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Circadian rhythem

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sleep disorder image.jpg Dawit Wage
Psychology writing #2
Date - 10/8/11
Circadian rhythm is the internal biological clock that regulates approximately 24 hours cycle of biological processes. It is monitored by the hormone melatonin which is secreted by the pineal gland in the brain. It is so incredible how this small tissue has a significant role in our body system. It is stimulated by external cues such as sunlight and temperature. Circadian rhythm is important in determining the sleeping pattern of human being. Could you imagine that what happen to our sleeping pattern if the circadian rhythm is not performing its function at all? I guess, we sleep all 24 hours a day without conscious awareness of our environment. We do not able to focus in our daily activities and we remain unconscious forever. What about for those who lost circadian rhythm due to Brain injuries or diseases? Do they have other mechanism to accomplish their daily activities or they just simple set up an alarm every day. I am just wondering what happen to them; do they stay conscious and be able to perform the physiological activities without the biological clock? What do you think? People with circadian sleep disorder unable to sleep and wake up at the time required for normal work, school, and social needs. We need to get enough sleep in order make our biological clock work properly so that we are able to accomplish the physiological activities in a time manner.so if we have such a dynamic tissue in our brain why we need an artificial alarm today? We do not need to spend our money for nothing. What we do is just get enough sleep and make our circadian rhythm work well.

Source - www.sciencedaily.com



OBE's

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Out-of-Body experiences have surprisingly happened to many people. An out-of-body experience is when a person senses their consciousness leaving their body.
Many people describe them to happen when they are under an incredible amount of stress. Such as in the textbook, the example used is about a female police officer on the first day of her job. As she was apprehending a criminal she felt as though she was watching the entire episode from above the actual scene. OBE.png That leads me to question if what they are experiencing is actually happening or if it just seems like it. Our bodies react to things in astonishing ways so part of me definitely believes this is possible, however; I am skeptical at the same time. This type of experience seems to be similar to how the brain fills in information in different situations. For example when your brain fills in a pattern of a picture that is not really there. Numerous studies have been performed to try and replicate an out-of-body experience. In these studies, researches project an image of the subject about six feet in front of themselves. The subjects wore virtual reality goggles that allowed them to see the back of themselves. They then perform touch tests on the subjects, for example, stroking their back with a stick. When the strokes of both the subject and the projected image were synchronized, the subject reported feeling a sense of being inside the image of them. This information was found from an article about out-of-body experiences in the New York Times; http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/23/science/23cnd-body.html. There are many different claims about these experiences and we may never know if it is true or not, but it certainly is interesting to think about!
Here is another article from the New York Times concerning out-of-body experiences: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/03/health/psychology/03shad.html?pagewanted=all

The Razor and the Spaceship

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In the year 1969, on July 20, Neil Armstrong took his first step onto the moon. He looked at that first step he took, than turned to the camera and spoke the famous words, "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind." Audiences were enthralled with what they were seeing, a man was walking on the moon! Yet even with video footage of the event and public knowledge of the space program there were those who doubted that Neil Armstrong had actually landed on the moon. They claimed it was an elaborate hoax to try and look better than the U.S.S.R. rather than an actual amazing feat of science and engineering. If they had known the scientific method perhaps they wouldn't have reached such a radical and wrong conclusion about what they were seeing. Occam's Razor is the key. Occam's Razor states that if two hypothesis' fit the data equally well than the simpler or parsimonious one is most likely the answer. In this case The simpler answer is that NASA had indeed performed an amazing feat of engineering rather than government conspiracies, coverups, and power play. While this doesn't necessarily prove that a space shuttle had landed on the moon it does give us an easier hypothesis to test first. The evidence for the shuttle landing is overwhelming and easily falsiable which further strengthens it's claim. On the other hand, although the conspiracy theory does explain and account for the phenomena it is neither falsifiable nor replicable which makes it violate more principles of the scientific method. In this case, Occam's Razor shaved off excess detail to give a straight forward answer which later can be tested to find out for sure if the hypothesis was correct or not. Parsimony is a wonderful concept as it closes the door on cluttering and overcomplicated ideas. Could you even imagine life if every idea we tried to prove was as complicated as a conspiracy theory?neil_armstrong_auf_dem_mond.jpg

Creating False Memories

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I was inspired, but mostly suggested, to write a blog post about today's discussion section. The topic of discussion today was memory, especially the ability to modify and even create false memories.

