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In Memoriam: Spring 2007

HOVALD (BUZZ) HELSETH Jr., M.D., Class of 1960, Minnetonka, Minnesota, died January 3 at age 72. Dr. Helseth was a cardiovascular surgeon in the Twin Cities for 30 years, serving as senior partner in cardiac surgery at Methodist Hospital and chief of cardiac surgery at the Hennepin County Medical Center. He was also a chief architect of the pediatric cardiac surgery program at Minneapolis Children’s Hospitals and Clinics. During his career, Dr. Helseth was known as a pioneering surgeon willing to try new procedures. He was among the first in the Midwest to try the “Norwood procedure” to surgically treat hypoplastic left heart syndrome. If not treated during the first two weeks of life, the heart defect is typically fatal.

Dr. Helseth is survived by his wife, Betty, four children, and ten grandchildren.


MANCEL T. MITCHELL, M.D., Class of 1934, Edina, Minnesota, died February 21 at age 95. After earning his bachelor’s and M.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota, Dr. Mitchell served as a consultant for the Children’s Bureau of the United States Public Health Service in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. He was also a flight surgeon for the army during World War II. Dr. Mitchell went on to practice obstetrics and gynecology in the Minneapolis area for more than 30 years, many of which he spent as chief of the obstetrics and gynecology staff at Minneapolis General Hospital, precursor to the Hennepin County Medical Center. He was also a member of the clinical faculty of the University of Minnesota Medical School, president of the Minneapolis War Memorial Blood Bank, and volunteer physician in Ecuador on the world’s first peacetime hospital ship, Project HOPE (Health Opportunities for People Everywhere).

He was preceded in death by his wife, Harriet, and is survived by his four children, ten grandchildren, and six grandchildren.


FRANKLIN C. ANDERSON, M.D., Class of 1942, Owatonna, Minnesota, died February 2 at age 89. After receiving his bachelor’s and M.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota, he moved to Owatonna in 1949. There, he and a friend established a partnership that later evolved into the Owatonna Clinic, a 50-doctor, multispecialty organization. He also served as the first medical director of the Federated Mutual Life Insurance Company for 33 years and as a fellow and diplomat of the American Board of Family Practice. Dr. Anderson is survived by his wife, Sophie, five children, eleven grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.


JOHN W. ANDERSON, M.D., Class of 1951, Blue Earth, Minnesota, died January 22 at age 85. Dr. Anderson was an innovator in rural health care and education and a family practitioner in Blue Earth and throughout Minnesota. He was also active in community affairs and conservation, and wrote numerous articles for Minnesota Medicine and Minnesota Waterfowler. In recognition of his service and accomplishments, the University of Minnesota Medical Alumni Society awarded him its highest honor, the Harold S. Diehl Award, in 1984.


SOLVEIG M. BERGH, M.D., Class of 1938, Minneapolis, died December 6, 2006, at age 95. Dr. Bergh practiced radiology for many years and worked closely with her late brother and surgeon, Dr. George S. Bergh Sr. She was preceded in death by her brother and two nieces and is survived by one niece, one nephew, four grand-nieces and nephews, and six great-grand nieces and nephews.


CARL R. HEINZERLING, M.D., Class of 1953, Sarasota, Florida, died September 18, 2006, at age 79. Dr. Heinzerling specialized in both emergency and family medicine. He was also a veteran of World War II. He is survived by his wife, Patricia, four children, and six grandchildren.


CORRIN H. HODGSON, M.D., Class of 1932, Rochester, Minnesota, died February 25 at age 98. Early in his career, Dr. Hodgson practiced medicine in Peru for five years. Upon his return to Minnesota, he was hired by the Mayo Clinic and taught at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. He continued his international work by serving as a special medical emissary on a congressional tour of Africa and was appointed to the Honorary Peruvian Consul in Rochester by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He also served on the boards of several organizations, including the Minnesota Medical Foundation. Dr. Hodgson was preceded in death by his wife, Florence. He is survived by his three children, six grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.


ROLAND K. IVERSON, M.D., Class of 1940, Yuba City, California, died January 20 at age 94. Dr. Iverson practiced surgery for more than 35 years. He also served in the U.S. Public Health Service for 14 years and was a volunteer medical aide to volunteer physicians in Vietnam, Tunisia, and Haiti. Dr. Iverson was preceded in death by his first wife, Yvonne. He is survived by his second wife, Helen, two children, four stepchildren, fourteen grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.


