Assignment #4 - Utensil

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Photos were once again giving me issues so I have written my blog post for this assignment over here.

Assignment #3 - Plating

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I was having issues with the blog here all night. My post can be viewed here:

http://foodandesign.wordpress.com/

Sweet Bacondaise - Assignment #2

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This assignment we were introduced to the single, bite-sized hors d'œuvre, the amuse-bouche. I had never heard of this concept of an amuse-bouche before. I instantly racked my brain for my favorite tastes and fall times and ingredients that go together.

I started jotting down a few flavour combinations that first popped into my head.

IMG_20131016_172539_214.jpg

I heavily considered doing carrots and parsnips for the longest time. One of my favourite things to do is to make honey roasted carrots and parsnips. You slice carrots and parsnips into sticks and put them in a pan with butter and honey. Unfortunately I didn't know how well it would translate with other flavours and decided against it. Plus, I wanted to challenge myself by doing something new. But I regress. I then started writing different flavour combinations in my notebook for different ingredients. Below is the page I did for tomatoes.

IMG_20131016_172620_440.jpg

I did pages for a few other ingredients as well. Anyways, I started my assignment working with potatoes. I cooked them in a pan of water.

IMG_20131009_213548_541.jpg

After they got soft I mashed them and added green onion and pepper. I made a hollandaise sauce to top the potatoes off thinking that it would be a good gravy substitute and also be my transformation element.

IMG_20131009_215823_998.jpg

It tasted alright but it was extremely mushy and quite frankly reminded me of baby food. The piece on top was some ham that I thought would maybe round out the flavours. I tried a version with mashed turnips as well and it didn't work out too well either.

IMG_20131015_230206_952.jpg

Actually, speaking of. This was my first attempt at hollandaise.

IMG_20131009_213544_296.jpg

I tried adding ginger and brown sugar to it. But the real problem was that I introduced the butter too quickly and all at once.


I decided to take a break from experimenting and one night last week while tutoring I had an idea. I had been contemplating using carrots and possibly making carrot pancakes or cake. I thought the carrot cake idea would be too easy and not creative so I moved on from it. I knew from experimenting with the hollandaise that I liked it but, it needed to be paired with something not mushy. Luckily while tutoring last week my student happened to be eating food. He happened to have Famous Dave's and I asked him what the thing was in the cupcake liner. I was assuming it wasn't a cupcake since it didn't have frosting on it. He said that they put cornbread muffins in the liners when they make big orders. It hit me then, what if I make a cornbread muffin? I can put something in it. Carrots? No, too close to cake. Then it hit me again. Sweet potatoes. It was perfect. I was able to finish my notebook jotting during this tutoring session and fill in the dots.

src="http://blog.lib.umn.edu/mcbr0143/1715/IMG_20131016_095044_490.jpg" width="500" height="375" class="mt-image-none" style="" />

Finally, I had direction. I made the cornbread muffins and to the dry stuff I added mashed sweet potatoes.

IMG_20131016_093621_488.jpg

IMG_20131016_173040_655.jpgIMG_20131016_095044_490.jpg


Otherwise I made the muffins similarly to how they are normally made. I just reduced the amounts of some of the liquids, like the milk. They turned out better than I had hoped and were really good!

IMG_20131016_111052_211.jpg

I also decided to think about the transformed element. I made a whipped topping with maple syrup instead of powdered sugar and vanilla.

IMG_20131015_222434_824.jpg

It tasted okay but was overly sweet since I had to add quite a bit of syrup to get the maple flavour just right. I thought it was odd since I was using pure maple syrup.


I experimented my hollandaise too. The first time I made it with the normal mashed potatoes I forgot to just use the egg yolk.

IMG_20131015_215726_846.jpg

This time around I experimented with flavour additions. I tried two different ones. A honey-ginger one and a maple one. The maple one had a nice maple flavour that wasn't overpowering. The honey-ginger one was okay but something about it was off. One thing was still missing though. And that thing was bacon. I decided on making candied bacon. Unfortunately, I accidentally bought fully cooked bacon. So when I went to open the package of bacon to doctor with pepper and brown sugar I had pieces of already cooked bacon. I took the pre-cooked bacon strips and put them in a pan with a water solution of brown sugar and then cracked black pepper on top of them. I let the water come to a simmer and evaporate leaving me with candied bacon. I added the walnuts as a last second addition and I decided they would taste better candied so I tossed them in the same solution as the bacon on the pan for a little while and was pleased with the effect.

