Hateful online comments need not apply

by JARRED PETERSON

In the generation of social networking and reading the newspaper online, anonymous online comments lurk their way through these mediums with hateful and racial messages toward others.

by LIZZY BLACKMON

DULUTH, Minn. - Park Point will be getting a new hotel despite neighbors' hesitation.

by KLAUS SNYDER

The windows of Johnson's Bros. Furniture in West End are covered with signs announcing impending retirement of the owners, not to mention sales on everything in the store.

by TONY SCHMITT

DULUTH, Minn.- With UMD men's hockey ranked number one in the nation,the Bulldog players are anxious to carry its success into the new AMSOIL Arena during its opening on Dec. 30 against its rival the University of North Dakota.


by JULIE KRIENKE

DULUTH, Minn.- Spirit Mountain's Timber Twister, a 3,200-foot-long alpine coaster that opened July 1, will stay open during the winter months in the hopes of bringing in more customers for the local recreation area.

by KAYLIE REYNOLDS

DULUTH, Minn. - Duluth citizens gave their input on Nov. 18 regarding the new stop lights and signs that will be added to streets surrounding the East Hillside neighborhoods. The citizens of Duluth believe that stoplights are a necessity in order to maintain a safe community. Accidents can be prevented by installing both lights and signs.

by ANN SCHMITZ

DULUTH, Minn.-Texas Roadhouse by Miller Hill Mall continues to bring guests in by the crowds due to its fresh food and enthusiastic customer service.

by EMILY SCHNACKY

University of Minnesota Duluth student organization S.E.R.V.E. (Students Engaged in Rewarding Volunteer Experiences) members shared their time and compassion at Fruit of the Vine food shelf at the Vineyard Christian Church Tuesday Nov. 16.

by ANNE KUNKEL

DULUTH, Minn. - Rumors of the old Armory on London Road becoming the site of a Dinkytown has University of Minnesota Duluth students excited, and curious about what exactly the city is planning to do.

by TOM BENSON

DULUTH, Minn. - Normally when someone is "spinning you a yarn" it means that you're in for something that might be over exaggerated, hard to believe, far fetched if you will.

Game Planet leaves Kenwood shopping plaza

by HALEY KNOPIK

Located in the Kenwood shopping plaza between "LIQUOR" liquor store, and "Master Framing Creations," "Game Planet" was close to many establishments that people visited on a weekly basis and while the store has been closed for over a month, so far no potential owners have put word into leasing the location.


by AMY BERG

DULUTH, Minn.- The name Ulta does not really give people a hint to what is inside the new store that opened in the Miller Hill Mall on Oct. 25. But once inside, it is quite clear.

by OLIVIA KING

DULUTH, Minn. - A side project to install bike lanes across the City of Duluth, taking into consideration the safety of local bikers, is being introduced by Duluth City Council member Dan Hartman, and will possibly be in motion by 2011.

by MADIHA MIRZA

The international students at UMD came together to share their native food with fellow students and UMD community Nov.13 on the Taste of UMD at the Hope United Methodist Church.

by ANNELYSE HARRISON

SILVER BAY, Minn. -After six months of hard work, the much-anticipated Silver Bay Carefree Living Center in Silver Bay is ready to open for up to 34 residents to move in by Dec. 15.

Capping not long-term solution for potholes

by REEGAN LLOYD

BOOM! You hear it each time you drive down a road in Duluth as your tire falls into a pothole. The road conditions in Duluth are a source of concern and frustration, and still a solution is unclear.


by LUKE WIENEKE

DULUTH, Minn.-Despite the long hours of noisy construction during most of the summer and fall, the new McDonalds on 21st Avenue East and London Road and the residential neighbors around it as well as employees, are happy that it is back in business.

