Anonymous posting should be minimized, if not banned

by HALEY KNOPIK

After reading the article "Stop anonymous postings" by John Hatcher, there are components of his perspective that I certainly agree with. The detailed article included arguments aimed at how people perceive a newspaper story. Hatcher's article concluded to be about how readers can decide if they want to read your article prior to actually reading it, based solely on the author.

The main problem that Hatcher presents to readers in his article is how the media allows people to stay anonymous, opening their opinions to rude and obscene judgments. I agree with Hatcher when he states that "we have unintentionally let changes in technology lower our ethical standards." The internet especially allows people from anywhere at any time to write what comes to mind, whether it be offensive to some or not.

The issue(s) with anonymous posting isn't necessarily what is being said, but by whom. Hatcher mentioned the FBI had to investigate an anonymous death threat that was posted in Tennessee in October 2009. Its reasons such as that, that I support minimizing anonymous articles on the internet or anywhere for that matter.

It has been a recent trend to post opinions anonymously via internet and newspapers. I agree with Hatcher as he states, "I don't think news organizations can justify allowing anonymity simply because others are doing it. Peer pressure is usually a pretty weak excuse for an ethical lapse."

As researched by Hatcher and bloggers worldwide, the purpose of sharing opinions anonymously has been lost. Anonymous posters write rude and defensive comments with the sense that no repercussions will ensue. These people write these mean-hearted opinions [in hope] that they will be understood and agreed with, without their names being attached to anything a reader might find "offensive."

Although internet and news organizations are exempt from having to post names with opinion articles, I acknowledge Hatcher's viewpoint in that if you are going to post something, stand by your word(s). Nationwide, websites are slowly being forced to unveil the identities of anonymous posters. I believe this will benefit online users, and make people think twice before posting their opinions.

The posting of crude opinions or even overly-opinionated statements online or via newspaper has got to come to an end. In today's society, an individual should know what to stand for without feeling they have to represent it anonymously.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Jour 2101 published on November 28, 2010 3:17 PM.

Writers should take credit for the work they produce was the previous entry in this blog.

Anonymous comments lower ethical standards is the next entry in this blog.

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