Will it draw hot chicks?

| 2 Comments

"Will it draw hot chicks?" is the opening line from the Strib article (via Greater Greater Washington) For new rapid bus lines, much is riding on image

The article contains a good discussion of branding BRT vs. LRT, and the "attractive young female" factor. The key of course is investing enough in buses that people (attractive and ugly, female and male, young and old) have some confidence in the system, like for instance, knowing which buses stop (and when, and where they are going, and how much it costs) at a bus stop (still a mystery in the Twin Cities if you don't have a printed schedule with you or internet access).

No one will try transit without some introductory information. Bus stops are ideal places to provide that information, but the transit agency does not prioritize this. The example of London's buses should be reviewed.

2 Comments

I'm really excited that the CTIB [Counties Transit Improvement Board] will likely force BRT to be considered only if it includes dedicated right of way. On 'hi' frequency services in the twin cities there has been the addition of route signs. You can easily see them on campus (on west bank, wash ave) or on lake street.

I think the 2nd/Marquette expansion and redesign will be our 'bus tunnel' (seattle). Quicker transit through the city along with more information about what bus is coming should really change the experience of commuter bus riders in Minneapolis. The current situation is non-uniform and basically the lowest-grade of service possible at bus stops. I have more amenities waiting for the bus in the suburbs than I do downtown. And even where MetroTransit has upgraded (major transfer points downtown, 4th/hennepin, 4th/nic,etc) they've not done a very good job maintaining the new infrastructure. Its generally dirty and smelly, nobody really wants to wait for a bus in it. I know the transit shelters at chicago/lake are not climate controlled, so very few people actually wait inside the structure. I don't remember if the brooklyn center ones are either. Nobody seems to have thought about even putting in some sort of fan vents to keep them reasonable in the summer.

The "Hi Frequency" signs are at best a bad joke. High frequency should mean one bus every 5 or 10 minutes, not one every 15 or 20. At least those signs tell the bus number, though they still neglects routing, scheduling, and operating hours information.

David Levinson

Network Reliability in Practice

Evolving Transportation Networks

Place and Plexus

The Transportation Experience

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Assessing the Benefits and Costs of Intelligent Transportation Systems

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This page contains a single entry by David Levinson published on August 22, 2008 11:35 AM.

US News College rankings was the previous entry in this blog.

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