Recently in Class Category

Ojibwe Immersion Academy and Scholarship

Boozhoo!

Ojibwemotaadidaa is happy to announce the Niibin 2013 Ojibwe Immersion Academy. The Academy will be held from June 16 - July 6, 2013 at the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Cloquet, MN. The announcement with more information, the academy application, and a scholarship application are attached.

Applications to the 2013 Summer Ojibwe Immersion Academy are due March 4, 2013.

Please contact us if you have any further questions at ojibwemotaadidaa@gmail.com.

We hope you will consider applying!

Scholarship App Ojibwemotaadidaa 2013.doc.docx

Ojibwemotaadidaa Announcement Summer 2013 .doc

Biindigebii-mazina'igan Niibin 2013.doc

May Term, Philosophy Camp

Philosophy 4326/5326 - Lives Worth Living: Questions of self, vocation, and community
http://www.philosophycamp.org/
May Term (May 28th through June 21st, 2013)
John Wallace, Instructor
6-credits
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Come to an INFO SESSION to learn what Philosophy Camp is all about!

February 20th, 12:30-1:30pm, McNeal 22
March 5th, 3:30-4:30, Appleby 240
April 5th, 1:30-2:30, Appleby 240

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Philosophy Camp is the affectionate nickname given by students to the University of Minnesota course
Phil 4326/5326--Lives Worth Living: Questions of Self, Vocation, and Community (6 credits, 4 weeks). Students and instructors meet daily, May 28th through June 21st, 2013, and create a residential living-learning community experience.

Asking questions is central to the practice of philosophy and democratic education. Participants gain a fresh perspective on questions of self, vocation, education, sustainability, and community while enjoying simple living on the prairie of southwestern Minnesota. Students and instructors form a community for living and learning to investigate their own and others responses to questions such as these: What is an authentic self? Who am I? What is vocation? What is my work in the world? What kind of community do I want to have around me? What do I bring to my relationships and community? What makes communities resilient, able to flourish through change and conflict? We'll eat healthy foods, live simply and thoughtfully, work to create and maintain rich nourishing social spaces and discuss how to grow as individuals, community members, and citizens. We create the syllabus democratically based on our interests. We share stories. We share meals together. We learn from each other. Students and instructors also meet local residents to learn how they are living the answers to life's important questions and creating lives worth living. Philosophy Camp is now taking applications for the upcoming 2013 May-term.

Other important details about Philosophy Camp:

Open to freshmen through graduate students
Small community of at most 18 students and 5 instructors
Meets requirements for these LEs: Arts/Humanities & Civic Life and Ethic
Comprehensive program fee is $2300 (less than regular tuition for 6 credits during may/summer)
Transportation to and from Windom will be available
Contact OneStop to verify that your financial aid will be available
Need-based diversity scholarships will be available
Permission number given upon completed application is required to register

Visit http://www.philosophycamp.org for information on this course including application process, cost and financial aid info. Interested students should contact the Philosophy Camp Student Adviser in the Community Service-Learning Center before April 1, 2013. (pcamp@umn.edu, 612-626-2044).

National Student Exchange

Study away in the USA (or Canada)! National Student Exchange (NSE) is a partnership between nearly 200 colleges and universities in the US, Canada, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands that allows undergrads to study at another campus for a semester or year. Most students pay U of M tuition (or instate tuition at their host school) and can apply financial aid toward their exchange!

Students cite various reasons for pursuing NSE:

NSE is very affordable!
Learn independence and self-reliance by getting out of your comfort zone!
Broaden your personal and educational perspectives!
Take courses not available at the U of M:

Biological Research of Salmon Streams and Glacial Watersheds (University of Alaska Southeast)
Geology of the Hawaiian Islands (University of Hawaii at Hilo)
Interesting language offerings: Tongan, Tahitian, Thai, Samoan, Ilokano (University of Hawaii at Manoa)
Marine Invertebrate Zoology (University of the Virgin Islands, St. Thomas)
just to name a few...

Test out the university you may want to go to for graduate school or the region of the country you want to move to after graduation. With an NSE exchange, you get the advantage of living in another part of the country without the hassle of a permanent move!
Experience NCAA sports at another school! 5 of the top 10 ranked college football teams in 2012 are part of NSE (University of Alabama, University of Oregon, University of Georgia, Louisiana State University, University of South Carolina)!
Easily transfer the credits you earn on exchange back to the U of M!
Be immersed at a French-speaking school in Quebec or a Spanish-speaking school in Puerto Rico!
Study at an HBCU (Historically Black College or University)!
Don't limit yourself. Participating in NSE doesn't prohibit you from studying abroad!
And some students just need to get away from Minnesota winters for a short time!

