Virtual Aggression

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In the past decade children's aggressive behavior has been directly correlated to violent video games, and some show no correlation at all. There are many other factors that play a role in why children's behavior is aggressive even if they play a substantial amount of violent video games. According to Dr. Christopher Ferguson from Texas A&M, factors such as negative relationships with parents, antisocial personality, and delinquent peers can affect a child's behavior towards others. Findings show violence video games will not have a long-term, but short-term, affect on one's behavior. The video games introduced in today's era are much different than what it was 25 plus years ago. As Pong and Pac-Man did not have any affect on the aggression of children's behavior, Call of Duty and Grand Theft Auto might. Or do they? Patrick Kierkegaard from the University of Essex in England states, "There is no obvious link between real-world violence statistics and the advent of video games." You might be saying to yourself how this is not possible, but it is! This is going to be hard to believe, but with violent video game sales skyrocketing since the 1990's, violent crime has surprising decreased. It is still hard to conquer what the real cause and effect of violent video games on children is, but both sides of the argument has great supporting evidence for their given reasons. Grand_Theft_Auto_IV_cover.jpg

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There seems to be a lot of contradicting evidence in this debate. Some studies I've seen claim a clear correlation between violent video games and aggression while others seem to show no link at all. I think it will probably be a while before this argument is settled.

This is a subject where there isn't really a clear conclusion. There are so many reasons why you could argue children grow up being violent. There isn't really a concrete way to prove that violent video games is the cause of child violence.

This topic is interesting. It seems that the arguments on the effects of violence in video games are based more on opinions than facts. If violent video games increase violent behavior in children, why has violent crime been decreasing since the 1990's? More longitudinal studies should be conducted to further research this subject.

This topic is interesting. It seems that the arguments on the effects of violence in video games are based more on opinions than facts. If violent video games increase violent behavior in children, why has violent crime been decreasing since the 1990's? More longitudinal studies should be conducted to further research this subject.

This topic is interesting because many parents may look at this topic and use it as a reason to not allow their children to play violent games. It is also interesting that you said that violent crimes have been decreasing since the 1990's because the graphics in video games have only improved making many games even more gory and violent. I think when parents look at this argument they should look more at desensitizing their child to violence rather than creating violent ideas.

I think this provides a great opportunity to look for a correlation versus causation argument. As you pointed out in your blog, crime rates have decreased since the advent of violent video games, raising the question of if there is even a correlation with violence and video games. Overall I do think that video games do need to be discussed with small children, much as parents have to filter television and videos that their children watch.

Careful... just because there are other things that cause violence in children does not mean that video games do not cause violence. Couldn't it also be that violent crime has gone down but that other measures of violence (perhaps bullying or peer aggression) have actually increased? What new insight can you provide on this topic?

I am not going to disagree that there is a correlation between violent video games and aggression. But let's not all jump to conclusions and ignore the causation vs correlation principle. Maybe aggressive people are just more susceptible to playing violent video games. Similarly to depressed kids are more likely to listen to Marylin Manson than Jack Johnson.

From my experience, I do not think that there is an relationship between them. When I was young, I had played Call of Duty and Grand Theft Auto a lot. However, even though sometimes I wanted crush something in my real world, my conscious brain reminded me that virtual world in game is totally different from the real world.

I don't really think there's a correlation between them. I think that violent video games have a greater effect of desensitizing violence rather than encouraging violent behavior. Additionally, there isn't much factual evidence to support these arguments. I feel that most people understand that violence in video games isn't acceptable in real life.

I think the correlation depends on the people. People who do not know what is wrong and what is right will think that being violent is okay. However, people who knows what is right and what is wrong will know that violence is bad. So I think parents should guide their children well that violence is bad in real life.

As you discussed, there seems to be a lot of conflicting evidence on the topic of violent video games. Because of this it's hard to know for sure what the effects are, but I think video games are often used as a scapegoat for bad parenting. Ultimately, the decision of a kid to play these violent games rests on the parents who buy the games for the kids.

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This page contains a single entry by stieb013 published on March 28, 2012 1:36 PM.

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