China: Bullet trains collide in Zhejiang province

ChinaTrainCrash

BBC News reports: China: Bullet trains collide in Zhejiang province

At least 11 people have died and 89 people injured after two high-speed trains crashed into each other in eastern China, state media reports.

Two train coaches fell off a bridge after derailing close to Wenzhou in Zhejiang province.

Details are sketchy but Chinese media report that one of the trains came to a halt after being struck by lightning and was then hit by the second train.

Rescue workers are at the scene, near Shuangyu town in Wenzhou.

It is not known how many people were on the trains at the time, but Xinhua news agency says each carriage can carry 100 people.

Initial reports suggested one bullet train had derailed at about 2030 (1230 GMT) - the D3115 travelling from the provincial capital Hangzhou to Wenzhou.

But local television later said the first train had been forced to stop after losing power due to a lightning strike, and was then rear-ended by another train, causing two of its carriages to fall off the bridge.


"D" trains are the first generation of bullet trains in China, with an average speed of just short of 100mph (160km/h).

I suspect at least one official will get executed over this. High Speed Trains should not collide. Japan has had approximately 0 deaths due to these kinds of failures (excluding suicide) in 50 years of Shinkansen operation.

David Levinson

Network Reliability in Practice

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This page contains a single entry by David Levinson published on July 23, 2011 12:11 PM.

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