Recently in John Hatcher Editorial Analysis Category

Hateful online comments need not apply

by JARRED PETERSON

In the generation of social networking and reading the newspaper online, anonymous online comments lurk their way through these mediums with hateful and racial messages toward others.

by TOM BENSON

Professor John Hatcher, from the University of Minnesota Duluth, had an opinion piece published last year condemning the anonymity of comments made on the Internet. And I agree with him. While the introduction of the social network, chat rooms, blogs, and even You Tube has given us access to more insight into human culture than any point in our history, it has also given rise to new levels of perversity.

by DANIELLE ARCAND

I am not going to tell you who I am until the end because I want to prove a point: Knowing who I am doesn't matter. Anonymous internet comments allow everyday people to freely say how they feel without the worry of being judged.

Anonymous comments lower ethical standards

by OLIVIA KING

If you have an opinion that you would like to share with people, why be afraid to put your name on it to let people know it's yours.


by HALEY KNOPIK

After reading the article "Stop anonymous postings" by John Hatcher, there are components of his perspective that I certainly agree with. The detailed article included arguments aimed at how people perceive a newspaper story. Hatcher's article concluded to be about how readers can decide if they want to read your article prior to actually reading it, based solely on the author.

By JULIE KRIENKE

Many of us would like to think that our credibility as a writer matters to those reading our work, would we not? However, in today's day and age, the seemingly endless amount of anonymous postings on news articles throughout the nation have shown that the knowledge and reliability writers have is becoming less and less important.

by KAYLIE REYNOLDS

I agree with John Hatcher, and I believe that people should not be able to remain anonymous with their comments and opinions. If you're going to be bold enough to say it, be bold enough to take credit for it.

Think before you type

by JILLIAN SORCAN

On the issue of cowardly anonymity within online news articles, I couldn't agree more with John Hatcher. Gutsy comments can be found everywhere these days, not only on news articles, but websites like YouTube as well. If crediting one's name were required, would we see even a fraction of these shameful comments anymore?

by EMILY SCHNACKY

Let's increase our standards and trade bad-mannered comments for insightful and tasteful ones. News organizations should stray away from allowing anonymous web comments on their web pages by making people identify themselves and take credibility for their postings. John Hatcher's opinion piece on raising our standards on anonymous postings is clever and spot on.
Comments that attack such as defamation, hate speech, and obscenity should simply be deleted. Even if they did have a name next to them they are still not ethically right and show plain bad taste to the news organization. With rules that make people identify themselves before posting a comment there will be less issues with bad-mannered comments.

by KLAUS SNYDER

You know who I am, and, according to Professor John Hatcher of the University of Minnesota Duluth, that means you should be better able to trust what I tell you on an internet forum. I have news for you; you shouldn't.

by AMY BERG

In today's age of the online newspaper and anonymous postings, it is easy to say anything, regardless if it is appropriate, and not have to put a name to it. University of Minnesota Duluth Professor John Hatcher thinks that this should not be allowed and that it just feeds the fire for ignorance.

Being anonymous gives you freedom of speech

by STEPHANIE JOHNSON

Anonymous comments are the reasons why America is considered free. Take away one small thing like this that restricts freedom and it goes into chaos. Besides, if this were to change anyway, people would find a way around it like usual.

by ANNELYSE HARRISON

Humans are complicated.

We fight to establish our identities, yet insist on remaining anonymous.

Though I do not think the option to remain anonymous should vanish all together, I do think some revisions must be made.

by ANNE KUNKEL

"If you want to say it, put your name next to it," John Hatcher, a journalism professor at UMD would say. And frankly, I would have to agree.

by LUKE WIENEKE

Professor John Hatcher has it all correct. His article about anonymous postings on news web sites was a perfect synopsis as to what is really happening amongst the comments sections that follow stories on these news web sites.

by LIZZY BLACKMON

John Hatcher had one thing right: the old anonymous posting service was not ethical. But it sure was a lot of fun!


We must take responsibility for our words

by TONY SCHMITT

It makes me proud to live in such a free and diverse country. There is such a large pool of opinions, which allows for a culturally rich environment, and it is important that we have the dignity to stand by our opinions.

Anonymity lacks credibility

by MADIHA MIRZA

It has become a norm that whenever a news story hits the web, the comments section of online news articles, opinion columns and blogs are filled with anonymous angry rants and personal attacks.

Important to eliminate anonymous comments

by HOLLY NELSON

Hello. My name is Holly Nelson. I am a student at the University of Minnesota Duluth. I believe I have intelligent and relevant things to share with the public and therefore accept the responsibility of sharing my identity with the readers who deserve to know my identity. Whew! Now that wasn't so hard was it?

by ANN SCHMITZ

Should anonymous writes take responsibility for their posts? Professor John Hatcher thinks so.

About this Archive

This page is an archive of recent entries in the John Hatcher Editorial Analysis category.

Hard News 2: Story Ideas is the previous category.

Josh Wolf Analysis is the next category.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.