University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota Foundation
http://www.give.umn.edu/
612-624-3333
Giving to medicine and health at the University of Minnesota

Children’s Health

Discover what’s possible. Browse these features to find out more about the impact of University of Minnesota research, education, and care—and how you can help.

Eugsters at 2013 Garden Party CROP.jpg

Camie and Jack Eugster believe that children deserve a comfortable environment when they’re sick that can cheer them up. That’s why, through their family foundation, the Eugsters sponsored an Adopt A Room on the hospital’s blood and marrow transplant unit—to brighten the days of children who typically face long hospital stays.

The Seymour family

When Marc and Mandy Seymour brought their infant daughter, Quinn, across the country to University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital to be part of a groundbreaking clinical trial aimed at curing her devastating skin disease, the hospital did not yet have an on-site chapel. Today the Seymours are honoring Quinn’s memory—and providing a place of peace and hope for others—by raising $500,000 to build a chapel at Amplatz.

ch_f13_blog_cover.jpg

The latest issue of Children's Health is now available in print and online.

Sarah Ramel, M.D., tracks NICU graduates' growth to find out which factors led to optimal long tem health. (Photo courtesy of Michael Schmidt)

The right timing can make all the difference. And where children's brain development is concerned, University of Minnesota researchers are finding that particularly important. "The earlier you intervene, the bigger impact you can have," says Michael Georgieff, M.D., director of the University's Center for Neurobehavioral Development and a neonatologist at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital. "You're laying the foundation for a healthy adult mental life."

Iris Borowsky, M.D., Ph.D. (Photo: Scott Streble)

Though the problem of youth violence reigns large in the United States, Iris Borowsky, M.D., Ph.D., is not one to dwell on the negative. Instead, she has spent the past 19 years at the University of Minnesota researching ways to prevent the problem.

Priya Verghese, M.D.

In April 2013, University of Minnesota physicians performed their 8,000th kidney transplant—almost exactly 50 years after their first.

Lizzie Bell (Photo: Jim Bovin)

While Lizzie Bell, 19, recovered from a blood and marrow transplant this summer, she turned her Adopt A Room in University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital into her personal photo editing suite.

LoveYourMelon.jpg

The young cancer patients at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital who lose their hair after chemotherapy now have a stylish way to keep their heads warm. Thanks to the organization Love Your Melon, more than 800 cozy winter hats and baseball caps have been given to children at Amplatz.

Jimbo and Candi Fisher and their boys, Trey and Ethan, found hope in the Fanconi anemia experts at the University of Minnesota. Ethan (on the left) was diagnosed with the rare blood disease earlier this year. (Photo: Jim Bovin)

ESPN highlighted U of M research support for FA in a story about the Kidz1stFund™, founded by FSU football coach Jimbo Fisher and his wife, Candi, whose son, Ethan, has FA.

Zach Sobiech (Photo: J Dunn Photography)

Through music, Zach Sobiech said goodbye to his loved ones. And in the process, the Stillwater teenager's YouTube music video for his song "Clouds" touched people around the world. Though Sobiech died of osteosarcoma, an aggressive type of bone cancer, on May 20 at age 18, his legacy extends far past millions of YouTube views. The Zach Sobiech Osteosarcoma Fund, created by Zach and his family through Children's Cancer Research Fund, exclusively benefits research at the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota that is focused on understanding the causes of osteosarcoma and developing new therapies for it.

As a special gift for Burke Derr, a lifelong teddy bear collector, his friends asked a teddy bear company to create a bear for Burke. The original Burke P. Bear arrived at the hospital five days before Burke died. Today Burke P. Bear is the world-travelin

He has toured 47 states and 23 countries to increase awareness of cystic fibrosis, and he gets hugs everywhere he goes. This furry advocate is Burke P. Bear, a cuddly teddy bear named in honor of Burke P. Derr, who died two days before his 19th birthday in 1997 from complications of CF. Today Burke's memory lives on through the work of his father, Bob Derr, for Pennsylvania Cystic Fibrosis, Inc., and the researchers it supports, including Antoinette Moran, M.D., at the University of Minnesota.

hoff_blog.jpg

Not many 2-year-olds spend the majority of their days in the hospital, running down the halls while their parents chase after them with IV drip bags.

For the young Taylor Hoff, this was a reality. He could rest his chin on the baseball-sized tumor on his collarbone caused by a rare condition called hemangioendothelioma.

But thanks to the quick thinking of his doctors, today Hoff is a healthy college student pursuing a career in medicine and volunteering in a research lab at the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota.

Champions for Children Celebrity Golf Classic

Join us for one of these upcoming events.

Keric Boyd

Physicians know delivering bad news is part of the job. But a diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) can be “terrifying,” says University of Minnesota pediatric oncologist Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D. EB causes the skin to slough off at the slightest touch. Wounds don’t heal, fingers fuse together, and eventually patients are unable to eat and are wheelchair bound.

