Magnitude of the Problem

The magnitude of vehicular violence is not a clear-cut picture as there are uncertainties between unintentional and intentional acts. For example, if a driver drove off a road and crashed into a tree and died upon impact, was this an intentional act of suicide or did the driver just loose control. Because of problems such as the one just described, the data that is obtained and disseminated to the public is certainly underreported and potentially misclassified.

Homicide and Suicide
Data taken from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)


  • Between 1999-2006, there were 3,459 transportation-related homicides

  • Transportation-related homicides is ranked 11th of the top 20 leading causes of violence-related injury deaths.

  • 15% of identifiable deaths coded as ICD-10 Y03: Assault (homicide) by crashing of motor vehicle

  • Between 1999-2006, there were 855 transporation-related suicides (0.3% of all suicides)

  • All suicide deaths were coded as ICD-10 X82: Intentional self-harm (suicide) by crashing of motor vehicle

Vehicle Theft
Data taken from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration


  • Available data shows vehicle theft based on model year has increased from 2004 (1.83) to 2006 (2.08 per 1,000 vehicles) but the overall trend since 1993 has been going down.

Road Rage
Data taken from AAA


  • Road rage incidents are more prevalent during rush hour times: 6-8am (10.5%), 2-4pm(15.8%), 4-6pm(25%)

  • 68% of observed incidents occurred during fair weather conditions

  • 37.8% occurred in the summer months

Sexual Assaults
Data taken from Rothe (2008) (Canada) and Saltzman et al. (2007) (United States)
Results from Canada


  • 25% within a vehicle

  • 24% in the victims home

  • 21% in public places

  • 20% in the perpetrator's home

  • 10%in someone else's home


Results from the United States


  • 4.2% (143,647) of assaults that were seen in emergency departments between 2001-2002 were sexual assaults.

  • Locale was not determined

Recent Entries

Outcomes of Selected Acts
Identifying statistics on the health outcome, cost and YPLL for vehicular violence is difficult to come by. In 1997, injuries…
Magnitude of the Problem
The magnitude of vehicular violence is not a clear-cut picture as there are uncertainties between unintentional and intentional acts. For…
References used within the paper
Ayar, A. (2006). Road Rage: recognizing a psychological disorder. The Journal of Psychiatry & Law, 34(Summer).   Bandura, A. (1973).…