Council OKs contract for salt use despite concerns

by STEPHANIE JOHNSON

DULUTH, Minn.-A City Council meeting was held on Oct. 25 in Duluth City Hall at 7 p.m. discussing an issue involving the salt usage on Duluth streets. With President Jeff Anderson as the head of the City Council, the salt issue was discussed well, picked apart, and then decided on.

Linda Sellner, who is a concerned citizen and researcher, said the salt used on roads to melt snow and ice is overly used and is destroying the environment. "The salt we use on the roads is destroying ecosystems from the run off of melted water," Sellner said. She wants Duluth to use less salt or find a replacement that isn't as harmful to the land and animals.

Not only is the salt being used twice as much as last year, but the more salt we use, the more we have to spend money on it. "It keeps increasing damage as well as purchase," Sellner said.

The salt use also runs into utilities problems. When the salt melts the snow and ice, the run-off goes into the sewer and rusts/rots away the pipes. This causes breakdowns and more money will need to be spent to fix them.

The pipes are already over 80 years old and won't be fixed until 150 years have passed. Money is already being spent on the pipes in case they break down because of the cold and harsh treatment of winter. So costs need to be reduced if at all possible.

Throughout Sellner's speech, the members of the City Council listened intently and eventually agreed to the act. They are now monitoring road maintenance constantly about how much salt is being used and everything else that goes on on the road. They will try to reduce it or are on the verge of doing so throughout the year.


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This page contains a single entry by Jour 2101 published on November 7, 2010 5:01 PM.

Duluth woman unsuccessfully asks council to end road salt use was the previous entry in this blog.

Duluth City Council rejects mini-trucks is the next entry in this blog.

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