By JARRED PETERSON

The season is here again and Bentleyville is back at Bayfront Festival Park Nov. 20 through Dec. 26 with new attractions and a mission to help the less fortunate.

by TOM BENSON

Professor John Hatcher, from the University of Minnesota Duluth, had an opinion piece published last year condemning the anonymity of comments made on the Internet. And I agree with him. While the introduction of the social network, chat rooms, blogs, and even You Tube has given us access to more insight into human culture than any point in our history, it has also given rise to new levels of perversity.

by DANIELLE ARCAND

I am not going to tell you who I am until the end because I want to prove a point: Knowing who I am doesn't matter. Anonymous internet comments allow everyday people to freely say how they feel without the worry of being judged.

Anonymous comments lower ethical standards

by OLIVIA KING

If you have an opinion that you would like to share with people, why be afraid to put your name on it to let people know it's yours.


by HALEY KNOPIK

After reading the article "Stop anonymous postings" by John Hatcher, there are components of his perspective that I certainly agree with. The detailed article included arguments aimed at how people perceive a newspaper story. Hatcher's article concluded to be about how readers can decide if they want to read your article prior to actually reading it, based solely on the author.

By JULIE KRIENKE

Many of us would like to think that our credibility as a writer matters to those reading our work, would we not? However, in today's day and age, the seemingly endless amount of anonymous postings on news articles throughout the nation have shown that the knowledge and reliability writers have is becoming less and less important.

by KAYLIE REYNOLDS

I agree with John Hatcher, and I believe that people should not be able to remain anonymous with their comments and opinions. If you're going to be bold enough to say it, be bold enough to take credit for it.

Think before you type

by JILLIAN SORCAN

On the issue of cowardly anonymity within online news articles, I couldn't agree more with John Hatcher. Gutsy comments can be found everywhere these days, not only on news articles, but websites like YouTube as well. If crediting one's name were required, would we see even a fraction of these shameful comments anymore?

by EMILY SCHNACKY

Let's increase our standards and trade bad-mannered comments for insightful and tasteful ones. News organizations should stray away from allowing anonymous web comments on their web pages by making people identify themselves and take credibility for their postings. John Hatcher's opinion piece on raising our standards on anonymous postings is clever and spot on.
Comments that attack such as defamation, hate speech, and obscenity should simply be deleted. Even if they did have a name next to them they are still not ethically right and show plain bad taste to the news organization. With rules that make people identify themselves before posting a comment there will be less issues with bad-mannered comments.

by KLAUS SNYDER

You know who I am, and, according to Professor John Hatcher of the University of Minnesota Duluth, that means you should be better able to trust what I tell you on an internet forum. I have news for you; you shouldn't.

by AMY BERG

In today's age of the online newspaper and anonymous postings, it is easy to say anything, regardless if it is appropriate, and not have to put a name to it. University of Minnesota Duluth Professor John Hatcher thinks that this should not be allowed and that it just feeds the fire for ignorance.

Being anonymous gives you freedom of speech

by STEPHANIE JOHNSON

Anonymous comments are the reasons why America is considered free. Take away one small thing like this that restricts freedom and it goes into chaos. Besides, if this were to change anyway, people would find a way around it like usual.

by ANNELYSE HARRISON

Humans are complicated.

We fight to establish our identities, yet insist on remaining anonymous.

Though I do not think the option to remain anonymous should vanish all together, I do think some revisions must be made.

by ANNE KUNKEL

"If you want to say it, put your name next to it," John Hatcher, a journalism professor at UMD would say. And frankly, I would have to agree.

by LUKE WIENEKE

Professor John Hatcher has it all correct. His article about anonymous postings on news web sites was a perfect synopsis as to what is really happening amongst the comments sections that follow stories on these news web sites.

by LIZZY BLACKMON

John Hatcher had one thing right: the old anonymous posting service was not ethical. But it sure was a lot of fun!


We must take responsibility for our words

by TONY SCHMITT

It makes me proud to live in such a free and diverse country. There is such a large pool of opinions, which allows for a culturally rich environment, and it is important that we have the dignity to stand by our opinions.

Anonymity lacks credibility

by MADIHA MIRZA

It has become a norm that whenever a news story hits the web, the comments section of online news articles, opinion columns and blogs are filled with anonymous angry rants and personal attacks.

