story.
Two other things about 'The Beggar Maid':
First, in the middle/later stories of the book, Flo was nearly non-existent. Professor Fitzgerald said that she thought the book was not necessarily about Rose, but of Rose and Flo's relationship. I don’t really agree with this because I honestly nearly forgot about Flo during these later stories. Maybe there was an indirect relationship going on in those stories?
Next, I actually liked how Munroe wrote this book- with little ‘short stories’. I saw them as sort of “prerequisites for classes?. You take your knowledge from different stories (or classes) and use them for a big idea (one’s major). After reading the book, we got an excellent, big idea of who Rose was as a person.

Honestly, I do not understand this book at all. The main character gives us very vivid details of his different experiences and accouters with others, yet I cannot seem to grasp a sense of who the narrator is as a person. Yes, he does grant us the opportunity to explore his inner thoughts numerous times, but I just do not see the connection between his different emotions and the different events he recounts to us. This is more than likely because I cannot relate to his experiences and I am sure after I plunge deeper into the text I will appreciate Joyce’s work more. The most confusing part of the novel so far for me is the section titled Araby. I don’t get the relationship formed between him and the women. I’m also quite confused by the emotions in the final paragraph. Why does he describe himself as “a creature driven and derided by vanity?? While I cannot seem to make sense of the novel I do adore the time and effort that Joyce took to describe Dublin in the details that she did. When a setting is described I can totally picture every aspect of that place. I see and smell every detail theses characters, I can fully imagine this people and the book comes to life. The detail in this book is great and I cannot wait to read the rest.

Honestly, I do not understand this book at all. The main character gives us very vivid details of his different experiences and accouters with others, yet I cannot seem to grasp a sense of who the narrator is as a person. Yes, he does grant us the opportunity to explore his inner thoughts numerous times, but I just do not see the connection between his different emotions and the different events he recounts to us. This is more than likely because I cannot relate to his experiences and I am sure after I plunge deeper into the text I will appreciate Joyce’s work more. The most confusing part of the novel so far for me is the section titled Araby. I don’t get the relationship formed between him and the women. I’m also quite confused by the emotions in the final paragraph. Why does he describe himself as “a creature driven and derided by vanity?? While I cannot seem to make sense of the novel I do adore the time and effort that Joyce took to describe Dublin in the details that she did. When a setting is described I can totally picture every aspect of that place. I see and smell every detail theses characters, I can fully imagine this people and the book comes to life. The detail in this book is great and I cannot wait to read the rest.

Obviously, The Beggar Maid and Dubliners have a very similar short story structure. However, I feel like in The Beggar Maid the end of each short story gave away a large part of what was going to happen later on in the book. I have not read very far in Dubliners, but so far it seems that it is not the case. I like Dubliners a lot more already, only having read a few of the short stories. It is so mysterious and there is so much left open for interpretation that I think it is engaging, and it keeps me wanting to read more. Also I think the slang and dialect is cool and adds to the whole setting and theme of the story. What do you think the boy’s relationship was with him and the priest? I think Joyce’s writing style is very cool and unique, and I find the fact that he uses epiphanies intriguing. I am looking forward to reading more of it. So far I have noticed that older people interacting with younger people is a quite common theme in Dubliners. I am not exactly sure yet what themes are present or revolve around this. They seem to be awkward interactions.

The question I chose during Tuesday’s lecture was the second one: What kind of person does Rose turn out to be? Although my group wasn’t able to reach a concise answer to this question, we were able to discuss some interesting points. First of all, although Rose is arguably a successful actress, she feels a certain sense of failure that isn’t fully explained. We raised the question, then - is she satisfied with who she has become? We felt that even though, by the end of the book, she seems resigned to all the events in her life that shaped her into the woman she is, the book’s ending isn’t necessarily a happy one. Rose is a very needy person, and that trait doesn’t seem to change throughout the course of the book. I feel as if she is constantly pursuing a sense of belonging: she leaves home, goes through all these different relationships, and eventually returns to her roots, but she doesn’t seem any happier for her experiences. We also agreed that the relationships Rose pursues seem superficial and transitory: her marriage to Patrick, her various affairs with married men, even her ‘relationship’ with Ralph Gillespie, to whom she apparently felt the deepest connection of all.

