Traffic Paint Shortage Threatens Roadwork: FTA Commissioner Advocates Paint

The NY Times says: Traffic Paint Shortage Threatens Roadwork

The scarcity stems in large part from the shortage of an obscure chemical compound called methyl methacrylate, one of the key ingredients in roadworthy paint, which must be sturdy, long-lasting and reflective. A major producer of the compound, Dow Construction Chemicals, had production problems this year at a plant in Deer Park, Tex.

I hope this does not set back the plans of FTA ... Peter Rogoff, who recently said


Supporters of public transit must be willing to share some simple truths that folks don't want to hear. One is this -- Paint is cheap, rails systems are extremely expensive.

Yes, transit riders often want to go by rail. But it turns out you can entice even diehard rail riders onto a bus, if you call it a "special" bus and just paint it a different color than the rest of the fleet.

Once you've got special buses, it turns out that busways are cheap. Take that paint can and paint a designated bus lane on the street system. Throw in signal preemption, and you can move a lot of people at very little cost compared to rail.

David Levinson

Network Reliability in Practice

Evolving Transportation Networks

Place and Plexus

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This page contains a single entry by David Levinson published on May 25, 2010 3:28 PM.

462 - Gridding London « Strange Maps was the previous entry in this blog.

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