Important to eliminate anonymous comments

by HOLLY NELSON

Hello. My name is Holly Nelson. I am a student at the University of Minnesota Duluth. I believe I have intelligent and relevant things to share with the public and therefore accept the responsibility of sharing my identity with the readers who deserve to know my identity. Whew! Now that wasn't so hard was it?

by ANN SCHMITZ

Should anonymous writes take responsibility for their posts? Professor John Hatcher thinks so.

Longwell kick seals victory for Vikings

by HALEY KNOPIK

MINNEAPOLIS- The Minnesota Vikings who are 1-3 played the Dallas Cowboys (1-3) at 3p.m. downtown Minneapolis on Oct. 17 with a final score of 24-21, thanks to Vikings' kicker Ryan Longwell, who kicked a 38-yard field goal with 4:05 left in the fourth quarter.

by HOLLY NELSON

During Kristen Chick's 7 p.m. presentation on democracy promotion in the Middle East on Wednesday, Nov. 17, Chick discussed many topics that opened my eyes a little to the life of a foreign correspondant, but mostly the many complicated complexities that must be considered when dealing with international relations in non-democratic countries such as in the middle east.

by DANIELLE ARCAND

Kristen Chick, a freelance journalist who resides in Egypt, spoke at UMD last Wednesday. She discussed what the job market is like for journalists, what she her job is, and advice for inspiring journalists.

by LIZZY BLACKMON

I attended the evening presentation Kristen Chick gave about her experience promoting democracy in the Middle East.

by ANNELYSE HARRISON

Kristin Chick, a foreign correspondent and reporter for the Christian Science Monitor, gave an enlightening presentation Nov. 17 to a class of aspiring journalists on the opportunities available to young journalists.

by REEGAN LLOYD

What was supposed to be a close game between the University of Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs and the Winona State University Warriors, turned out to be more of a Bulldog football clinic than an actual game.

Bulldogs win during first season game

by BROOKE DIRKS

The first home game of the season was a sell out with thousands of students and local Duluth residents yelling out cheers as the Bulldogs won 5-3.

by JOSH WOLF

I believe that Josh Wolf is a journalist. You do not need any formal training to report an important event in the world. Wolf is considered a video blogger, which requires him to record videos and post them on his weblog. He took his camera out into the field and was able to record an important occurrence, which many people quickly became interested in. Wolf posted his video on the web, and it became news instantly. Some critics may say that Wolf is strictly a blogger, and there is no journalism or news reporting involved. I would disagree with these said critics. Journalism is about getting out there and finding a story and then presenting it to the world. Wolf did exactly that, he took the initiative to go out in the middle of a dangerous protest to get a story. He got his story, and posted it for the world to see, he did exactly what journalists do, but instead of writing about it, he let his video tell the story.

by AMY BERG

When I heard what the title of the speaker's presentation was, Democracy Promotion in the Middle East, I had an idea in my head as to what she would be talking about. Then she started talking about Egypt, which is not the country I guessed she would. This presentation really gave me some good background and basic information on the relationships Egypt has. She had a lot more to say than basic information, but some of the issues she was talking about did not grab my attention

by HALEY KNOPIK

Foreign correspondent Kristin Chick, talked to a number of UMD students Wednesday concerning her decisions to work abroad for U.S. newspapers and life in Lebanon. Chick graduated from the University of Alabama with a bachelor degree in Journalism. On a whim, she purchased a ticket to Lebanon with a "promise" to work for a paper in Egypt. As for education background, Chick advises students interested in the journalism field, to major in a subject that interests them (i.e; political science, biology, criminology, etc) with a minor in journalism. "The background information you learn in college on specific majors will help your knowledge on the type of things you want to write about," Chick said.

by DANIELLE ARCAND

VERONA, Wis. - On Oct. 31 the highly competitive Big Ten Cross Country Championship, hosted by the University of Wisconsin at the Zimmer Champions Course in Verona, welcomed an unusually inexperienced group of Women's Cross Country runners that surprisingly broke records.