In the example of the Paul Ingram case, he was convinced through psychological methods, that he raped and sexually harassed his two daughters. The daughters created stories and told the police, but their stories continued to change and there was no real evidence to support their allegations. Through misinformation and suggestibility techniques, Paul started to believe and even "remember" committing the crime. He felt that he was being possessed by the devil and that there was a dark side of him he was previously unaware of. There were many reasons that it was made possible, and it shows how real and applicable the concept of creating false memories or altering people's memory is. Here's the link to the Paul Ingram case.

https://www2.webvista.umn.edu/webct/cobaltMainFrame.dowebct?appforward=%2Fwebct%2Furw%2Flc2539830691121.tp2539939872061%2FstartFrameSet.dowebct%3Fforward%3DstudentCourseView.dowebct%26amp%3Blcid%3D2539830691121


Today in psych discussion, we did a memory experiment to test the concept of creating false memories. We were orally given lists of words and had to recall as many of them as we could after. The words in each list were related, and most of the class added words associated with the list that were never spoken by Julia. This proves that people can create false memories very easily.

The second link talks about the phenomenon of creating false memories, and also has the exact experiment we did in class. It proves the same results as we encountered in class. I find this to be very interesting, because we don't expect this to be possible. We think our memories are so clear and concise, but they are often inaccurate. I will try to keep that in mind next time I argue with a friend about a past event "i remember like it was yesterday"

http://pages.pomona.edu/~rt004747/lgcs11read/RoedigerMcDermott95.pdf

Link

There is no true clear cut between fact and fiction when it comes to hypnosis, and whether or not it is the only hypothesis. One good thing that hypnosis has been proven helpful for is the removal of habit disorders. In this Youtube video, Denise Richards visits a famous hypnotist, Kevin Stone, wishing to fix her cussing problem. He has Denise close her eyes and visualize herself controlling her cussing. Her tells her to picture herself in an out of body sort of way, and has her visualize herself carrying on the same conversations without the cuss words. When Denise awakens she's hopeful that this technique works and expresses that she feels very relaxed.

Hypnosis is defined as a set of techniques that provides people with suggestions for alterations in their perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. This is exactly what Kevin Stone performs on Denise. I'm hesitant to use the word performs though because the way the definition phrases hypnosis as a "set of techniques" makes me feel as if Stone simply told Denise an idea of how to fix her cussing habit. The idea of hypnosis, especially in Denise's case, makes me question the scientific principle of ruling out rival hypotheses. Can the resolution to Denise's cussing problem be solved via a different solution? It doesn't seem likely that the only way to stop her from cussing is to put her in a trance like state and tell her the same things you could tell her while she is wide awake.

my mother forgot me!!

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PSYW2Sissi.jpg
Are there any old people which were rational and smart before but now are starting to forgetfulness 、 restless 、 emotional and language expression is difficult, even forget the way home or forget his family member? !!!!!
If have, so they may They might get alzheimer's disease.Zhang Li, an 82 years old women who are Living in Beijing, China, and have the disease. she started forgetful and also always crying and angry. However, these has not aroused the attention of the family until she got lost in the way to home which she walked before.Let her daughter shocked that she didn't even know who is that when her daughter went to police station to pick up her
This pathological will lead to the cerebral cortex atrophy, and accompanied by beta amyloid/beta AP deposition, neurons fiber tangles (neurofibrillarytangles, NFT), a lot of memory, and to reduce the number of neurons senile plaques (senileplaque, SP) formation.PSYW3Sissi.jpg
Chinese people net survey found twenty percent of north China 80 years old man with alzheimer's disease, and the age of the patients in the shrinking. And this kind of disease is almost impossible to cure. So if your side of the older memory and mood problems, please take him to the hospital!

Flashes of Light When Blind

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http://www.snopes.com/science/atombomb.asp

According to the website above, on July 16th, 1945 an atomic bomb went off at a testing site in Socorro, New Mexico. About 50 miles away from the testing site, eighteen-year-old Georgia Green was riding in the car on a highway and saw a flash of light at about the same time the bomb went off. This wouldn't be so fascinating if Georgia Green hadn't been blind. How could it be that she saw the flash of light when she was legally blind in both eyes? Well maybe she didn't. This is an example of correlation vs. causation. Did the atomic bomb really cause Georgia Green to see a flash of light or are the uncorrelated? The flash of light could have been caused by something completely unrelated. It's hard to say and it's impossible to test because it was such a brief moment and you cant go back in her memory to test what caused her to see this flash, but it is curious that both these events happened at almost the same time. Another type of scientific thinking this should bring up is Occam's Razor. Is there a simpler explanation that works just as well? For example, blind people have been known to see random flashes of light that have nothing to do with anything going on around them. Similar to the brief flash of light you might remember seeing if you hit your head really hard. Maybe the fact that Georgia Green saw this flash of light near the time the bomb went off is a coincidence, and it is a more probable explanation.