For more information, please visit http://www.offcampusstudy.umn.edu/nse, contact us at 612-626-2044, nseadv@umn.edu or visit us in 240 Appleby Hall. Sign up for an info session or set up a meeting with an advisor to learn about the application process.

THE PREFERRED APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR THE 2013/2014 ACADEMIC YEAR IS FEBRUARY 14TH. Don't delay!

New course: GWSS 4490: Black Feminist Thought

Topic: Black Women, Resistance, and Global Social Change

We will develop diverse answers to these questions:

* How have African descendent women enacted political resistance in the U.S. and the African diaspora?

* What are the primary issues that black women have addressed in their community work?

* How have black women worked across racial-ethnic difference to pursue social justice and equality?

In this course we will examine how black women have promoted social change in the U.S. and abroad by challenging social inequalities. We will study iconic black women in who sparked global social movements to challenge the combined effects of racism, (hetero)sexism, and colonialism globally. These women include Claudia Jones, Fannie Lou Hamer, Shirley Chisholm, Wangari Maathi, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Barbara Lee, and others. We will reflect upon how black women scholars have defined and refined the concept of "intersectionality" to advocate for new ways of studying democracy, civic participation and social movements in the diverse black diasporas. Finally, this course will introduce students to new ways of thinking about politics, careers in advocacy and social justice in diverse black communities, and how to conduct black feminist research across the humanities and social sciences.

Selected Reading List:

Black Women, Cultural Images, and Social Policy (2009) by Julia Jordan-Zachery

Sister Citizen: For Black Women Who Have Considered Suicide When Politics Was Enough (2011) by Melissa Harris Perry

Urban Black Women and the Politics of Resistance (2013) by Zenzele Isoke

Creating Africa in America: Translocal Identity in an Emerging World City (2004) by Jacqueline Copeland-Carson.

Negras in Brazil: Reinvisioning Black Women, Citizenship, and the Politics of Identity by Kia Lilly Caldwell

PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATION SESSION!!

Join MCAE and the U of M School of Public Health to learn more about what public health has to do with you!!

If you have interest in nutrition, the environment, women's health, children's health, health policy, health administration, health disparities, global or local community health, Public Health may be a fit for you!


-Do you brush and floss your teeth?

-If you bike to class- do you wear a helmet and use the bike lanes?

-If you drive to class- do you buckle your seat belt?

-If you walk to class- do you use the crosswalks?

If you do any of these things, a career in Public Health might be for you! Join us to find out what a degree in Public Health has to offer.

We invite you to join Sherlonda Clarke, Coordinator for Diversity and Experiential Learning Programs, for the workshop "What is Public Health?". You will learn the basics of public health, how to become a competitive candidate for admission and scholarships, and why public health needs you.

Session information:

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Time: 3:30 - 4:30 pm

Location: Appleby Hall 41

Space is limited, so register ASAP!!
z.umn.edu/mcaepublichealth

Questions? Contact Pa Lee at leex3372@umn.edu.

We hope to see you there!

PRIDE-GE Summer Institute paid trip and internship.

PRIDE-GE Summer Institute in Cardiovascular Genetic Epidemiology
with a focus on Cardiovascular and other Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders

http://www.biostat.wustl.edu/pridege/index_files/page447.htm

Summer 2013

July 10-July 31, 2013 (New Cohort)

July 28-Aug 15, 2013 (Returning Cohort)

Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine, now offers an all-expense-paid summer institute in genetic epidemiology, sponsored by the NHLBI, for the purpose of increasing diversity in the biomedical research workforce. Junior faculty from Under Represented Minority population groups and faculty with disabilities qualify for this opportunity.

The summer institute is designed to prepare the participants to work at the interface of genetic epidemiology, bioinformatics, cardiovascular disease, and other heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders.

The program includes:

· Two 3-week summer sessions, beginning July 11, 2013.