So my final description for this assignment is as follows:

Sweet potato cornbread muffin, topped with a maple hollandaise, candied bacon and walnuts.

IMG_20131016_111039_869.jpg

And there you have the Sweet Bacondaise, which I've become quite fond of. I told my parents I have something new to make for them when I'm home next!

Sweet Bacondaise - Assignment #2

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This assignment we were introduced to the single, bite-sized hors d'œuvre, the amuse-bouche. I had never heard of this concept of an amuse-bouche before. I instantly racked my brain for my favorite tastes and fall times and ingredients that go together.

I started jotting down a few flavour combinations that first popped into my head.

IMG_20131016_172539_214.jpg

I then started writing different flavour combinations in my notebook for different ingredients. Below is the page I did for tomatoes.

IMG_20131016_172620_440.jpg

I did pages for a few other ingredients as well. Anyways, I started my assignment working with potatoes. I cooked them in a pan of water.

IMG_20131009_213548_541.jpg

After they got soft I mashed them and added green onion and pepper. I made a hollandaise sauce to top the potatoes off thinking that it would be a good gravy substitute and also be my transformation element.

IMG_20131009_215823_998.jpg

It tasted alright but it was extremely mushy and quite frankly reminded me of baby food. The piece on top was some ham that I thought would maybe round out the flavours. I tried a version with mashed turnips as well and it didn't work out too well either.

IMG_20131015_230206_952.jpg

Actually, speaking of. This was my first attempt at hollandaise.

IMG_20131009_213544_296.jpg

I tried adding ginger and brown sugar to it. But the real problem was that I introduced the butter too quickly and all at once.


I decided to take a break from experimenting and one night last week while tutoring I had an idea. I had been contemplating using carrots and possibly making carrot pancakes or cake. I thought the carrot cake idea would be too easy and not creative so I moved on from it. I knew from experimenting with the hollandaise that I liked it but, it needed to be paired with something not mushy. Luckily while tutoring last week my student happened to be eating food. He happened to have Famous Dave's and I asked him what the thing was in the cupcake liner. I was assuming it wasn't a cupcake since it didn't have frosting on it. He said that they put cornbread muffins in the liners when they make big orders. It hit me then, what if I make a cornbread muffin? I can put something in it. Carrots? No, too close to cake. Then it hit me again. Sweet potatoes. It was perfect. I was able to finish my notebook jotting during this tutoring session and fill in the dots.

src="http://blog.lib.umn.edu/mcbr0143/1715/IMG_20131016_095044_490.jpg" width="500" height="375" class="mt-image-none" style="" />

Finally, I had direction. I made the cornbread muffins and to the dry stuff I added mashed sweet potatoes.

IMG_20131016_093621_488.jpg

IMG_20131016_173040_655.jpgIMG_20131016_095044_490.jpg


Otherwise I made the muffins similarly to how they are normally made. I just reduced the amounts of some of the liquids, like the milk. They turned out better than I had hoped and were really good!

IMG_20131016_111052_211.jpg

I also decided to think about the transformed element. I made a whipped topping with maple syrup instead of powdered sugar and vanilla.

IMG_20131015_222434_824.jpg

It tasted okay but was overly sweet since I had to add quite a bit of syrup to get the maple flavour just right. I thought it was odd since I was using pure maple syrup.


I experimented my hollandaise too. The first time I made it with the normal mashed potatoes I forgot to just use the egg yolk.

IMG_20131015_215726_846.jpg

This time around I experimented with flavour additions. I tried two different ones. A honey-ginger one and a maple one. The maple one had a nice maple flavour that wasn't overpowering. The honey-ginger one was okay but something about it was off. One thing was still missing though. And that thing was bacon. I decided on making candied bacon. Unfortunately, I accidentally bought fully cooked bacon. So when I went to open the package of bacon to doctor with pepper and brown sugar I had pieces of already cooked bacon. I took the pre-cooked bacon strips and put them in a pan with a water solution of brown sugar and then cracked black pepper on top of them. I let the water come to a simmer and evaporate leaving me with candied bacon. I added the walnuts as a last second addition and I decided they would taste better candied so I tossed them in the same solution as the bacon on the pan for a little while and was pleased with the effect.