Bulldogs top Golden Eagles in straight sets

by JILLIAN SORCAN

The Bulldogs volleyball team didn't mess around on Nov. 5, quickly taking the lead over Crookston's Golden Eagles and coming out with a 3-0 victory.

by BROOKE DIRKS

In my opinion I do not think Josh Wolf is a journalist. He had a blog and that is all. It states opinions more than news and he was not affiliated with any syndicated news outlet. He is a journalist in the sense that he wants to show the public events of certain things, but the view is slanted to get the right affect out of the crowd.

Legitimate source makes blogs credible

by KAYLIE REYNOLDS

Josh Wolf is a journalist who was a video activist for several different protests and events. He refused to give up some footage he shot of a protest on July 8, 2005in San Francisco that caused a police officer to be injured. The judge sent him a subpoena to give up the footage and Wolf refused to comply. He remained in jail for 226 days. That's the longest a journalist has been held in jail for refusing to give up sources.

by ANNE KUNKEL

PROCTOR, Minn. - Hermantown Hawks took back the hammer from rival team Proctor Rails with a 30-12 win on Oct. 18 in the final seventh grade football game of the season.



by STEPHANIE JOHNSON

NORTHFIELD, Minn.-The Faribault Falcons and Northfield Raiders football ended their season on Oct. 14, with the Falcons coming out on top with the final score at 14-8. "The difference between the first half and the second is that we wanted the ball more than they did," Coach Brian Cherwinka said.

by EMILY SCHNACKY

He went to great heights to protect his First Amendment freedoms and now 28-year-old blogger Josh Wolf is known as the longest-serving journalist behind bars for spending nearly 8 months in federal prison.


by ANNELYSE HARRISON

Once again the government has managed to stick its big nose where it doesn't belong.
Josh Wolf, 24-year-old blogger, was added to the growing list of journalists imprisoned for protecting their sources. Wolf was jailed on Aug. 1, 2006 after refusing to testify in front of a grand jury and turn over a series of videotapes he recorded during an anti-G8 anarchist protest in San Francisco on July 8, 2005.

Lady Bulldogs top Northern State in soccer

by KAYLIE REYNOLDS

DULUTH, Minn. - The lady Bulldogs soccer beat Northern State on Oct. 10 with a final score of 1-0, making their record 7-3-2.

Cherry Tigers sink Silver Bay Mariners

by ANNELYSE HARRISON

SILVER BAY, Minn. - The Cherry Tigers sank the Silver Bay Mariners 41-29 in the Nine-Man Section 7 high school football game Friday Oct. 8 at Silver Bay.


by TONY SCHMITT

DULUTH, Minn.- The UMD Bulldogs defense flexed its muscles as the team advanced its 5-0 record in a momentous 59-17 victory over long time rivals, the Winona State Warriors, on Oct. 29 at Griggs Stadium.

Bulldogs shut out the Marauders

by EMILY SCHNACKY

The No. 2 ranked University of Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs women's soccer team defeated No. 7 ranked Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference rival University of Mary Marauders 1-0 Nov. 3 in the first round of playoffs at James S. Malosky stadium.


by LIZZY BLACKMON

DULUTH, Minn. - St. Scholastica women's volleyball defeated Northland College 3-0 for the second time this season at a home match on Oct. 8.

by AMY BERG

DULUTH, Minn.- The Cloquet Lumberjacks, defending section champions, chopped down the Marshall Hilltoppers in prep girls soccer with a final score of 8-2 on Oct. 12.

by TOM BENSON

When Josh Wolf was imprisoned for failing to comply with a Federal subpoena demanding the release of video of riots at the G8 Summit in San Francisco, issues on both sides of the argument were quickly realized, if not acted upon. Some people in the journalistic community questioned the validity of the subpoena, while others wondered if Wolf fit the technical definition of a journalist as he claimed or if he was simply another blogger, and therefore not under California's shield law protection as other journalists would be.


