Digital

Stop me if you've heard this one.

So the infinite monkeys that have been working on the next version of Windows walk into a bar. The first one in line says, "Hey, give me a banana martini," and the barkeep goes to make one. Before he's even finished making that one, the second one says, "I'm watching my intake, I'll have half what he's having." Right behind that monkey, the next one says, "Same here, I'll have half what the second fellow is having." The bartender pauses to take in the infinite line stretching out the door, says "To heck with this," and puts two martinis on the bar.

I spent a chunk of this week re-learning various interesting things about digital signal processing, which (naturally) can be done quite conveniently in python these days. (Don't worry, I'll resist the urge to write import skynet in any programs.) In theory, if you type import scipy you can make python do anything Matlab can. While I'm still fundamentally suspicious of syntactically significant whitespace -- although I'm not about to revive that particular Great Internet Debate -- python has actually edged out perl as my go-to high level language of choice these days. The only excuse I have left to muck around in perl these days is maintaining PageCaptain, and to be honest, I've been severely delinquent on that front this year anyway.

Speaking of things digital, now that February 18th has passed, the great digital TV transition is underway. As one of the 15% or so of households still using over-the-air broadcast television, this has been of great interest to the roomies. While our rabbit ears pull in all but the two weakest stations reasonably well, the more couch-spud inclined of them have been agitating for an antenna upgrade. I might build one of these in that case. The Gray-Hoverman antenna is a nice example of Moore's Law enabling ever larger groups of people to do stuff that was the province of professionals until quite recently, in this case, design and optimize high-gain antennas. Back when the ham radio operators did this sort of thing on a regular basis, antenna tuning was considered among the highest of black arts.

Okay, that's enough of that. I'll leave you with a video that Elena showed me recently:


Music video to Schweine by Glukoza Nostra, from youtube

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This page contains a single entry by Milligan published on February 19, 2009 10:34 PM.

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