News: August 2004 Archives

PLoS Medicine

PLoS Medicine will go live on 19 October 2004. PLoS Medicine will
commemorate the 10th anniversary of the International Conference on
Population and Development by scoring progress in reproductive health on
September 6.

PLoS Medicine
Fulltext v1+ (2004+)
http://www.plosmedicine.org
Print ISSN: 1549-1277 | Online ISSN: 1549-1676.

Thanks to Susanne DeRisi (PLoS Web Manager) and James Butcher, editor,
PLoS Medicine, for providing extra information following my post
yesterday.

George S. Porter
Sherman Fairchild Library of Engineering & Applied Science
California Institute of Technology
Mail Code 1-43, Pasadena, CA 91125-4300
Telephone (626) 395-3409 Fax (626) 431-2681
http://library.caltech.edu
contributor http://stlq.info |
http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/fosblog.html

UPCOMING SPECIAL SEMINARS

Thursday, August 12, noon to 1:00 p.m., 450 CCRB
"Treatment of Tobacco Addiction: Past, Present and Future"
Dorothy Hatsukami, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Principal Investigator, Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center, University of Minnesota

Tuesday, August 17, noon to 1:00 p.m., 450 CCRB
"Can Diet Protect Against Breast Cancer?"
Mimi C. Yu, Ph.D., Professor, University of Southern California, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center

WOMENíS HEALTH RESEARCH CONFERENCE-2004

Monday, September 13, 2004, 8:30-5:00 p.m., Radisson-Metrodome Hotel, Minneapolis
Sponsor: University of Minnesota National Center of Excellence in Womenís Health
Keynote address: Florence Haseltine, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Center for Population Research

Featured speakers include Cancer Center members Doug Yee, M.D. and Amy Skubitz, Ph.D. Online registration is available at www.womenshealth.umn.edu or contact wmhealth@umn.edu, 612-626-1125.

Friday, September 17, 2004, Holiday Inn-Metrodome, Minneapolis, MN
This meeting is co-sponsored by the Minnesota Medical Association and the Minnesota Black Physicians Foundation. Register online at www.mnmed.org/mapb.

MedlinePlus: Understanding Medical Research

A *NEW* website with information and links on the topic of Understanding Medical Research.

29 Aug 2004

The American Public Health Association responded today to the U.S. Census Bureauís alarming report that the number of uninsured and Americans living in poverty both rose in 2003. The Census Bureau reported that the number of uninsured Americans rose by 1.4 million to 15.6 percent, or 45 million, in 2003, up from 15.2 percent in 2002, the third straight annual increase. Meanwhile, the nationís poverty rate also climbed to 12.5 percent last year, from 12.1 percent in 2002.

The Census Bureau largely attributed the decline in insurance coverage rates to the drop in coverage from employment-based health plans, partially offset by increases in government health coverage. Employment-based health insurance coverage fell 0.9 percentage points between 2002 and 2003, while Medicare coverage increased 0.2 percentage points.

Article from Medical News Today

The American Cancer Society has issued a Request for Applications for the American Cancer Society-Barbara Thomason Research Professorship or Clinical Research Professorship for Ovarian Cancer. The award is intended for an outstanding mid-career investigator who has made seminal contributions to our understanding of the etiology, genetics, pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis or treatment of ovarian cancer and who continues to provide leadership in this research area. Applications from distinguished investigators in all categories of ovarian cancer research, including basic, translational, clinical and applied research, are requested. The amount of the award is $100,000 per year for five years and may be renewed for an additional five years. Candidates must be American citizens or permanent residents with at least 10 years of experience beyond receipt of their terminal degree and within 15 years of their appointment as a full professor. To get more information, click here to view the entire RFA

NEW CANCER CENTER PUBLIC RELATIONS DIRECTOR

Mary Lawson has been recruited as the Public Relations Director and will begin her duties on September 7th. Mary will have primary responsibility for positioning the Cancer Center as a world class center and ensuring that the Center's scientific and medical accomplishments are understood and appreciated by key audiences. Mary has extensive experience in health care and science-related communications and most recently has been part of Mayo Clinic's communications team working in oncology. Contact information: office: 749 CCRB, phone: 624-6165.

UN will award annual public health fellowships in $5 million programme

24 August 2004 Ė The United Nations health agency today announced plans to train as many as 10 young people each year dedicated to improving public health, including upgrading responses to epidemics and other widespread health emergencies, especially in developing countries.

The World Health Organization (WHO), with a special $5 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, today said it will train people younger than 38 years who already hold an advanced public health-related degree. At least half will be women and 80 per cent from developing countries.

Article from UN News Center

Ten-State Mutual Aid Effort for Public Health Emergencies

News Story Aug 24 2004
Nebraska Gov. Mike Johanns announced that Nebraska will designate a portion of next year's federal bioterrorism grant to begin an aggressive effort to develop a ten-state alliance to provide mutual aid in the event of an act of bioterrorism or other public health emergency.