Princeton falls to the Knights at home

by JARRED PETERSON

PRINCETON, Minn. - In another disappointing loss at the last game at home on Oct. 15, the winless Princeton Tigers fell 6-27 to the St. Michael-Albertville Knights (4-2-0) after a putting the first points on the board all season.

by JARRED PETERSON

Josh Wolf, which describes himself a journalist, wants to get the truth out there. Wolf was prison for his video footage of an anti-G8 summit protest in San Francisco in July 2005. The Federal government wanted the footage because it could have shown a police car being set on fire and other crimes during the protest. In addition, the protest caused an officer to be assaulted with a pipe. Wolf went to jail for almost eight months for refusing to give the government his video footage and testifying in front of a grand jury. The Federal believed they had every right to the footage considering Wolf even let local news stations use his footage.
Wolf was questioned whether he was an actual journalist. The government questioned Wolf as a journalist because he does not actually fit the definition. I believe the point of a journalist is to get the truth out, without being bias. He does not work for a formal news organization, but he does have a blog, where he puts videos and articles up. Wolf believes that a blog is a viable media in journalism if it gives actually news that is creditable and unbiased. In my opinion, I believe anyone that tries to get the truth out, no matter what the consequence, is a journalist.

Government had a right to Josh Wolf footage

by DANIELLE ARCAND

While I understand that Wolf didn't hand over his footage of the demonstration in San Francisco because he wanted to stand up for his rights as a journalist, I believe that since there could have been evidence of crime he should have given the government his footage. If there wasn't a concern of crime on the video, Wolf would have been in the right.


by AMY BERG

After reading through the materials and information on Josh Wolf, I would have to say that he should not be considered a journalist. To call him a journalist would be saying that anyone who posts pictures, video, or information on the internet is a journalist. This then could mean that anyone who has a Facebook page or Twitter account could be considered a journalist, which is not true. On the Wikipedia page, it said that Wolf is currently attending journalism school at UC Berkeley. This shows that he wants to get accredited as a legitimate journalist and wants the title too.

Josh Wolf technically not a journalist

by TONY SCHMITT

DULUTH, Minn.- On August 1, 2006 a controversial arrest of a journalist was made for withholding evidence in the form of a videotape, yet the controversy lies not in the tape but was this man a journalist?

by LIZZY BLACKMON

Josh Wolf is a journalist because he reports news, plain and simple. You don't need a journalism degree to be a journalist just as you don't need a writing degree to be a writer. Wolf recognizes himself as a transparent journalist in that his biases are on the table, unlike mainstream media. It is impossible to remain truly unbiased, a criticism of Walter Cronkite by Pat Buchanan.


by JILLIAN SORCAN

After capturing chilling video of a police officer choking a protester in 2005, Josh Wolf was sent to jail for not giving up the footage, and even after that, his dedication to journalism doesn't cease.


by MADIHA MIRZA

Kristen Chick, the foreign correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor, gave a short talk to journalism and writing studies students at the University of Minnesota Duluth on Wednesday, Nov. 17. Chick is a freelance journalist and the foreign correspondent in Cairo for the Christian Science Monitor.

by MADIHA MIRZA

DULUTH, Minn. - The University of Minnesota Duluth soccer team gained the top position in the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference after its 1-0 victory against Bemidji State University Oct. 22 at James S. Malosky Stadium.


by MADIHA MIRZA

Josh Wolf is a 24-year-old independent journalist and video blogger who spent more than 7 months behind bars in California, which is the longest time any U.S. journalist has served in the prison for protecting source materials.

by OLIVIA KING

DULUTH, Minn.-Although they may not have had the thousands of screaming fans like the football team, the UMD Bulldog volleyball team bump, set, and spiked its way to yet another victory in its Oct. 13 homecoming match against Winona State University.

by OLIVIA KING

I thought that Josh Wolf's story was a very interesting one in that he went to jail for a video tape that he would not give up to authorities although, according to him it had no incriminating evidence on it.

by HOLLY NELSON

The UMD volleyball team celebrated yet another victory Nov. 5 in Romano Gymnasium during a match against the University of Minnesota Crookston.