The theme of death does seem to pop up in this book. For example, in the first story “The Sisters,? is a story focused around the death/paralysis of a religious minister. The very beginning of Eveline shows death as see remembers the deaths of friends and family members which is kind of depressing for the beginning of a short story. I have only done the required amount of reading but have noticed that the last chapter in the book is called “The Dead.? I mentioned the word paralysis because it seems that many of the characters suffer either a mundane lifestyle or are in search for one. For example, Eveline is leaving her lover to get back to her original home and lifestyle and in the story “Araby?, the boy’s adventure to the bazaar seemed to always be delayed; first from his uncle for showing up late, and then the train was delayed. Overall, I am not a huge fan of all this death and numbness because it is kind of depressing. It seems like all of the characters in the story are in an unhappy state of their lifetime. I think for the rest of the stories, I am really going to be hoping that something fortunate happens to the main characters.

The Beggar Maid seemed to have a lot less to talk about than Dubliners. I personally like Dubliners a lot better because of the language and maybe because of the fact that it's not about a female character. The Dubliners story line is easier to relate to because of the mysterious and engaging characters that are portrayed in int. The Beggar Maid had a lot of characters who were somewhat weird and always seemed to be doing something unusual. Dubliners has a lot of cool relationships between characters like the Priest and the boy, where the Priest teaches the boy many things. James Joyce does a great job with his word use that makes me feel like I'm in the story and being guided through the place, not watching form a top-down view. Also, through the first few stories, I like Dubliners a lot more than I did through the first three stories of The Beggar Maid. I was wondering what everyone thought of the smile of the priest that the boy described. I wasn't really sure what the whole "tongue on lower lip" thing really meant. I thought about it for a little bit to see if I could come up with a reason for James Joyce to describe the smile of the priest and the reason that he said it was unusual. I was blanking on a reason, so I'm guessing that I have to read more of the book to find the explanation for that smile. Overall I'm enjoying reading Dubliners.

The question that I came up with for the in class discussion was which story was your least favorite. I think my response came off as rude, however I feel like it was not fully explained. The first story simply bored me. I understand the need of the first story for the purpose of character development, however it was simply dry and full of what I thought to be unnecessary detail. Once I got past that point, however, the book became much more interesting. Rose’s character took shape very quickly and the character of Flo became more friendly and motherly than was previously seen in the book. I especially liked the parts in the story that described her time in college, because while I am on the other side of life, being one of those people singing ridiculous songs at football games, I found it to be a very good portrayal of what college life is like.

My chosen question was the last one where we are asked about the book being a compilation of short stories or a novel. My question to that was if it was effective to show the theme in short stories. My group had mixed emotions whether it was effective. We had two main arguments. Saying that the short story projection of the theme works since it can possibly be shown in different ways and multiple times (repetition is the mother of learning). This argument I thought to be the one I agreed with more. The other group members said they would prefer a novel instead of short stories. Although the characters remain mostly the same (main ones), it is kind of hard to keep up with the constantly changing social situation and is confusing at times. The confusion causes one to lose focus from the main theme. Although I think the theme/central idea is better portrayed through a series of short stories, I prefer novels because I can get more involved into the characters’ lives and be more attached. When I have this attachment is when I enjoy a book or story. Sometimes the short stores are nice though for a quick read. (Note: whenever I specify a time frame, it isn’t necessarily accurate. I tend to exaggerate and stereotype for every blog) I might also not enjoy this book as much as a novel since I do not find interest in the plot that much.

I wanted to repost on Beggar Maid because I think I was a bit unfair in my previous post. Although after finishing the book I do still think the content is geared towards feminine audiences, I appreciate Munro's writing style much more. I think Munro has a very good sense of what her stories are about and although they seemed superfluous at the beginning, her prose seemed more and more necessary to me as I read. It's not so much her stories that I found interesting, but the way she pulled all her images together. Each chapter had its own conflict, its own characters, and its own setting, but Rose's character grew with each story. We had some debate about whether Rose was the main character or Flo was or both; I think it must be Rose. Each story built chronologically the life of Rose's character, her experiences, her thoughts, her reactions to those experiences, and how each experience shaped her. By the end, the reader has a real sense of the character and her life and it is so personal and real that the reader can't help but feel this book is more like a James Frey memoir than fiction.

There is also the debate over whether or not this is to be considered a novel. For me, it most definitely was. Just because Munro didn't name each story "Chapter 1", "Chapter 2", "Chapter 3" doesn't mean that the stories are inconsistent or the themes are so variously arrayed that they have no central core that binds them like a novel would. If you compare this to a real book of short stories, take In Our Time by Hemingway for example, Munro's stories are much more coherently connected than a hodgepodge of selected writings. There is a strict chronology of events that all include Rose and all have the motifs of Flo, pitiful male characters, internal/external struggles, naivety/knowledge struggles, etc. How would that be any different from a novel? If anything it is more focused than a novel since it concentrates on one character and her thoughts and experiences. I rescind my harsh critique of Munro as a lesbian fembot; I think she actually has some talent in her pen.