· Didactic lectures in Genetic Epidemiology and Bioinformatics

· Brief mid-year meeting for all participants with their mentors

· Group meeting with all PRIDE sites and NHLBI for training and networking

· Workshops and lectures on cardiovascular epidemiology and other Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Disorders

· Workshops in grants-writing

· Excellent opportunity to develop research skills necessary for genetic dissection of cardiovascular disease and risk factors

· Opportunity to develop a network of collaborators and resources to conduct research in the genetic epidemiology of cardiovascular disease and risk factors


Core Curriculum

· Fundamentals of Genetic Epidemiology: Heritability, Segregation, Linkage, Association Analysis

· Bioinformatics: Gene Expression, Data Mining and Pattern Recognition

· Survey lectures on special topics

· Group brainstorming sessions during most lunch hours with mentors and mentees for discussing and developing ideas for new grant applications

· Multiple mentor-mentee meetings throughout

Prospective Participants

Junior faculty from an under represented minority (URM) population group or those with a disability would qualify if:

· They have an interest in genetic epidemiology research with a focus on Cardiovascular or other Heart, Lung, Blood, and Sleep Disorders and

· They have an interest in developing an independent research career

Program Faculty

Faculty include world renowned Genetic Epidemiologists such as:

D.C. Rao, Ph.D., Program Director, who is one of the early pioneers of the field with substantive research interests in cardiovascular genetic epidemiology, is the founding editor-in-chief of the journal Genetic Epidemiology, and an early president of the International Genetic Epidemiology Society.

Victor Davila-Roman, M.D., Program Co-Director, is a renowned Cardiologist and an outstanding cardiovascular geneticist with established research programs in the fields of cardiac imaging and hypertension.

Treva Rice, Ph.D., Course Master, is an outstanding genetic epidemiologist with research preeminence in the effects of gene-environment interactions involving nutrition and physical activity on cardiovascular disease and risk factors.

Jinquin (Rosy) Luo, PhD, Course Master, has research interests of statistical methodology development and application involving classification methods, diagnostic test, variable selection, survival analysis and covariance estimation.

Additional Faculty

A host of other internationally renowned and outstanding faculty leaders from Washington University and other leading programs also participate in this program such as: Donna Arnett (University of Alabama), Eric Boerwinkle (University of Texas Health Science Center), George Bonney (Howard University), Ingrid Borecki, Anne Bowcock, Ross Brownson, Mario Castro, Aravinda Chakravarti (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), James Cheverud, Shweta Choudhry (University of California, San Francisco), F. Sessions Cole, Michael DeBaun, Lisa de las Fuentes, James Gavin III (Emory University), C. Charles Gu, Andrew Heath, Aldi Kraja, Ronald Krone, Pamela Madden, Douglas Mann, J. Philip Miller, Aubrey Morrison, Michael Province, Susan Racette, John Rice, Charles Rotimi (NHGRI and CRGGH), Kenneth Schechtman, and Yun Ju Sung.

Application Materials: http://www.biostat.wustl.edu/pridecc/?page_id=93

1. Complete Pre Application Form

2. Upon request, complete the Full Application which consists of:

· Application Form

· Curriculum Vita

· Summary of academic work or research experience in Biostatistics, SAS, and Biological Sciences and Genetics

· Statement of research interest in CVD genetic epidemiology

· Recommendation Form and Letters of support from Department Chair and Mentor or Colleague

Apply Early. Rolling Admissions until all slots are filled with a target deadline of March 1, 2013.

Contact Information:

Linda Schreier, PRIDE Program Administrator

Division of Biostatistics

Washington University School of Medicine

Campus Box 8067, 660 S. Euclid

St Louis, MO 63110

PH: 314-362-1565

FAX: 314-362-2693

Email: PRIDE-GE@wubios.wustl.edu

Website: www.biostat.wustl.edu/pridege

American Indian Studies Advising Hours in the Circle of Indigenous Nations:

American Indian Studies Advising Hours in the Circle of Indigenous Nations:

Want to learn more about the American Indian Studies major or minor?

Or are you a current American Indian Studies student and need to connect with your adviser?

Ali Miesen, department adviser for American Indian Studies, will hold a weekly advising hour in the Circle of Indigenous Nations starting next week.

Stop by on Wednesdays from 1:00-2:00 in 322 Appleby Hall for any questions related to the American Indian Studies program, and Ali will be happy to help you out.

Course: Asian American Health and Research

Fall 2012 Course
AAS 3920/GWSS 3920
Asian American Health and Research

Dr. Melissa Kwon (mkwon@umn.edu)
Tuesdays, 5:10-7:40 p.m.
3 credits

This course provides training in social science research methods within the context of Asian and Pacific Islander (API) women and public health. Students will learn about API women's health issues both locally and nationally and conduct community-based research. This course will combine research, advocacy, and leadership development using principles of social science research and Asian American studies. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a national API leadership training in Washington, D.C. or Arizona.