Josh Wolf upholds journalistic integrity

by HOLLY NELSON

After reading about Josh Wolf, a journalist who was given the longest jail sentence yet in the U.S. for not releasing his sources, I respect Josh very much for his decision to uphold his journalistic integrity.


Does blogger equal journalist?

By KLAUS SNYDER

SAN FRANCISCO - After 226 days in federal prison, video blogger Josh Wolf, confined for refusing to turn over evidence, was released on April 3, 2007.

by HALEY KNOPIK

Former journalist and video reporter, Joshua Wolf, was a former journalist after being incarcerated for editing clips of a 2005 San Francisco protest event. Wolf served 226 days in Dublin, California for editing clips of the event and posting them on the internet for viewers everywhere.


By STEPHANIE JOHNSON

An American journalist named Josh Wolf was put into prison for 226 days. Aug. 1, 2006 was his first day in prison and then he was released Sept. 1 due to bail, but the bail was revoked and he was back on Sept. 22. After spending the time in jail, he was finally released on April 3, 2007.

Wolf doesn't think it pays to obey

by ANN SCHMITZ

Is Josh Wolf a real journalist?

First impression of a journalist who spent 8 months in prison which is longer than any other journalist in U.S. history has served for protecting source materials. Josh Wolf, former freelance journalist, blogger and photographer just happen to be in the right place at the right time when he recorded footage that may show a San Francisco squad car being set on fire. This immediately sparked the feds attention and sent Josh Wolf into a burning ring of fire.
Wolf denied that he recorded arson on his videotape and hoped to receive protection under California's shield law, which protects those who have unpublished materials. When being interview by Time Wolf said, "If you try to assert your human rights, your basic constitutional rights, which we should have under law, you will be punished unmercifully."

Bulldog adjustments dominate Friars

by LUKE WIENEKE

DULUTH, Minn - The University of Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs came out firing on all cylinders Oct. 16 at the DECC, as the men's hockey team completed the series sweep by beating the Providence Friars 7-1.

by LUKE WIENEKE

Josh Wolf, despite the political and criminal opinions in his interview, is in my opinion a journalist. I believe this because he publishes work on the internet, and it is read by a wide margin of people worldwide despite having editors and other journalists proofreading his work, that he is a journalist.


By JULIE KRIENKE

DULUTH, Minn.- The University of Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs have broadened its winning streak to seven games after racking up a 49-0 victory against the University of Mary Marauders in the Homecoming football game at Malosky Stadium Oct. 16.


By JULIE KRIENKE

The imprisonment of American journalist Joshua Wolf by a Federal district court due to resistance in turning over a collection of videotapes demonstrates how unjust and self-absorbed the federal government has become in recent years, especially when dealing with journalistic issues in the United States.


By JULIE KRIENKE

The lecture given Nov. 17 by foreign correspondent Kristen Chick, reporter for the Christian Science Monitor, was an enlightening and informative one. At this time, Chick works for the Christian Science Monitor, an international news organization, by covering current events in the areas of Egypt and the Middle East. Chick has a bachelor's degree from the University of Alabama, and she fluently speaks the Arabic language. To start her lecture, Chick explained how there are many opportunities for journalists when they work abroad. However, many young journalists do not think about working internationally because they have little interest in global politics. Furthermore, Chick explained that the job market in the United States is currently not doing well, and that many journalists should consider becoming a foreign correspondent. Because of the bad job market in the United States journalism industry, many media companies are looking for more correspondents to cover news in other countries. However, many journalists in the United States do not think about this option because it involves so many risks.

By JILLIAN SORCAN

At first sight, Kristen Chick looks nothing like many might picture a foreign correspondent to be. The soft spoken, petite young woman from Alabama looked more like a college student than someone who just stepped off a plane from Cairo the day before her presentation at UMD. Shyly laughing and admitting that she still gets nervous before interviews, Chick talked all about her career in journalism in a helpful, realistic way that aspiring journalists could take a lot away from.