At first, I was a bit skeptical of the way in which Alice Munro organized this “novel? into short stories with little linear connection. But, after thinking about it, I now like the way in which the book was organized.

In a novel like “Waiting for the Barbarians? or “The Road? the linear, chronological order to the book can limit the depth of the narrators views and opinions. The narrator in these books has a kind of one-sided system of beliefs. The only chance for the reader to see change in these characters is through their actions. In “The Beggar Maid? though, the organization of the novel allows us to interpret Rose’s thoughts, feelings, and actions in several situations independently of the other stories. I really enjoy this organization of the novel because it reads in the same manner that a diary would. Rose’s thoughts and belief structures change as she encounters different situations and different relationships in her life. This organizational structure is very effective in highlighting the changes in the narrator and the changes in the narrator’s system of beliefs.

I personally am a big fan of epiphanies. The first thing that comes to mind when I think about epiphanies is the TV show “House.? It gives stories a bit of randomness that can be refreshing. No one wants to read a book when you know the ending, or when there is no motivation to keep reading. If I don’t care about the conclusion the character may eventually reach, I’m not going to keep reading/watching. That being said, I do think writers should avoid relying upon Deus Ex Machina too much. Epiphanies can be effective, but only when they are derived from the plot that has already been laid out. A completely random thought that doesn’t build upon the story that has already been presented can ruin the entire plot.

On an unrelated topic, I personally would hate these stories if I had to read them one at a time, as they were first published in magazines back in the day. I imagine it would be very frustrating to the readers.

At Tuesday’s lecture question, I chose the fourth one: “Why do you think the stories are arranged in this order?? The story doesn’t show the entire story of Rose’s life, but it shows important parts of her life what makes and shows her character. The stories are in the order as Rose grows up. There are gaps between the stories which makes you imagine and guess what could have happen to Rose in that period. It makes you feel like you are really hearing a story from someone and get to know the person. When you here a story from someone they don’t tell all of their life, but they just tell the important or exciting episode of their life.
The most favorite next question in our group was “Could the stories be arranged in different order?? Some said it could and some said it couldn’t. Someone said that as the stories are in the order as she grows up so it would not be good to change the orders. And someone said that some of the stories can’t be changed, that they have to be in that position, but some of them are better in different order by changing them.

It is true that there are big themes such as death, religion, and children, are embedded in the short stories of Dubliner. For example in the first story, “the sisters?, reveals the shock that death has on us. Mr. Duffy faced the priest’s death but didn’t know how to feel about it, however he thought about his doings after knowing about Sinico’s death. Also religion is somehow tied to death and afterlife of Dubliners. The impact of Father Flynn on the boy was ambiguous to me because on one had he said that the he taught the boy lessons and was planning on making him a priest but on the other hand he had a creepy dream about him that made him uncomfortable about him. I also wanted to add that it was well put when the author mentioned paralysis and how the boy remembered this word whenever he passed Flynn’s house; same experiment happened to me when my great grandmother died.


The Beggar Maid question I had was, what was your favorite story and why? Most of the people in my group didn’t like many of them and some didn’t read much of them. I liked Wild Swans because it goes into the character of Rose. I found it ridiculous that she was so stubborn and didn’t move the priests hand from her leg. The group and I came to the consensus that she wanted to experience the world on her own and not through what Flo told her.
I think that the structure of Dubliners and The Beggar Maid are effective. It helps the reader break down what the author wants to say piece by piece so that they can get a better understanding of the themes in the book.
I also like Dubliners much more than The Beggar Maid even though they have the same structure. Dubliners has more consistent flow to it and the stories are easier to follow. The boy seems to be a student who is seeking adventure and is bored with his studies.

I don’t think that Dubliners and The Beggar Maid are set up similarly at all, although I have not read very far into Dubliners. While the Beggar Maid was made up of short stories, it still felt like a novel to me. The order in which they were presented made sense to me, and I could figure out the timeline. Dubliners, however, does not yet feel like a novel to me at all. I don’t see a connection in the stories, and the characters aren’t constant like they were in the Beggar Maid.
I also wanted to talk about the language of Dubliners. I find the endless detail to be tiresome, especially all the notes made explaining the various streets and landscapes of Ireland. I am wondering if there is a reason for it, because I personally think that I would get just as much out of the stories if they were less detailed. All of the intricate wording takes away from the emotion that should be present in the book, and makes it seem very objective and distanced.