"Mutual aid agreements would vastly increase our response capability by pulling our region together to share expertise and resources in the event of an emergency," Gov. Johanns said. "The interest expressed by our neighboring states leads me to believe the time is now to pursue this effort. Nebraska is already attracting national attention for our collaboration in the public health arena, now we'll extend that effort across state lines."

The governor made the announcement after speaking at a four-state meeting being hosted by Nebraska to discuss bioterrorism collaboration. The other states attending are Iowa, Kansas and Missouri. The ten-state alliance would also include North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming.

Article form Government Today

Survey: Most don't trust public health in case of terrorism

Tuesday, August 24, 2004 Posted: 7:31 PM EDT (2331 GMT)

NEW YORK (AP) -- Most Americans are not confident in the health care system's ability to respond to a biological, chemical or nuclear attack, according to a survey released Tuesday.

The Columbia University poll found that 39 percent of Americans trust the public health system in the event of a major terrorist attack. The number is down from 46 percent in 2003 and 53 percent in 2002.

Article from CNN: Health

"The health care system is decidedly not ready to cope with a major crisis of the type that might include these very aggressive weapons," said Dr. Irwin Redlener, director of the university's National Center for Disaster Preparedness.

Blogging

Hello All...

Off for a few days...I'll cath up by next Tuesday.

Cindy

Public Health Grand Rounds

A National Satellite Broadcast and Webcast

First Things First:
Defining Local Public Health Practice
for Safer, Healthier Communities

What is in a name? or a definition? For public health practice, the answers could determine resource allocation, community expectations, workforce development, and even public health policy. In recent years, public health practice has received unprecedented support and visibility, but there are also unprecedented expectations.

Can everyone expect the same safeguards of health, regardless of the size or location of their community? Local and state health officials believe they can, and this belief is driving the National Association of County and City Health Officials' effort to develop an operational definition of local public health agencies. It is anticipated the definition will provide the framework needed to secure funding and leverage resources needed for a consistent, robust governmental public health presence at the local level.

The purpose is clear but the road map to achieving this has not been easy to follow. To bring clarity to this issue, join us as we discuss the case of Public Health Solutions, a district health department based in Crete , Nebraska , that is working to create a local public health agency from scratch and succeed in meeting the expectations of a safer, healthier community for its citizens.

For more information go to: http://www.publichealthgrandrounds.unc.edu/

Flyer: http://www.publichealthgrandrounds.unc.edu/defining/flyer.pdf

U.S. Hazards Statistics website from National Weather Service

The U.S. Natural Hazard Statistics provide statistical information on fatalities, injuries and damages caused by weather related hazards. These statistics are compiled by the Office of Services and the National Climatic Data Center from information contained in Storm Data, a report comprising data from NWS forecast offices in the 50 states, Puerto Rico, Guam and the Virgin Islands.

Link

Public health authority meets today

August 18, 2004


BY KIM NORRIS
FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER

More than a year after the idea was conceived, the state's first public health authority, dedicated to serving more than 700,000 poor and uninsured people in Wayne County, is to hold its first public meeting today.

Gov. Jennifer Granholm, whose efforts to address the health care crisis in Detroit led to the creation of the Detroit Wayne County Health Authority, is expected to attend the meeting at the St. Francis Cabrini Clinic, 1050 Porter St., Detroit.

Article from the Detroit Free Press

Public Health Grand Rounds

Public Health Grand Rounds, ďFirst Things First: Defining Local Public Health Practice for Safer, Healthier Communities

What is in a name? or a definition? For public health practice, the answers could determine resource allocation, community expectations, workforce development, and even public health policy. In recent years, public health practice has received unprecedented support and visibility, but there are also unprecedented expectations.

Can everyone expect the same safeguards of health, regardless of the size or location of their community? Local and state health officials believe they can, and this belief is driving the National Association of County and City Health Officials' effort to develop an operational definition of local public health agencies. It is anticipated the definition will provide the framework needed to secure funding and leverage resources needed for a consistent, robust governmental public health presence at the local level.

More Information and registration available at: http://www.publichealthgrandrounds.unc.edu/

Word on Health

NIH plays a major role in finding better ways to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent diseases. The practical health information in The NIH Word on Health is based on research conducted either by NIH's own scientists or by our grantees at universities and medical schools around the country.

Material published in The NIH Word on Health is not copyrighted. You may use it without permission of the National Institutes of Health.

Link: http://www.nih.gov/news/WordonHealth/

Computer games teach nutrition

Saturday, August 14, 2004 Posted: 10:41 PM EDT (0241 GMT)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The virtual baked beans were falling fast. The unopened can had to go somewhere, but where? Not the simulated freezer.

"This food wouldn't spoil in that location," the computer-generated voice said. "But the quality of food could be affected, or you might be using space in your freezer unnecessarily."

Another lesson learned from the Fantastic Food Challenge, a package of four computer games designed to teach people who get nutrition aid such as federal food stamps how to make better use of their food.