Wolf unconventional journalist

By ANNE KUNKEL

I feel that yes, Josh Wolf is a journalist, but not the most conventional one. He is a blogger, which in my opinion, puts him at the bottom of the journalism food chain, however to me he is still a journalist. I understand how most people, like newspaper journalists, don't share my view. Even though he is out there capturing news like reporters, he doesn't have an editor or anyone to report back to or to organize thoughts with. Since he is a blogger he just "free-lances" it, and since that isn't traditional reporting, a lot of people frown at it.

By EMILY SCHNACKY

Journalist Kristen Chick, Cairo Christian Science Monitor correspondent, spoke about democracy promotion in the Middle East Wednesday evening in the UMD library rotunda. She graduated from the University of Alabama with a bachelor's degree in journalism. She covered the war between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon in 2006 and has also worked as a reporter for The Washington Times in Washington, D.C. She was a Fulbright scholar to Egypt and speaks Arabic. Chick has just returned to the United States from a trip to Egypt. During her presentation Wednesday she explored the effects of both administrations' approaches to democracy promotion in the Middle East.

by JULIE KRIENKE

Citizens around the United States recognize November 2 as Election Day year after year, and on this day, many eager residents pile into the closest precincts to cast their vote. For Duluth citizens, many precincts were available throughout the city to cast votes for Minnesota governor and local positions within Duluth. Not only is Election Day a huge event in the political arena, but it is an exceptionally significant happening in the media world. For local broadcasting stations like Northland's Newscenter, the election means a long and hectic day not only the reporters at the station but also everyone else coordinating the newscast. Home to several news channels, Northland's Newscenter is relied on by many people throughout Duluth for up-to-date and instantaneous coverage of the election. As a volunteer at the station on Election Day, I was a part of the frenzy and hysteria that takes at not only broadcasting stations but also other media outlets when it comes to covering the election. What's more, I learned a great deal about both what happens on Election Day and how reporters at broadcasting stations cover these events.

By LIZZY BLACKMON

On Tuesday November 2 I was a volunteer vote reporter for Northland's NewsCenter's election coverage.


by PRINCESS AWA-ADA KISOB

Minnesota's gubernational race is at its peak and many college students at the University of Minnesota Duluth and the College of St. Scholastica don't know who to vote for or why.

by HOLLY NELSON

At Monday's City Council meeting, a resolution concerning approval of a contract with Morton Salt passed after an environmentally conscious citizen presented the council with the harmful effects of using the salt on the roads.

by REEGAN LLOYD

When an elderly man entered the City Council meeting on Monday evening, there was one thing on his mind- filing a lawsuit against the City of Duluth.


by TOM BENSON

DULUTH, Minn. - An amendment that would prevent city environmental workers from treating diseased trees is brewing controversy in Duluth.

by OLIVIA KING

DULUTH, Minn.-The City Council took into consideration, and will look for further solutions to a concerned Duluth woman's opinion about the abundant use of road salt and its effects on the local trout population at their meeting last night.


By ANNE KUNKEL

Freshwater trout sparked a road salting debate for the City Council members and public during Monday's meeting, with the decision to keep plans the same for now and to keep looking for a future solution.

by LIZZY BLACKMON

DULUTH, Minn. - A resident asked the City Council on Monday to reconsider approving a motion to authorize road salt budget because of its effects on the environment but it was approved despite questions.


by JILLIAN SORCAN

Keeping Duluth's environment clean became a hot topic at Monday's City Council meeting when the issue of road salt run-off into local waterways was brought forth by a concerned citizen.

Duluth City Council rejects mini-trucks

by MADIHA MIRZA

DULUTH, Minn. - An ordinance legalizing mini-trucks in Duluth failed by a vote of 5 to 4 in Monday evening's Duluth City Council meeting.


by STEPHANIE JOHNSON

DULUTH, Minn.-A City Council meeting was held on Oct. 25 in Duluth City Hall at 7 p.m. discussing an issue involving the salt usage on Duluth streets. With President Jeff Anderson as the head of the City Council, the salt issue was discussed well, picked apart, and then decided on.

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