So far, Dubliners has been a continuous clusterfu** of stories. (Excuse my French) In relation to the Beggar Maid the main characters (Rose/Flo) are the featured in every “short story.?As for Dubliners, new characters are brought up in each story. Reading the story feels like picking up a newspaper and reading about some far away place that I have had no contact or knowledge about. Although this style is very ambiguous and sometimes frustrating to follow, it may surprisingly become a fascinating story about the city of Dublin. What better way to get to know a city than from the people that have lived in it there whole life. That’s what I feel that Joyce is trying to get across to all readers. Dublin is filled with love, loss, happiness, and rebirth. This makes the city ambiguous, but beautiful. So to answer question two, I find that in the end, the structural development of the book will be very unique to the author’s portrayal of Dublin. If you are looking for a book with high tension and big mysteries, as evident in books like The Road and anything written by Dan Brown, you might as well put it back on the shelf and pick up The Da Vinci Code. But Joyce’s perspective of ambiguity is refreshing. Even if it’s a clusterfu** story.

So, we’re on the second novel composed of short stories. I have to say, I enjoy this one much more. The stories in The Beggar Maid, as other posters have pointed out, do all come together and tend to make the book flow more like a cohesive novel than Dubliners. Dubliners, as the title suggests, is more about the setting than the characters. It attempts (and in my opinion, succeeds) to convey the everyday life of specific people in a specific place during a specific time period. I find the amount of detail interesting and the dialogue very realistic. It really puts the reader in Dublin. Whereas The Beggar Maid seemed more to try and tell the story of Rose’s life, than of life in West Hanratty.
It doesn’t bother me at all that the characters change either. It makes the stories seem fresh. It’s nice to read a book where I don’t have to become attached to main characters that I either can’t identify with or don’t like. If you don’t like who you’re reading about, then just wait a few pages and you’ll get someone new. Overall, Dubliners beats The Beggar Maid for me, and possibly The Road and Waiting for the Barbarians too.

I didn't have a problem "getting into" the first three books at all. I thought they were engaging, thought-provoking, and even inspiring at times. Dubliners, however, is a different story. While I appreciate how Joyce attempted to give his readers a taste of life in Dublin, I think the novel is so preoccupied with the minutiae of that time, place, and culture that I have difficulty in relating to the characters. Also, I realize that this is a trivial annoyance, but I don't enjoy having to constantly flip back and forth between the story and the appendix just so I can decipher what the author is trying to describe to me. So far, there have been several points in 'Dubliners' where I have stopped and wondered to myself: "Is this supposed to be a novel or a geography lesson?" Maybe if I had lived in Dublin during Joyce's time, I would have found this story more engaging - I don't know.

I also think that it hurts the novel not to have a central character. One of the reasons I ended up liking 'The Beggar Maid' as much as I did was because we were able to follow Rose, whom I found to be a very compelling character, from her childhood all the way to her later years. In Dubliners, however, I'm having hard time remembering the characters' names, let alone relating to them.

I didn't have a problem "getting into" the first three books at all. I thought they were engaging, thought-provoking, and even inspiring at times. Dubliners, however, is a different story. While I appreciate how Joyce attempted to give his readers a taste of life in Dublin, I think the novel is so preoccupied with the minutiae of that time, place, and culture that I have difficulty in relating to the characters. Also, I realize that this is a trivial annoyance, but I don't enjoy having to constantly flip back and forth between the story and the appendix just so I can decipher what the author is trying to describe to me. So far, there have been several points in 'Dubliners' where I have stopped and wondered to myself: "Is this supposed to be a novel or a geography lesson?" Maybe if I had lived in Dublin during Joyce's time, I would have found this story more engaging - I don't know.

I also think that it hurts the novel not to have a central character. One of the reasons I ended up liking 'The Beggar Maid' as much as I did was because we were able to follow Rose, whom I found to be a very compelling character, from her childhood all the way to her later years. In Dubliners, however, I'm having hard time remembering the characters' names, let alone relating to them.