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In Lecture, we learned about Pavlov's Classical Conditioning. There are four parts to this; unconditioned stimulus, unconditioned response, conditioned stimulus, and conditioned response. The unconditioned stimulus can be something like food for example. The unconditioned response is how a person responds to the unconditioned stimulus. In class, we learned an example of this may be a dog salivating around food. The conditioned stimulus is something that is present every time the dog eats, like a sound made right before his food is served. The condition response is his response to the sound made; he salivates. Since he always hears the sound before he eats, he knows food is coming by the sound. The thought of the food causes him to salivate.
I went to camp one year, and before every meal a bell would ring. The bell always made me hungry, because I knew food was coming. Eventually, the bell started being used for other things, like when free time began or when we had a meeting. At first, I would always feel hungry and expect to eat. After a while, I grew accustomed to the bell being used for different things and no longer felt hunger after every ring.
We become familiar with certain sounds at certain points in are day. We begin to associate them with things like food or people. Classical conditioning is all about how we respond to our environment. It is natural to respond to food by salivating. The reason the dog salivated when he heard the metronome was because he associated it with the food. Just like he grew accustomed to the sound coming before a meal, when the meal stopped coming after the sound he eventually became accustomed to that too. So, if we associate something with something else, but they no longer are together, we can just as easily unassociated them.

http://psychology.about.com/od/behavioralpsychology/a/classcond.htm

Circadian rhythem

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Dawit Wage Psychology writing #2
Date - 10/8/11
Circadian rhythm is the internal biological clock that regulates approximately 24 hours cycle of biological processes. It is monitored by the hormone melatonin which is secreted by the pineal gland in the brain. It is so incredible how this small tissue has a significant role in our body system. It is stimulated by external cues such as sunlight and temperature. Circadian rhythm is important in determining the sleeping pattern of human being. Could you imagine that what happen to our sleeping pattern if the circadian rhythm is not performing its function at all? I guess, we sleep all 24 hours a day without conscious awareness of our environment. We do not able to focus in our daily activities and we remain unconscious forever. What about for those who lost circadian rhythm due to Brain injuries or diseases? Do they have other mechanism to accomplish their daily activities or they just simple set up an alarm every day. I am just wondering what happen to them; do they stay conscious and be able to perform the physiological activities without the biological clock? What do you think? People with circadian sleep disorder unable to sleep and wake up at the time required for normal work, school, and social needs. We need to get enough sleep in order make our biological clock work properly so that we are able to accomplish the physiological activities in a time manner.so if we have such a dynamic tissue in our brain why we need an artificial alarm today? We do not need to spend our money for nothing. What we do is just get enough sleep and make our circadian rhythm work well.

Source - www.sciencedaily.com sleep disorder image.jpg



Freud's dream protection theory states many things about dreams such as fulfillment theories, wish fulfillment, and dreams being the protectors of sleep. But are these theories correct? Have these claims been disproved? The answer is yes, and they are false or are only closely true to what they're trying to interpret. Despite the validity of this theory, it is important because dreams have a lot to do with our daily lives. And by that, I mean that most people interpret their dreams without thinking scientifically. That's important because it can lead people to believe that their dreams have meaningful relations to their life. It's not true that it doesn't have any meaning at all, it's just that scientific evidence, and biological psychology studies ( such as activation-synthesis theory), has proved to show that most dreams don't depict hidden messages, but very obvious messages. If we take a look at this video, at the end of it is a man who says he saw a dream about a bloody man running through the church where him and his mom were at the time. He woke up and 5 days later his mother died.

Can we say that this had to be because he dreamed of a bloody man? What does the bloody man have to do with his mom dying? We have to think of the scientific principle " Correlation Vs. Causation". We can think of many instances where we had people being involved in a scary dream, and there are many people who die. We can think of it more like a coincidence. This is important to think about, because things like this can factor in everyone's life, and can affect it drastically. To think scientifically about it, we can avoid ignorant decisions that we make, and we can think about things that actually make sense. If we don't, we might just end up believing the wrong things that can dramatically alter our lives ( such as having a dreams that can bias our decisions and have a negative effect in our lives).
Lucid-Dreaming-3.jpg
This picture symbolizes Lucid dreaming. I find this interesting, because I was unable to find articles or research that relates Lucid dreaming to dream protection theory. It makes me question if our dreams actually do have meaning if we lucid dream. Or if our decisions that we make while lucid dreaming depict our personality, daily decisions, life choices, etc... because that would mean we actually do have control of our dreams, and that what we do could effect our real life decisions, despite it being a dream ( because you can control a dream while lucid dreaming).

Sources: Lillenfield text Psych 1001

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=lucid+dreaming&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1600&bih=770&tbm=isch&tbnid=uYgnm532B7AFVM:&imgrefurl=http://schoolworkhelper.net/2011/06/lucid-dreaming-causes-inducing-types/&docid=fzpRoa2ojckP-M&w=600&h=489&ei=0gOVTqC9COWNsQL-rpTvAQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=173&vpy=310&dur=1502&hovh=203&hovw=249&tx=79&ty=144&page=1&tbnh=126&tbnw=154&start=0&ndsp=36&ved=1t:429,r:9,s:0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWMEnkyL_qA&feature=related

http://www.here-be-dreams.com/psychology/freud.html

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