So my final description for this assignment is as follows:

Sweet potato cornbread muffin, topped with a maple hollandaise, candied bacon and walnuts.

IMG_20131016_111039_869.jpg

The Pile (better known as assignment #1)

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I decided to model my dessert after a French Silk Pie, which is one of my favorite things to make. I wanted to make a chocolate rice cake to use as the pie 'filling' layer. The crust layer was originally going to be a graham cracker, walnut, and brown sugar crust but I decided I wanted more crunch. I changed the crust to a Ritz cracker and butter crust. The whipped topping portion I chose to keep the same to my recipe for French Silk Pie. I did end up experimenting with the addition of almond extract to it however.

I last left off discussing my plans to try and make the rice cake from the Korean dish dokkboki and incorporate it into my dish. I tried. Really hard to make it work. In fact, I tried too long on that idea and unfortunately ended up running out of time to refine my new idea.

But I regress.

Making garaeddeok was in itself a challenge. The ingredient that takes the longest time is the rice flour (at least if you make it from scratch). First you need to scrub the rice and rinse it several times. After that you put the rice in a container, covered with water, so as to soak the rice (preferably short grain rice) for at least 8-12 hours. After that, you strain it and then food process it while it is still wet to get a slightly damp rice flour.

DSC00970-1.jpg

Once the rice is nice and flour-ed? you usually sift it. Unfortunately I own no sifter, nor do my 11 roommates. So I had to make do with this.

DSC00980-1.jpg

It sort of worked for a time at least. At this point I was now able to make garaeddeok. I added boiling water and some sesame oil (I had no sweeter or no taste oils on hand at the time) to the rice flour. I used the microwave a few times and heated it up, stirring inbetween. This left me with a very thick dough which I then had to pound for roughly 5 minutes so the cake became very elastic-ky.

DSC00983-1.jpg

Word to the wise, great upper arm strength would be a boon for this task. At this point I tried introducing my cocoa powder and sugar but they didn't take as well to the cake as I had hoped. On another variation I remembered to add the cocoa powder and sugar to the rice flour mixture before adding the water. This worked much better.

DSC00986-1.jpg

In one of my early renditions of the rice cake (see above) I chopped up walnuts to use as a coating. However, it didn't stick to the cake that well since the cake is chewy and not necessarily sticky enough for the nuts to stay.

As mentioned earlier, I definitely tried out my rice cake idea for too long. The first attempt at the rice cake turned out okay. It cooked well (I put it in boiling water for about 5 minutes or so) they held together for the most part but, they were soggy. Getting past the sogginess, texturally, it tasted the same as I've had before. However, my other attempts did not work out as well.

IMG_20130924_234839_094.jpg

They ended up looking something like that. I decided to 'coin' slice the dough thinking that if I shorted the cook time maybe they would turn out better. That was incorrect thinking. I believe what was happening was I had switched the sesame oil out for coconut oil which is soft, but still somewhat solid at room temp. I had to heat the coconut oil up before I could add it to the rice flour. When I went to go cook the rice cake it would fall apart.

I then tried out processing cooked rice.

IMG_20130925_241601_487.jpg

No dice. It was the creamy texture that I was looking for; however, I forgot about the starch factor. It was too starchy that I needed several classes of water to get rid of the cotton-mouth feeling. Back to square one.

