The Third Age | Social | Mo Becker

| 7 Comments

It's no secret that the green movement has become immensely popular in both social and business settings. Like Patrick mentioned in his last post, companies are going as far as to 'greenwash' their companies by advertising green practices that they actually do not do. It's just their way of capitalizing on the so-called green craze. However, there is an up side to all these shenanigans. Besides having a more environmentally conscious society, there has been a surge of various creative ways to reduce, recycle and re-use. In this example, Dave Rittinger has made shirts out of fallen leaves. This is a prime example of getting back to basics. With no manufacturing, transporting, dying, and very little materials used; green has officially become the next trendy thing.

Although many companies still try to save money by cutting corners and not taking into account the environmental ramifications, there is a growing trend of companies and businesses that put quality and responsibility before making an extra few dollars. UNStudio is a design studio that specializes in energy efficient architecture. Their most recent accomplishment is having their design chosen for the new Singapore University of Technology and Design. This facility will earn the highest rating in energy efficiency that is given in Singapore.

Another social happening revolving around the third age is recycled fashion. Fashion Designer Gary Harvey, has coined the term 'Dumpster Chic' for New York Fashion week. Using materials that are found in dumpsters such as copies of the Financial Times, old baseball jackets, and empty skincare packaging he creates dresses and gowns. My main point being that being green isn't just for hippies and tree-huggers anymore. It's a part of our society and our culture.

7 Comments

The Harvey dresses are actually pretty interesting. He's created some really nice silhouettes for that collection, especially the newspaper gown. As far as the Weleda dress though, I wonder what the process was to actually mold that dress- if he had to melt the plastic packages or use some sort of chemical bonding agent to adhere the separate pieces, then the dress might not be as eco-friendly as intended. Regardless, its nice to see that "green" also has its place in couture fashion.

This blog post reminds me of a project I came across a couple years ago called "The Reverse Graffiti Project" . It's about the collaboration of a "reverse" graffiti artist and a documentary film maker in order to silmultaneously create an environmentally friendly piece of graffiti art and a film about the philosophy of clean.

"San Francisco’s Broadway tunnel is a highly traveled thoroughfare in the heart of the city. Over 20,000 cars, trucks, and motorized vehicles pass through it per day. Its walls are caked with dirt and soot, and lined with patches of paint covered graffiti from days gone by. It set the perfect canvas to create a beautiful work of art showcasing the talents of reverse graffiti artist “Moose”, and the power of Green Worksplant based cleaner."

At first, I thought that this was one of the coolest urban art projects that had come around in a long time, but then I soon realized that this project was sponsored by Green Works - a sub-brand of Clorox. Needless to say, my tone was changed. However, after taking a little bit of time to think about it all, I realized that I would rather have Green Works (Clorox) attempting to be "greener" than normal and supporting environmentally focused activities (especially art!). While I think it's easy to critique them by saying that they could do a much better job than this at being green, when I really think about it, can't we all? I suppose a little bit of effort is better than none at all.

It's hard (for me at least) to not become unfairly jaded towards the 'green' revolution - with so much being shoved down our throats with commercials, advertisements, and the visual shit-splosion when you're trying to buy soap or toilet paper, it's not hard to lose your nerve towards something that, in theory, is a good thing. I think what Eduardo said is a good comment for critical(cynical) people like myself to listen to - that

"While I think it's easy to critique them by saying that they could do a much better job than this at being green, when I really think about it, can't we all? I suppose a little bit of effort is better than none at all."

It's so easy to see what's wrong with all of these programs (and there is plenty wrong) that the good can go under the radar. There is something to gain from all of these programs; what worries me is that they're being treated as an all-in-one cure to the problem when in reality its one piece of an all encompassing solution that transcends shopping habbits and celebrity endorsements. But it's like Eddy was getting at: a bandaid isn't going to fix a slit artery, but I guess it's better than nothing.

It's hard (for me at least) to not become unfairly jaded towards the 'green' revolution - with so much being shoved down our throats with commercials, advertisements, and the visual shit-splosion when you're trying to buy soap or toilet paper, it's not hard to lose your nerve towards something that, in theory, is a good thing. I think what Eduardo said is a good comment for critical(cynical) people like myself to listen to - that

"While I think it's easy to critique them by saying that they could do a much better job than this at being green, when I really think about it, can't we all? I suppose a little bit of effort is better than none at all."

It's so easy to see what's wrong with all of these programs (and there is plenty wrong) that the good can go under the radar. There is something to gain from all of these programs; what worries me is that they're being treated as an all-in-one cure to the problem when in reality its one piece of an all encompassing solution that transcends shopping habbits and celebrity endorsements. But it's like Eddy was getting at: a bandaid isn't going to fix a slit artery, but I guess it's better than nothing.

The "dumpster chic" for fashion week reminds me of Zoolander! As dumb as that movie is, it is genius and I love it! I think its stellar that something that is so typically "hippie" like dumpster diving made it to fashion week! You wouldn't believe that stuff that people throw away! One of my favorite pair of shoes came from a dumpster and they hadn't even been worn before! Dumpster diving is generally something frowned upon among our society, so I think its really awesome that something that so many people "look up to" like fashion week has embraced the grunge, the reusing, and the dumpster diving! : ) Dive on!

Like Scott (I'm assuming that's you up there Scott) said (twice) about being cynical of the businesses that seem to be exploiting the green revolution, I'm right there with ya buddy. I can't help but to express my jaded opinion of capitalism, particularly when it's masquerading as something "beneficial." Additionally, I think any company making a profit off of something, particularly with claims such as eco-friendliness, they should be held accountable to the fullest degree for making sure they're delivering what they're claiming to deliver.

But I digress.

When I was visiting my father about a year ago he got really excited and told me about this new show on the Discovery Channel (I'm not sure if it's still on or not) called – gag me – Garbage Moguls. Now my skepticism did not keep me from watching all of the episodes I could, mind you. Essentially, the show featured the company TerraCycle that claims to take trash and make it into marketable items. Now there are a few reasons why this company rubbed me the wrong way. First of all, their target clients were companies like notoriously gag inducing Walmart and big box store Office Max – this detail made it obvious how little this company was about spreading eco-consciousness to consumers and how much it was about making a butt ton of money (note: look at the name of the show). Secondly, the CEO of the company, Tom Szaky, who makes it very common knowledge that he graduated from Princeton and started the company at 19, is, and pardon the french here (literally), a douchebag who's only focus is money. Third reason, it didn't seem like most of the waste they were using were coming from collecting garbage at all, in fact, it seemed like they (most certainly) partnered with corporations like Nabisco and collected fully intact, non-defective wrappers. Last but not least, Szaky coined the term (and subsequently called himself) eco-capitalism. If that doesn't send up some red flags, I'm scared for this world.

Now, maybe I can take the perspective of Ed and think they're doing nice in their reach for the top, but I'm just far too skeptical and stubborn for that. Does the eco-capitalism movement translate into fetishized eco-consciousness that will do no long-term good for the environment and society at large? I believe it could be a real threat.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by becke479 published on December 3, 2010 1:30 AM.

Toxicity | Personal | Eduardo Cortes was the previous entry in this blog.

Financial | Affordability | Lindsay Nayes is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Pages

Powered by Movable Type 4.31-en