Article from CNN

Ministers order child medicine safety review

By Severin Carrell
15 August 2004


Drugs companies will be told by health ministers this week to make their medicines safer for children because of fears that many widely used pills have not been properly tested.

Health experts have recently stepped up warnings that children may be wrongly prescribed with drugs, including antibiotics, painkillers, anti-depressants and asthma treatments, because they are rarely tested for use on under-16s.

Article from Independent.co.uk

FDA fears drugs a terror target

Acting commissioner says imported drugs biggest concern

Thursday, August 12, 2004 Posted: 10:29 AM EDT (1429 GMT)


WASHINGTON (AP) -- "Cues from chatter" gathered around the world are raising concerns that terrorists might try to attack the domestic food and drug supply, particularly illegally imported prescription drugs, acting Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Lester M. Crawford says.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Crawford said Wednesday that he had been briefed about al-Qaeda plans uncovered during recent arrests and raids, but declined further comment about any possible threats.

Article from: CNN:Health

Nutrition guidelines: More fruit, vegetables, workouts

Thursday, August 12, 2004 Posted: 11:01 AM EDT (1501 GMT)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Americans need to spend more time working out and less time chowing down.

That's the conclusion of a federal advisory panel looking at ways to get people to adopt healthier eating and exercise habits.

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, holding its final meeting Wednesday, called for some changes in current nutrition recommendations. The tougher task is motivating people to work toward a healthy weight by being more physically active and watching what they eat.

It won't be easy. Federal researchers already have found that almost two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and more than three-fifths do not get enough regular physical activity.

Article from CNN: Health

Public health program receives national award

By The Times-Standard

Sara Watson Arthurs

The National Association of County and City Health Officials has selected the Humboldt County Department of Health and Humans Services' Alcohol and Other Drug Death Review as a Model Practice, one of 29 programs nationwide to receive the award.

The Model Practice Awards program recognizes programs that demonstrate exemplary and replicable qualities in response to a local public health need.

Article from the Times-Standard

First UK license for human cloning

Wednesday, August 11, 2004 Posted: 9:39 AM EDT (1339 GMT)

LONDON, England (AP) -- Britain granted its first license for human cloning Wednesday, more than three years after becoming the first nation to authorize the technique to produce stem cells for medical research.

A team of researchers at Newcastle University hope eventually to create insulin-producing cells that could be transplanted into diabetic patients

Article from CNN:Health

CDC Survey Documents Serious Crisis In Sudanese Refugee Children

HHS/CDC recommend immediate increase in feeding programs, food rations, and public health measures

Sudanese children in refugee camps in northeastern Chad risk serious illness or death from lack of food, clean water, shelter, and health care, say survey findings released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

CDC Link

Project BioShield: The first line of biological defense

Billions of dollars back this initiative to spur development of bioterrorism countermeasures. But new vaccines and treatments are only one aspect of readiness.

By Stephanie Stapleton, AMNews staff. Aug. 16, 2004.

National leaders have always dreamed of the creation of an impenetrable shield or barrier to protect against foreign assaults on American soil. Think fortresses, defense build-ups, interceptor missiles and even the Star Wars program.

Article from amednews.com

Becker was named provost and executive vice president for academic affairs in South Carolina.

By Hayley Odom


ypical days for School of Public Health Dean Mark Becker do not exist.
His routine schedule of leading the school and teaching classes part-time is interrupted by last-minute meetings with student leaders and community members. His evenings are filled with dinners recruiting new faculty members or ceremonies recognizing fellow colleagues.

As dean, Beckerís first priority is the Universityís School of Public Health. But soon his top priority will span an entire university.

Article from mndaily.com

Study: Two health systems -- black and white

Wednesday, August 4, 2004 Posted: 5:11 PM EDT (2111 GMT)





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BOSTON, Massachusetts (Reuters) -- Inferior qualifications and less access to resources among doctors who treat black patients may contribute to racial disparities in the quality of U.S. health care, authors of a study said Wednesday. The study, published in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine, found that many of the doctors treating black patients complain they don't have the resources to adequately care for them.

"The findings paint a picture of two health systems, where physicians treating black patients appear to have less access to important clinical resources and be less well-trained clinically than physicians treating white patients," said study leader Peter Bach of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Article from CNN

Illinois Strengthens its Public Health Authority

News Story Aug 02 2004
Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich recently signed a public health bill that strengthens the state's preparedness and response authority in the event of a bioterrorism attack or a naturally occurring infectious disease outbreak.

"While Illinois is one of the best prepared states in the nation to deal with emergencies, this new law will improve the state's means to control the spread of disease, whether it be an outbreak of a dangerously contagious or infectious disease or the result of bioterrorism," the governor said.

The new law expands the power of state government, particularly the Illinois Department of Public Health, in the event of a public health crisis. It is effective immediately.

From Government Technology

Bulletin of the World Health Organization

The lastest issue of the Bulletin of the World Health Organization has just been published. To go directly to the August table of contents, click on the following link: http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/82/8/en/

Courtesy of Georgia State University Library - Public Health Blog

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries in the News category from August 2004.

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