So last night after I got home from work, I finally had enough time to test out one more idea. I was torn letting go of the rice cake idea given all the time I spent trying to make it work but, alas, it was not meant to be. What I did was I cooked the rice on the stove. After it was done I removed it from the heat and strained it, pouring cold water on it immediately to cool it down and prevent it from cooking any more. I then heated up condensed milk and cocoa power. It didn't turn out the way I wanted to so I decided to use peanut butter instead since I happened to have a jar of it. Heating up the peanut butter worked to make it soft enough to gently stir into the cooked rice. Adding some cinnamon I created a rice mixture that reminded me of the 'glorified' rice my high school served. However, not to knock the lunch ladies, but I believe mine tasted much better. I layered this mixture over a Ritz cracker crust. Since I only had one container of heavy whipping cream on hand I forwent making it last night; I am very familiar with the flavour profile of it so I felt I had a good idea of how it would fit in. I decided it tasted okay; however, since I was modeling the dish after French Silk Pie I felt that I really needed to incorporate chocolate to the dish. Using evaporated milk, a dab of condensed milk, cocoa powder, powdered sugar, vanilla extract,and chili powder; I created a chocolate sauce to drizzle over my dessert. I went for the chili powder because I thought it would create a nice subtle contradicting flavour to combat the overall sweetness of the dish. While cleaning up I happened to cut up a banana to not let my chocolate sauce go to waste. I ended up trying the banana with my dessert and lo and behold, I liked the combination more than I thought I would.

Unfortunately though, when looking through my photos on my phone there was a black picture where my finished dessert should have been. I'll save you from having to see that disappointing picture. If I would have only known, I would have taken a picture this morning.

And that is the story behind The Pile.

Assignment #1: Innovation Creation

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This past Monday we were given the details of our first assignment for this course. The assignment has a few components to it. The main component to this assignment is to innovate a dish using either white rice or orzo pasta. The secondary component is to document our process in creating our innovative dish.

My immediate reaction was to think, "I'm definitely not in Carlson anymore" and my second reaction was to run through my mind different recipes with white rice. My thoughts first jumped to congee, which is a rice porridge-y dish that I believe has Chinese roots. It's made with rice, broth, and eggs. You can essentially add whatever vegetables and meat you want to it. I also considered making a curry too.

But, after reflecting a bit on it I did wonder if both of these directions were too obvious. The point of the assignment is to 'innovate' right? So, I regressed. I toyed around with the idea of using the orzo pasta but decided against it. I have actually never worked with orzo and could not think of what to do with it off the top of my head. While maybe I should try challenging myself in that way someday, I chose not to for this particular assignment. Since I need to innovate using my chosen grain, I feel more comfortable innovating with rice; which trust me, I know plenty about rice.

Anyways, after class today I had a thought while riding the campus connector back to Minneapolis. What if I try doing a dessert? Rice pudding is one of the only desserts that come to mind besides some unknown Asian desserts I've had in the past. One of my dessert specialties happens to be French silk pie. I think I might experiment with making a rice crust; possibly with some spicy elements to it to create a different type of flavor for the French silk. My parents recently brought me some rice from home and said it was a different kind than we usually get. I have to cook it tonight to taste it but, they said it was called sweet Thai rice. Not sure if I've had it before but it might be exactly what I need to experiment with a rice crust.

Another idea I've had for this assignment is to make dokbokki. It's a Korean rice cake-y dish. You use cooked rice to create rice flower and then make it into a dough and form it. It's extremely popular. I might try messing with the textures of the dokbokki to see if I can create an unexpected addition of crunchy to it. Dokbokki is a soft, spongy dish.

A Rose by Any Other Name...

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In case you were wondering about the name of my blog, here is a brief reason as to why I named it Anju.

So in Korea there are dishes called anju. Basically, anju dishes are the Korean version of appetizers or tapas. They accompany alcoholic drinks frequently. In some restaurants in Korea you are even required to order anju plates along with your drinks.

I am adopted from South Korea and returned to visit the country for roughly two and a half weeks the summer after freshman year. Some of my favorite dishes happened to be anju dishes. Not very deep but, that is why I named my blog Anju.

안녕!

DES 1715: Food & Design

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Food & Design.

When I told my parents I signed up for this course, they were astonished that it could go towards my Design minor. However, they were happy for me because they know how much I enjoy cooking. Last semester, Spring 2013, I was in Toy Product Design. In class, Barry mentioned that he had created this Food & Design course if any of us were interested in trying to take it this fall. Needless to say I scheduled my other courses around this class.

For me, this course is a way to do something I really like to do in my free time while getting a unique understanding of the design principles of creating dishes. While it is still early, I am fairly positive this is my favorite class this semester. I mean, I highly doubt that my managerial accounting professor is going to let me bring a knife to class to chop up vegetables while we look at cost structure.