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October 6, 2005

NIH Public Access Policy Implementation: For NIH-Funded Researchers

Have you written a manuscript that resulted from NIH funding? Has it been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication in a journal? If so, you should be aware of the NIH Public Access Policy, which went into effect May 2, 2005.

The NIH Public Access Policy requests its investigators to submit to the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central an electronic version of that final manuscript, including all modifications from the peer review process, upon acceptance for publication. A separate submission is not necessary if a manuscript has been accepted by a PubMed Central journal that permits free access within 12 months of publication. (Please refer to this list of these PMC journals.) The policy does not apply to book chapters, letters to the editor, reviews, or editorials. This submission fulfills grant progress reporting requirements by substituting deposit for submission of paper copies of articles.

NIH strongly encourages public release in PubMed Central immediately after the final date of journal publication, but PIs have the option to release their manuscripts at a later time, up to 12 months after publication. You will need to clarify this with your journal publisher. Many publishers are working to revise their author agreement forms to make this more evident. This NIH policy does not change the ability of either the author or the publisher to assert copyright.

NIH has provided the secure NIHMS web site for depositing the manuscripts. The site includes information about the policy and the process. Manuscript files can be uploaded to the system by the PI, or with the author's permission, by a 3rd party designee (such as administrative personnel, librarians, or publishers). To submit a manuscript, no further formatting is necessary beyond that required by the accepting journals. The submission process requires an account for the PI on the NIH eRA Commons or MyNCBI for other designated submitters. Step by step submission instructions have been provided by NIH.

You are encouraged to contact us with your questions and concerns as we work together through the issues of policy implementation. If you have questions about the policy or process, please contact Linda Watson (lwatson@umn.edu), Lisa McGuire (lmcguire@umn.edu) or Kevin Messner (messn006@umn.edu).

-- Linda Watson

July 1, 2005

You might as well smoke; the misleading and harmful public message about smokeless tobacco

Results

We found that when any substantive information about the risk from ST is given, the risk is almost universally conflated with the risk from cigarettes. Accurate comparative risk information was quite rare, provided by only a handful of websites, all appearing low in our search results (i.e., of low popularity and thus unlikely to be found by someone searching for information). About 1/3 of the websites, including various authoritative entities, explicitly claimed that ST is as bad as or worse than cigarettes. Most of the other sites made statements that imply the risks are comparable.

Full Article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/5/31