Sabrina Ness

When 12-year-old Sabrina Ness takes the stage, her soulful, bluesy voice startles listeners. Think Norah Jones or Adele. Her songwriting is just as mature. “All of my songs are about making a difference in the world,” says Ness.

Addison Brynteson (Submitted photo)

It’s Tuesday and 4-year-old Addison Brynteson has just finished her weekly medical checkup. Next stop: “Anywhere with French fries and chicken strips,” jokes her dad, Joe. Last fall, this lively preschooler was diagnosed with severe aplastic anemia, a rare condition that prevents normal blood-cell production.

Grace O'Masta and her mother, Jenny. (Photo: Jim Bovin)

Grace O’Masta has come a long way from the devastating day in spring 2008 when her parents were told their month-old daughter likely wouldn’t survive the night. Born with an enlarged and weakened heart that wasn’t capable of pumping enough blood on its own, the Eagan, Minn., girl was living at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital, hooked up to the Berlin Heart—a then-experimental ventricular assist device— and on the waiting list for a transplant.

(Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Twins)

Don’t miss Neurofibromatosis (NF) Awareness Night at Target Field on May 18, 6:10 p.m., where the Minnesota Twins will take on the Boston Red Sox.

A sand table, swimming pool, zip line, and cozy swing help children relax when they're agitated.

They knew some of their ideas would raise eyebrows. But the clinicians who got together two years ago to plan renovations for the two-floor Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Intensive Treatment Center at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital felt that a big change just might make a big difference for kids.

Grace O'Masta and her mother, Jenny. (Photo: Jim Bovin)

Grace O'Masta has come a long way from the devastating day in spring 2008 when her parents were told their month-old daughter likely wouldn't survive the night.

John and Nancy Lindahl (Photo: Dan Marshall)

John and Nancy Lindahl are two of the University of Minnesota’s biggest cheerleaders. Together the two alumni successfully led a $90 million fundraising campaign for TCF Bank Stadium. Nancy also is a member of the University of Minnesota Foundation Board of Trustees, while John serves on its heart fundraising advisory committee. And through their many connections to the University over the years, they’ve only grown to appreciate it more.

Shane McAllister, M.D., Ph.D., received the University Pediatrics Scholars AWard in 2012. (Photo: Jim Bovin)

One of the most important steps in pushing medical science ahead is funding talented, young researchers who bring new ideas and approaches to solving health problems. That's the thinking behind the University Pediatrics Scholars Award, which has been given annually since 1990 to at least one promising pediatrician-researcher who's getting a fledgling lab up and running.

WineFest No. 18 featured artwork. <em>'Boco'</em>, by Luis Burgos.

We're celebrating University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital's history of achieving medical firsts and breaking records tied to improving outcomes for children by attempting to break another record at WineFest No. 18.

(Photo: Scott Streble)

Karen Kaler, wife of University of Minnesota President Eric Kaler, Ph.D., and Rebecca Kill, wife of head Gopher football coach Jerry Kill, rock babies in the neonatal intensive care unit at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital every week.

(Photo: David Sherman)

Adopt A Rooms are customizable, private rooms designed specially for kids and their families. Bedside consoles give children command of almost everything in their spacious rooms, providing the kids a sense of control during a time when they yearn for it.

tax_thumbnail.jpg

Thanks to recent legislation, you can again benefit from a popular tax-advantaged giving option.

Zach Sobiech (Photo: J Dunn Photography)

Zach Sobiech is practically a rock star. With just months to live, the 17-year-old teen from Stillwater, Minn., started writing songs to say goodbye to his family and friends. He never expected that his songs would make him world-famous. On Saturday, February 16, Zach and his friends will perform at a sold-out benefit concert at the iconic Varsity Theater in Minneapolis. Ticket sales will benefit the Zach Sobiech Osteosarcoma Fund through Children's Cancer Research Fund in support of leading-edge research at the University of Minnesota.

tolar_news_blog.jpg

Pediatric blood and marrow transplant physician Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D., has been named director of the University of Minnesota’s Stem Cell Institute.

Mason's-at-Amplatz-Sept-25-2012-5.jpg

The Grand Lodge of Minnesota and Minnesota Masonic Charities have jointly sponsored an Adopt A Room at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital, continuing the Masons’ decades-long commitment to improving children's health.

vikes_vid_blog.jpg

John A. Sullivan, center for the Minnesota Vikings, is donating $150,000 to make a new University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital playground possible. To support the project, Vikings linebacker Chad Greenway has donated $25,000 through his Lead the Way Foundation, and the Minnesota Vikings have contributed the remaining $25,000 necessary for the $200,000 project. Sullivan announced his support at a dedication ceremony on October 30.

