sevol005: October 2011 Archives

Intent vs. Impact

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For anyone who watched the Lions/49ers game last Sunday afternoon, it is clear to see that one's initial intention can be taken the wrong way. Last week, after the 49ers upset the Lions with a victory, the head coach took the walk across the field to do the traditional post game handshake. In all of excitement, the 49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh shook Lions' head coach, Jim Schwartz's hand "too hard." Following the game, Harbaugh admits "Personally I can get better at the post game handshake" (NFL.com). Following the handshake, the two head coaches were involved in an altercation that overshadowed the actual game.

The dispute that took place over the handshake is an example of how one's intent can be interpreted differently depending on the situation. After reading chapter 8, we have all learned how complex language is and how there are many different ways to interpret others' words and actions. Interpretation is made even more unclear with the amount of technology surrounding us. Facebook, texting, emailing, etc. present even more difficulties in realizing one's intention because we do not hear the person's tone. For example, one could wrongly interpret a friend's text if that text has only periods, or a brief answer. The person receiving the text may believe that their friend is mad without knowing why, which could lead to hurt feelings.

So the next time someone steps on your toe, spills your drink, or in the case of Jim Schwartz, shakes your hand too hard, don't fret about it. Although the impact may come off as intentional, you don't actually know the thinking behind that person.

Intent vs. Impact

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Vote 0 Votes

For anyone who watched the Lions/49ers game last Sunday afternoon, it is clear to see that one's initial intention can be taken the wrong way. Last week, after the 49ers upset the Lions with a victory, the head coach took the walk across the field to do the traditional post game handshake. In all of excitement, the 49ers head coach Jim Harbaugh shook Lions' head coach, Jim Schwartz's hand "too hard." Following the game, Harbaugh admits "Personally I can get better at the post game handshake" (NFL.com). Following the handshake, the two head coaches were involved in an altercation that overshadowed the actual game.

The dispute that took place over the handshake is an example of how one's intent can be interpreted differently depending on the situation. After reading chapter 8, we have all learned how complex language is and how there are many different ways to interpret others' words and actions. Interpretation is made even more unclear with the amount of technology surrounding us. Facebook, texting, emailing, etc. present even more difficulties in realizing one's intention because we do not hear the person's tone. For example, one could wrongly interpret a friend's text if that text has only periods, or a brief answer. The person receiving the text may believe that their friend is mad without knowing why, which could lead to hurt feelings.

So the next time someone steps on your toe, spills your drink, or in the case of Jim Schwartz, shakes your hand too hard, don't fret about it. Although the impact may come off as intentional, you don't actually know the thinking behind that person.

In order to increase performance in our high school this past year, the school decided to push back the starting time one full hour. Of course as high school students, the students were excited about one more hour of sleep. But after some research, I learned that my former high school was not the only one introducing this new starting time. According to Valerie Strauss, writer for the Washington Post, Minnesota's Edina High School changed the school's starting time in 1996 for 3,000 high school students from 7:25 to 8:30. And just two years after, other high schools followed suit for more than 50,000 students. Valerie Strauss writes: "Teachers reported that students were more alert, and research conducted by Wahlstrom showed a range of benefits to students and teachers -- and contradicted some of the biggest fears about the change..."
Sleep.jpgAfter being a part of this starting time change, I would suggest any high school superintendent to take part in it. The majority of high school students split their time between school, sports, and their jobs-all major factors of sleep deprivation. Also, Researchers found that high levels of melatonin, a sleep promoting drug, affect teenagers later at night than it does for either children or adults. Which means, even if a high school wants to make it to bed early, some times it is physically impossible for her to do so.

href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/09/AR2006010901561.html">

Last year in my high school psychology class, we were discussing the extent of Nature vs. Nurture. After much discussion, my teacher introduced us to a man who was greatly involved in the debate; however, he wasn't a scientist and he didn't choose to be apart of the experiments. After some difficulties at a young age, Bruce Reimer and his twin brother were brought into the hospital to undergo circumcision. Unfortunately, doctors used a different method involving lasers and Bruce's penis was burned beyond surgical repair.
reimer2.jpgA renown doctor had been studying the extent of Nature vs. Nurture and suggested that the Reimer family raise the boy as a little girl. The family had come to terms that "he was a beautiful little girl" (CBS News). They changed his name to Brenda and gave him the life of a little girl. But once Brenda reached puberty, she became rebellious and stopped taking her hormone pills and they were unable to hide the truth any longer. After being told by his father, Brenda changed his name to David and underwent surgeries to fully become a man.1783_fs.jpg
I have always found the nature vs. nurture debate really interesting and after reading this story, I never realized how much not being able to be who you are affects you. The Reimer Family is a perfect example of how much our genes and environments factor into who we are to become. At the time of the accident, technology was not advanced enough to correct the incident immediately. Today, hormonal treatments are much more effective and doctors are more aware of the effects of our genes and environment. Another reason that David's initial sex change may have failed is the affect of having a twin brother to look to, and also having a mother who was not involved in wearing makeup, and dressing nicely.
The Reimer brothers' lives were a lie. After going public on Oprah about their story, both brothers committed suicide in their late thirties.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/reimer/

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