Scientific thinking

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We learned about quite a few different topics this semester. However, from attraction to abnormal psychology, the one thing that remained constant was the use of scientific thinking. The six principles of ruling of rival hypotheses, correlation vs. causation, falsifiability, replicability, extraordinary claims and Occam's razor guided our exploration of each topic. I think these are ideas that can help you evaluate claims and situations throughout your life and this is why the book and lectures made a point of trying to ingrain them in us. We're learned a lot about how easy it is to unknowingly bias our opinions through things like the confirmation bias or availability heuristic, some examples of which are shown here. We also learned how to avoid these types of things through scientific thinking and in 5 years I hope I am still actively challenging my ideas and opinions through these methods. 285px-Mr_Pipo_Think_03_svg.png

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Are there any ways that you think that you can specifically apply these ways of thinking? How might they help you in everyday life?

Interesting article, I think one of the main things that I'll take with me from both this class and college in general is that there is never an answer that is right all of the time or a simple explanation for everything. Another important concept I've learned is that there are always two sides to every issue. Someone is usually never 100% right or wrong.

I think that this is a good thing to be brought up regarding this course. Like you said, these things have been brought up in every chapter that we've looked at and in all the quizzes and exams. I think it's something that they really want us to get out of this course and speaking for most people, I think that by now we have a really good understanding of these principles. I found them very challenging at first but I now have a very good understanding of each of the six and I plan on using them whenever needed in future courses where I need to evaluate information.

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This page contains a single entry by wils1587 published on April 27, 2012 12:39 PM.

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