Conditions of Worth

user-pic
Vote 0 Votes

Conditions of worth are discussed in Chapter 14 of our textbook, which covers personality. This concept was developed by Carl Rogers, a theorist who follows the humanistic model of personality. Rogers defines conditions of worth as rules we make for ourselves to distinguish correct and incorrect behaviors. We tend to create these conditions in childhood and continue to follow them as we grow older. The behaviors we engage in are based off of how others view our decisions. If we are made fun of for doing something, we don't feel worthy and therefore are less likely to continue that behavior. If we are praised or acknowledged in a positive way as a result of another behavior, we do feel worthy and are more likely to continue that behavior. I have definitely developed conditions of worth in my life, as have everybody else. I would much prefer to feel socially accepted and viewed as a generally good person than to be judged and looked at as weird and an awkward person based on how I act. However, I do feel as though since I have gotten older, I don't care as much about what others think of my behaviors. I don't take it too personally anymore when somebody makes fun of me for something I like to do that may be odd. I would be interested in learning whether or not conditions of worth decrease as we age and become more comfortable with who we are as people. I believe that this concept is beneficial to understand the reasoning behind why people behave the way they do and all of the factors that contribute to our personalities.
kids-coloring-424.jpg

2 Comments

| Leave a comment

Good ideas about change over time. Is there information on this topic on the internet? It might be helpful to connect to outside resources.

Good ideas about change over time. Is there information on this topic on the internet? It might be helpful to connect to outside resources.

Leave a comment

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by hysju014 published on November 20, 2011 4:07 PM.

Walking Through a Doorway Wipes Out Memory was the previous entry in this blog.

Understanding Emotions Without Language is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.