New Class, Latinos in Global Cities

This course explores the relationship between Latina/o immigration and the development of New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Miami into global cities. We begin this course by defining the "global city" and its place within national and international contexts. We then move on to a consideration of the foundational role Latina/o immigrants play in the creation of such cities by examining the diverse experiences and histories of Latino communities in the Unites States. This comparative framework allows us to consider the similarities and differences among the socio- political trajectories of Latina/o communities. We focus specifically on case studies of Mexicans in Los Angeles, Puerto Ricans in Chicago, Dominicans in New York City, and Cubans in Miami. This course will provide us with a better understanding of the cities we live in and the people who sustain them.
The class will rely on an interdisciplinary approach to race, class, sexuality, and gender relations. We will discuss a broad array of topics such as: immigration, labor conflicts, street life, social movements, bilingual education, and art and the built environment. This course fulfills the "Social Science" liberal education core requirement and the thematic liberal education requirement "Diversity and Social Justice in the United States". Finally, this course includes an optional service learning component based on student collaboration with community organizations that service the Latino community in the Twin Cities.
For questions or additional information, please contact the instructor at mbc@umn.edu.

LGC Flyer.pdfLGC Flyer.pdf

Graduate Prep Course


I want to invite you to continue your graduate school
exploration by registering for a 1 credit course being offered this
Fall 2012 entitled, "Graduate & Professional School: Success
Strategies Prep". The course is taught by Patricia Jones Whyte,
director of the Office for Diversity in Graduate Education, and will
span one half or 8 weeks of the semester from 9/4/12-10/22/12.

This course is especially important for those of you who will be
juniors and seniors this year. You do not want to reach the point of
graduation and have to wait a year to apply to graduate or
professional school because you do not have a competitive application
ready to submit. You can find the registration information for this
course under:

CFAN 3480 Topics in CFANS
Graduate & Professional School: Success Strategies Prep
#24048 Section 1
3:35-4:25, Tu
Folwell Hall 122
1 credit

Asian American Studies Course--FALL 2012

Asian American Health and Research
Fall 2012 - AAS 3920/GWSS 3920
Dr. Melissa Kwon
Tuesdays, 5:10-7:40pm
3 credits

Course Description:

This course provides intensive training in social science research methods within the context of Asian and Pacific Islander (API) women and public health. Students will learn about API women's health issues both locally and nationally. They will then apply this knowledge by actively researching a women's health topic that most affects the UMN campus community. Students will be required to work collaboratively to conduct community‐based research and analyze and interpret data. Students' personal experiences and perspectives will be critical in completing class assignments and fully participating in class. This course will combine research, advocacy, and leadership development using the frameworks and principles of social science research, Asian American studies, public health, and social justice. This course will count towards the Asian American Studies minor.
AAS GWSS 3920 Fall 2012.pdf

Global Leadership for Social Change: A Cedar Riverside Immersion

ID 3960: Global Leadership for Social Change: A Cedar Riverside Immersion

This is a unique course that is based entirely in the Cedar Riverside neighborhood where students will be meeting with leaders in the community in the areas of arts, new Americans, and community organizing/co-ops to look at how people are creating positive social change. The application deadline has been extended to Monday, April 2nd.

$500 scholarships are available. The course is 3 credits with an additional $144 course fee to cover meals in the neighborhood, a theater performance and an overnight stay at Middlebrook the first weekend so the scholarship would cover about 40% of the cost of the course.

Here is the link to the brief application that includes information about applying for the scholarship http://global.umn.edu/icc/documents/12_glp_may_session_app.pdf and here is the link more information about the course http://global.umn.edu/icc/glp.html#maysession.

CAIMH Native Americans into Medicine Program 2012

Greetings!

We are excited to announce that Center of American Indian and Minority Health (CAIMH), University of Minnesota Medical School, will once again be offering the Native Americans into Medicine (NAM) program for undergraduates in 2012! This 6-week summer program will be held from June 18th - July 27th, 2012 on the University of Minnesota Duluth campus. NAM participants learn how to develop their personal and professional skills to become a physician or other type of health professional. Curriculum focuses on math and science coursework resembling health professions school content, as well as writing and computer skills. Students also meet with Native American health professionals, community members, and medical school faculty. Participants receive a weekly stipend while participating in the NAM program.

