Frozen Dainties

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frozendaintiescover.jpg Do you dream of wandering through a forest where bowls of ice cream sprout up from the ground, and metallic mountains glimmer in the distance? If so, you should try some White Mountain ice cream. The White Mountain Freezer Co. of Nashua, N.H. published Frozen Dainties in the early 1900's to promote their ice cream freezer. The writers of this pamphlet take their ice cream very seriously, as well as their sherbets, water ices, and frozen beverages. They also make sure to put in a plug for their ice cream and/or freezer on every page, such as "The White Mountain Freezer is one of the great conveniences of advanced civilization and has come to be a necessity in the modern home" and "Nothing so refreshing to brain and brawn of the business man, the farmer, the mechanic, the working man, as White Mountain Ice-Cream." Here is there recipe for plain ice-cream, although I can't promise that it will be true White Mountain Ice-Cream if you can't get your hands on one of these crank freezers:

frozendaintiesbucket.jpg
Plain Ice-Cream
From Frozen Dainties by The White Mountain Freezer Co., 19--

Ingredients
1 Pt. Milk
1 Cup Sugar
2 Scant Tablespoonfuls Flour
1 Pt. Cream
2 Eggs
1 Saltspoonful Salt [note: I believe 1 saltspoonful = 1/4 tsp]
2 Tablespoonfuls Flavoring

Boil the milk and cream, reserving a quarter of a cup of milk. Mix the sugar, flour and salt thoroughly. Beat the eggs till light, add the cold milk and the sugar mixture, and when well mixed add the boiling milk. Turn back into the double boiler and cook twenty minutes. Stir constantly till smooth, and after that occasionally. Strain through a gravy strainer, add more sugar if needed, and when cold, add the flavoring. Freeze as usual. This is a good foundation for an inexpensive ice cream, and if a larger quantity be desired, more cream and sugar may be added with the flavoring. If the milk be boiling when the flour is added, and cooked thoroughly, there will be no taste of the flour. If you have no cream, use all milk, four eggs, and add one rounding tablespoonful of butter when you take the thickened milk from the fire.

1 Comment

http://www.whitemountain-outlet.com/about-makers.htm

This is so cool! You can still buy them!

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