Gasoline Prices and Their Relationship to Drunk-Driving Crashes

Recent working paper:



This study investigates the relationship between changing gasoline prices and drunk-driving crashes. Specifically, we examine the effects of gasoline prices on drunk-driving crashes in Mississippi by age, gender, and race from 2004-2008, a period experiencing great fluctuation in gasoline prices. An exploratory visualization by graphs shows that higher gasoline prices are generally associated with fewer drunk-driving crashes. Higher gasoline prices depress drunk- driving crashes among younger and older drivers, among male and female drivers, and among white, black, and Hispanic drivers. The statistical results suggest that higher gasoline prices lead to lower drunk-driving crashes for female and black drivers. However, alcohol consumption is a better predictor of drunk-driving crashes, especially for male, white, and older drivers.

David Levinson

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This page contains a single entry by David Levinson published on June 1, 2010 6:05 AM.

How do Roads Spread AIDS in Africa? A Critique of the Received Policy Wisdom was the previous entry in this blog.

Texting While (Not) Driving is the next entry in this blog.

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