CAIMH will also be offering a new program in collaboration with Fond du Lac Reservation. Stepping Stones to Health Careers (SSHC) is for high school students who will be going into grade 10, 11 or 12 in fall 2012. SSHC provides two one-week residential opportunities on the University of Minnesota Duluth Medical School campus July 8th-13th and/or July 15th-20th. Students will explore health-related sciences, healthy living, research, and college preparation. Each week will have different topics and activities. Current medical students provide advice and inspiration as they interact with the participants in various activities during the sessions. Students may participate in week 1, week 2, or both weeks, but must return home between week 1 and week 2. On campus housing and meals are provided.

The Pre-Admission Workshop (PAW), hosted by CAIMH and Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) will be held July 30th-August 1st, 2012. The Pre-Admission Workshop addresses common challenges encountered by Native American students in the medical school application process. Join us in Anchorage, AK to learn more about MCAT preparation, financial aid and scholarship resources, writing a personal statement, filling out the AMCAS application, how to present yourself in an interview and more! College Juniors, Seniors and recent graduates are eligible to apply for this opportunity.


For more information on NAM, SSHC or PAW or to apply for one or more of the programs, please visit our website at http://www.caimh.umn.edu/summer/home.html.


Sincerely,
Jessica Zibell

Philosophies of Ethics and Peace: India

Honors Seminar 3014 H (Spring 2012)

Philosophies of Ethics and Peace: India

12:45PM- 2:00PM MW (01/17/2012-05/04/2012)
Nicholson Hall 12, TCEASTBANK
Professor Indira Y. Junghare
Jungh001@umn.edu

This course will explore diverse philosophies of ethics and peace with focus on India: orthodox and heterodox; idealistic and realistic; socio-cultural/collective and individualistic. Indian philosophies covered include Vedic-Upanishadic (Vedantic) eternalism, Buddhist constant fluctuation, Carvakian materialism, Gandhi's socio-political philosophy of peaceful resistance, naturalism, and Sufism. The influence of these philosophies on the West will be considered. Topics will include the fundamental nature of individuals (selves), their relationships with the external world of humans, animals, plants and microbes; the nature of societies, and use of ethical principles in shaping institutions, social roles and personal values, with special reference to India's cultural traditions.

The course will assess the correspondence of ideal visions to the real world of individual and social existence confronted with problems of industrialization, modernization, cosmopolitanism, and conflict.


REGISTER FOR SPRING CAREER CLASSES NOW!

ID 3201, CAREER PLANNING (2 CREDITS)

This class teaches advanced job-search strategies like marketplace
research, networking, interviewing, strong resume writing, and more.
Aimed at juniors and seniors but open to everyone.

http://www.clacareer.umn.edu/careerclasses/ID3201.html

ID 1201, MAJOR AND CAREER EXPLORATION (2 CREDITS)

During this class you'll connect your own interests and skills to
potential careers. You'll also get help choosing a major, or,
exploring careers related to the major you already chose. Aimed at
freshmen and sophomores.

http://www.clacareer.umn.edu/careerclasses/ID1201.html

ID 3208, INTERNSHIP REFLECTION
(1 CREDIT, ONLINE)

This is an online class open to all U of M sophomores, juniors and
seniors. It helps you get more out of your internship by reflecting on
it and connecting it to your career goals. To take this class, you
must be starting an internship at the beginning of the Spring 2012
semester. Learn more at

http://www.clacareer.umn.edu/careerclasses/ID3208Intern.html

Racial Formation and Transformation in the United States

Spring 2012 AFRO/AMIN/AAS/CHIC 1201

Racial Formation and Transformation in the United States

Liberal Education Theme: "Diversity & Social Justice in the United States" Mondays and Wednesdays 10:10am-11:25am

Blegen Hall, Room 130

Yuichiro Onishi
Assistant Professor of African American & African Studies/Asian American Studies

What does it take to discuss race seriously?
An exploration of this question demands a counter-narrative, for our contemporary moment is such that a growing public opinion (1) casts America as a "raceless" nation, (2) interprets antiracism as "reverse racism," and (3) embraces "diversity" to maintain the racial status quo. Talking about race is not easy to be sure; it engenders a host of unsettling emotions ranging from guilt and shame to anger. Yet not talking about race as a social fact in American life and culture merely reinforces the existing racial hierarchy. It forecloses opportunities to reach across boundaries of social difference to strive toward a shared sense of community and belonging. Together, we will participate in racial struggles, albeit at times painful and challenging, to address and grapple with ethico-political imperatives to pursue social justice and make the notion of diversity anew.