C. LAURENCE JOHNSON, M.D., Class of 1943, Kansas City, Kansas, died September 29, 2006, at age 90. After receiving his bachelor’s and M.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota, Dr. Johnson served in the navy during World War II. Following his return to the United States, he entered a preceptorship program in urology and, ultimately, continued in private practice until 1991. He was a member of the Metropolitan Medical Society, Missouri State Medical Association, and the South Central Section of the American Urological Association. Dr. Johnson is survived by his wife, Betty, three children, and two grandchildren.


AARON B. LERNER, M.D., Ph.D., Class of 1945, Woodbridge, Connecticut, died February 3 at age 86. Dr. Lerner, who also received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Minnesota, was a member of the faculty of the Yale University School of Medicine and chair of its Department of Dermatology for nearly 30 years. A dermatologist with expertise in skin pigmentation disorders, he is well-known for leading the team of Yale University researchers that discovered melatonin. Dr. Lerner is survived by his wife, Mildred, four children, and nine grandchildren.


WINSTON R. LINDBERG, M.D., Class of 1946, Wayzata, Minnesota, died February 4 at age 84. Dr. Lindberg earned his bachelor’s and M.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota. He served as a ship doctor during World War II and practiced ophthalmology in Minneapolis. He also was an adjunct professor of ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota, a charter member of the Minneapolis Ophthalmological Society, president of the Minnesota Chapter of the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, and a member of the University of Minnesota Vision Foundation’s board of directors. Dr. Lindberg was preceded in death by his wife, Larey. He is survived by one child and three grandchildren.


CARRELL A. PETERSON, M.D., Class of 1943, Piedmont, California, died January 13 at age 91. After earning his bachelor’s and M.D. degrees from University of Minnesota, Dr. Peterson served as a medical officer for the navy during World War II. He went on to become chief of radiology and president of the medical staff at the Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Oakland, California. In addition, he was a member of the diagnostic radiology staff and president of the medical staff at Samuel Merritt Hospital, also in Oakland. Dr. Peterson was known for his early research on the identification of battered child syndrome through X-ray techniques. He was also active in mammography studies as chief radiologist for the Breast Screening Center of Northern California. He is survived by his wife, Deirdrellen, four children, and fourteen grandchildren.


PAT ROLLINS, M.D., Class of 1950, Sebastopol, California, died December 13, 2006, at age 86. Dr. Rollins served in the navy during World War II. A general practitioner, he ran his father’s practice in St. Charles, Minnesota, for five years; practiced in Deephaven, Minnesota, for 21 years; and served as an air force doctor for three years. He is survived by his wife, Margaret, and one child.


HOWARD D. ROSS, M.D., Class of 1954, Los Angeles, California, died December 27, 2006, at age 78. Dr. Ross specialized in psychiatry.


GEORGE N. RYSGAARD, M.D., Class of 1950, Northfield, Minnesota, died December 25, 2006, at age 89. Prior to entering medical school, Dr. Rysgaard conducted ornithological research and helped establish the Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union. He also served in the army for five years during World War II. After receiving his M.D. degree and completing his internship at the University of Minnesota, he was a family physician in Northfield, Minnesota, for 31 years. Dr. Rysgaard was preceded in death by his wife, Frances, and is survived by two children, four grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.


DUANE S. SMITH, M.D., Class of 1954, San Clemente, California, died June 19, 2006, at age 77. In addition to earning his M.D. degree, Dr. Smith completed his residency and internship at the University of Minnesota. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn, two children, and five grandchildren.


JOHN R. TEGGATZ, M.D., Class of 1981, Brown Deer, Wisconsin, died October 15, 2006, at age 58. Dr. Teggatz specialized in pathology. He is survived by his partner, Adan Burnett, three children, and former wife, Virginia Teggatz.


LEONARD B. TORKELSON, M.D., Class of 1952, Baldwin, Wisconsin, died October 21, 2006, at age 83. Dr. Torkelson was a physician and surgeon for 33 years. He is survived by his wife, Elaine, and four children.


JAMES D. WOLFF, M.D., Class of 1987, Fort Dodge, Iowa, died December 4, 2006, at age 54. Dr. Wolff served as a medical officer in the U.S. army and practiced orthopaedic surgery in Fort Dodge. He was also a member of the Masons and the Shriners. He is survived by his wife, Darlene, four children, and one grandchild.


MERRILL B. YEOMANS, M.D., Class of 1951, Shelby, North Carolina, died July 5, 2006, at age 86.


DONALD E. ZIMMERMAN, M.D., Class of 1967, Arvada, Colorado, died June 11, 2006, at age 75. He practiced medicine for a short time in Minneapolis and, after moving to Colorado in 1969, practiced in both Westminster and Arvada. He is survived by his wife, Jeannine, two children, and two grandchildren.

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