Maybe I’m weird but I like Dubliners better overall than Beggar Maid. In stories I like for weird and obscure things to happen. I am not so much interested in how people think (the curiosity for example gets really annoying really fast for me) but more for things to happen in the story. In movies I don’t have enough patience to watch “thinking” movies so reading a book like this takes that much longer and therefore I’m not as intrigued by it. Dubliners at least has some things happening that I would never expect to be written at this time. I’m not saying I like Dubliners over other books but only that Dubliners is a slightly easier read for me. Ignoring the too detailed descriptions of a few things, I appreciate that I can imagine the setting in my head. That is the first thing I try to get out of a scene or story so that I can get the tone and mood. From this, I am able to understand it better. I’ll have to agree with Alyssa Bernardo about the flipping back and forth portion. Sometimes I just get sick of it and choose to be ignorant about that part.

While I could not fully engage myself in Dubliners, I did enjoy some of the stories. Like in The Sisters when the narrator has a hard time accepting Father Flynn's death. I totally understand his feelings on not beginning able to believe that one of his closest friends has died. I understand the surreal state that he was in and this help me to see the narrator as a person. I enjoyed the boarding house story a lot as well. I love how sex is implied but never directly stated. I also had to wonder if it was the mother's plan from the very beginning to have her daughter married to Mr. Doran. She saw the relationship progressing, but never tried to stop the lovers. She also didn't appear shocked when her daughter told her the details of the relationship. And on page 60 it says that "The decisive expression of her florid face satisfied her and she thought of some mothers she knew who could not get their daughters off their hands. It seems to me that she saw how the relationship would develop and was pleased that she could force her daughter unto someone else. And finally I liked A Painful Case and how Mrs. Sinico died not from injuries sustained from the impact the train, but from a problem with her heart. I seems to hints that she died from a broken heart and I just think that was very interesting.

The question I choose during last weeks lecture regarding The Beggar Maid was “What was your favorite story and why?”. My favorite story in the book was Wild Swans because this was the first time we saw Rose as a mature individual. I thought this story had a lot of life lessons that were in between the lines of the story. Rose taught us multiple life stories through her interesting encounters. The question my group came up with in response to the book was “What was your least favorite book and why?”. The story that resinated with me the least was actually the very first story of the book. I found it to be a chain of disturbing events that had no commonality or reason to put them in the same short story. It was very hard for me to continue to read the stories in the book following “Royal Beatings”. I think this was a poor choice as an opening story for the compilation of short stories. I think this book was over all an okay book, it was not difficult to read after you got past the first story and gave you several life lessons to learn from Rose and her mistakes.

Reposting, hopefully it goes through this time :)

As a whole, I really enjoy the way that Joyce uses the short story structure to his advantage. While in “the Beggar Maid,” the huge gaps in the story line became frustrating, with Joyce, it simply makes his themes seem much more universal than they would in an actual novel. By having such a huge cast of characters, Joyce’s theme of paralysis takes on more dimensions that one story ever could. Instead of writing about one person’s tragic story of being stuck in a bad situation, Joyce shows how all people are unlikely to alter their situations, as bad as they may be, for fear of change.

So far in the novel, we have seen people from all walks of life struggling with this lack of impetus in their lives. In ‘Eveline,’ the woman, though condemned to a horrible, abusive life if she chooses to stay in Dublin, cannot bring herself to leave with Frank, because although it is a horrible life, it is all that she knows. In another example, we see how, though people may talk often about all of the things they wish they could change, they’d rather leave the work for someone else, like the men in “Ivy Day” who, though filled to the brim with political ideals, do not seem to want to leave the comfort of their meeting place. Though each story has a different conflict, they always highlight all of the different ways in which a person may find themselves stuck in a life they would never have wished for.

The book has a sort of observational tone to it. Most of the stories center directly on one character who is sort of detached from the rest of the characters. Joyce doesn’t tend to use a lot of strong language and the stories themselves were uneventful. Common themes were, depression, lonlieness, love, and death. Almost all of the characters are facing some sort crisis. A few of them even turn to alcohol, which is another trend among the series of stories. I think my favorite story was Grace because it was long enough wherein it provide you with a little more info the character. although I think the storie’s intro was probably the most exciting thing I read in the entire book, which actually says a lot about the rest of it. I didn’t enjoy the first half as much; the stories were terribly bland and I didn’t have much sympathy for certain characters; Woman in Eveline who, at the last minute, passes up the opportunity to leave her mundane life in Ireland. I did think it was an interesting to learn about what life was like for communities during the rise of Irish nationalism. All in all, Dubliners didn’t really do much for me other than make me feel glad that I didn’t have to live in early 20th century Ireland.

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