dufou010: October 2011 Archives

Through the class lectures and videos, and keeping up with the book, I have become interested in the split-brain procedure. The split brain procedure involves severing the corpus callosum and separating the right and left sides of the brain. This procedure was done a long time ago without knowledge of the affects, and it would not be completely in present day solely for research purposes. Roger Sperry

Through the class lectures and videos, and keeping up with the book, I have become interested in the split-brain procedure. The split brain procedure involves severing the corpus callosum and separating the right and left sides of the brain. This procedure was done a long time ago without knowledge of the affects, and it would not be completed in present day solely for research purposes. Split brain surgery is done to cure epilepsy, and is best to be done at an early age, so each part of the brain can accommodate and learn functions of the opposite side.

Roger Sperry did experiments and discovered that the left and right brains do serve specific and different purposes. When the corpus callosum is severed, the two sides are unable to communicate. This was found through the inability for items in the left visual field to be spoken about, because the language center of the brain is on the left side, and the visual fields pair up with the opposite side of the brain. It was also found that our brain recognizes items in both visual fields, but only items on the right can be spoken aloud. We know they are recognized because patients could draw items that were shown on the left side, but they didn't know why they were drawing them. They were unaware that they had recently seen a picture of that item. This article talks about this topic and explains the experiments. (I don't know how to do an actual link, I copied and pasted the url, and that usually creates a hyperlink in other things.)

http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/split-brain/background.html

I think this is a very interesting topic and could correlate with the question of "Are some people left brained or right brained?"

Creating False Memories

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I was inspired, but mostly suggested, to write a blog post about today's discussion section. The topic of discussion today was memory, especially the ability to modify and even create false memories.

In the example of the Paul Ingram case, he was convinced through psychological methods, that he raped and sexually harassed his two daughters. The daughters created stories and told the police, but their stories continued to change and there was no real evidence to support their allegations. Through misinformation and suggestibility techniques, Paul started to believe and even "remember" committing the crime. He felt that he was being possessed by the devil and that there was a dark side of him he was previously unaware of. There were many reasons that it was made possible, and it shows how real and applicable the concept of creating false memories or altering people's memory is. Here's the link to the Paul Ingram case.

https://www2.webvista.umn.edu/webct/cobaltMainFrame.dowebct?appforward=%2Fwebct%2Furw%2Flc2539830691121.tp2539939872061%2FstartFrameSet.dowebct%3Fforward%3DstudentCourseView.dowebct%26amp%3Blcid%3D2539830691121


Today in psych discussion, we did a memory experiment to test the concept of creating false memories. We were orally given lists of words and had to recall as many of them as we could after. The words in each list were related, and most of the class added words associated with the list that were never spoken by Julia. This proves that people can create false memories very easily.

The second link talks about the phenomenon of creating false memories, and also has the exact experiment we did in class. It proves the same results as we encountered in class. I find this to be very interesting, because we don't expect this to be possible. We think our memories are so clear and concise, but they are often inaccurate. I will try to keep that in mind next time I argue with a friend about a past event "i remember like it was yesterday"

http://pages.pomona.edu/~rt004747/lgcs11read/RoedigerMcDermott95.pdf

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