For more information, contact: ohni0001@umn.edu

Aas 1201 Flyer.pdf

LING 5900: LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL IDENTITY

SPRING 2012 Class
LING 5900: LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL IDENTITY
3 credits, (Class Number 68432) 12:45PM- 2:00PM TTh
(01/17/2012-05/04/2012), Fol 119, TCEASTBANK


The language we use forms an important part of our identity. The course will explore the role of language in constructing diverse identities: gender, national, ethnic, and religious. Throughout the world, and particularly in Western society, there are now strong pressures for social and racial integration. Some sociolinguistic studies have shown that greater intergroup contact can actually reinforce social distinctions and ethnic stereotypes. The course will examine conversational mechanisms, discourse conventions, socio-cultural factors, and tensions between personal and collective identities and politics of multilingualism.

The course will be of importance to linguists, anthropologists, psychologists and others interested in cross-cultural communication.

Professor Indira Y. Junghare
For more information, please e-mail:

Rev Flyer Linguistics 5900 Language and Identity.docx

Graduate and Professional: Success Strategies for Preparation, Admission and Beyond

Graduate and Professional School: Success Strategies for Preparation, Admission, and Beyond (1 credit)

Course number: CFAN 3480, Section 1
Course dates: Tuesdays, 9/6/2011 - 10/25/2011 (8 weeks)
Course meeting time: 3:35 - 4:25 p.m.
Location: STSS 121
Instructors: Starr Sage, Ph.D. (sage0005@umn.edu) and Ah Vang-Lo, M.Ed. (vang0464@umn.edu)

Course description: This course is intended for juniors and seniors--of all majors--with interests in career exploration and the pursuit of either graduate or professional school education (in any field). The course is designed to address the needs of multicultural students and those from diverse backgrounds who may be first-generation college students. Students will learn about numerous University resources that will ensure their success as undergraduates and prepare them to be successful candidates for graduate or professional school.

Enrollment is limited to 25 students!

Graduate and Professional School: Success Strategies for Preparation, Admission, and Beyond

Graduate and Professional School: Success Strategies for Preparation, Admission, and Beyond (1 credit)

Course number: CFAN 3480, Section 1
Course dates:Tuesdays,1/19/2010 - 3/12/2010 (8 weeks)
Course meeting time: 3:35 - 4:25 PM
Location:ME 1130
Instructor: Starr Sage, Ph.D. (sage0005@umn.edu)

Course description: This course is intended for junior and seniors- of all majors- with interests in career exploration and the pursuit of either graduate or professional school education (in any field). The course is designed to address the needs of multicultural students and those from diverse backgrounds who may be first generation college students. Students will learn about numerous University resources that will ensure their success as undergraduates and prepare them to be successful candidates for graduate or professional school. In addition, students will explore various program options, as well as application processes, admission requirements, success strategies, and expectations of graduate and professional students. Whether or not students have already considered attending graduate or professional school, this course is intended to help them solidify their post--‐ undergraduate plans. The course format involves lectures, discussions and interactive activities, as well as guest speakers and panel presentations. Course readings, assignments, and exercises are all intended to guide students to explore their options and prepare for post--‐baccalaureate education.

Enrollment is limited to 25 students!

LING 5900: Language and Social Identity

Spring 2011 Offering

LING 5900: LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL IDENTITY

3 credits, Class Number 71385)
12:45PM- 2:00PM TTh (01/18/2011-05/06/2011), Eddy Hall 102, TCEASTBANK

The language we use forms an important part of our identity. The course will explores the role of language in constructing diverse identities: gender, national, ethnic, and religious. Throughout the world, and particularly in Western society, there are now strong pressures for social and racial integration. Some sociolinguistic studies have shown that greater intergroup contact can actually reinforce social distinctions and ethnic stereotypes. The course will examine conversational mechanisms, discourse conventions, sociocultural factors, and tensions between personal and collective identities and politics of multilingualism.

The course will be of importance to linguists, anthropologists, psychologists and others interested in cross-cultural communication.

Professor Indira Y. Junghare
For more information, please call 612-624-4118 (e-mail: jungh001@tc.umn.edu)

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