Steven’s weight management team includes, from left: Jessica Graumann, pediatric clinical dietitian; Claudia Fox, M.D., director of University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital Weight Management Program; Mary Deering, R.N., weight management nurs

At 16 and more than 300 pounds, Steven was in a desperate situation. His weight was taking a toll on him physically and emotionally. He suffered from sleep apnea, “excruciating” headaches, showed signs of type 2 diabetes and was depressed.

Just a few minutes of light activity left him out of breath. He became housebound, spending much of his day in his room and in bed, taking classes through a home program.

Researxch by Margaret Semrud-Clikeman, Ph.D., is shedding light on how physiological differences in the brains of teens who have Asperger's syndrome may contribute to social challenges. (Photo: Jim Bovin)

Margaret Semrud-Clikeman, Ph.D., sees the pain and frustration often when she works with children who have autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and nonverbal learning disabilities. The preteens and teens participating in her studies often blame themselves for their outbursts, peer clashes, and trouble making friends -- their difficulty in controlling their emotions in general.

Over the summer, those kids got a whole new perspective on their behavior from the functional MRI brain scans taken by Semrud-Clikeman. With that powerful glimpse inside their heads, the kids saw that their brains may be larger in key spots and "fire" differently in certain situations.

522_UMN-Childs_9-25-10.jpg.jpeg

The idea of applying computer science to the traditionally medical domain of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) started with one provocative question: What if cameras and computers could capture and process information that even the most expert of experts can't?

The University's Aaron Kelly, Ph.D., leads a National Institutes of Health grant focused on combating childhood obesity. (Photo: Scott Streble)

Children born today will likely be the first generation ever to have a lifespan shorter than their parents'. It's largely because of one of today's most urgent public health concerns: childhood obesity.

Despite a terrifying entrance into the world, 2-year-old Christopher Kail is now sailing past his developmental milestones. (Photo: Jim Bovin)

When Cara and Michael Kail left home for Fairview Southdale Hospital for the birth of their fourth child late on September 24, 2010, Michael had planned to be home the next day to take their other kids to the Children's Theatre.

But a rare and very dangerous complication caused Cara to lose consciousness during labor early the next morning, which resulted in an emergency C-section birth. At one point, neither Cara nor new baby Christopher was breathing or had a pulse.

Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D. (Photo: Scott Streble)

Little compares with the heartbreak pediatric oncologist Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D., sees working with children who have epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a fatal disease that can cause the skin to slough off at even the slightest touch.

And though he was part of the pioneering University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital team offering promising but risky blood and marrow transplants aimed at curing the disease, he is now focused on finding a safer treatment alternative.

385s_AmplatzMove_4-30-11_blog.jpg

For the fifth consecutive year, University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital has been named one of the best children's hospitals in the country, according to U.S. News & World Report. It received accolades for its rankings in six pediatric specialties.

Cancer epidemiologist Julie Ross, Ph.D., finds energy in collaborating with others. (Photo courtesy of Children's Cancer Research Fund)

By the time she became a graduate student in epidemiology, Julie Ross, Ph.D., already knew she loved the lab. But a chance visit to an infant's hospital room helped put her on her life's path: researching the genetic and environmental causes of cancer, primarily pediatric cancers.

Jacqueline Dunlap (Photo: Emily Pillsbury)

Don’t miss Neurofibromatosis (NF) Awareness Night at Target Field on September 13, 7:30 p.m., where the Minnesota Twins will take on Kansas City. Four-year-old Jacqueline Dunlap, an NF patient at the University of Minnesota, will throw out the first pitch of the game.

Daniel Saltzman, M.D., Ph.D.

Ask any principal. It takes a lot to quiet an auditorium full of high school students. But when a video about the cancer research of University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital surgeon-in-chief Daniel Saltzman, M.D., Ph.D., played last February at Henry Sibley High School in Mendota Heights, the students watched in silence.

Tolar_049_retouch_thumb.jpg

As a pediatric oncologist, Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D., sees tragedy every day. But little compares with the heartbreak he sees working with children who have epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a fatal disease that can cause the skin to slough off at even the slightest touch.

"This is one of the most awful diseases I've ever seen," Tolar says.

A member of the pioneering University of Minnesota team offering promising but risky blood and marrow transplants aimed at curing the disease, he is now focused on finding a safer alternative. Two foundations led by fathers of boys who have EB will contribute a total of $450,000 for this research--if other donors will collectively match it.

(Photo: Jim Bovin)

Gabby Burington performs in jazz and tap dancing competitions, something her mother didn’t imagine possible when Gabby was diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis as a toddler. But this six-year-old doesn’t let her diagnosis define her or even slow her down.

(Photo: Julie Buck)

Tanner Buck, 11, is personable and polite, but plays hockey with a vengeance—he just won third place in a Wisconsin youth hockey shootout.

Tanner also has cystic fibrosis (CF) and has been treated at the University of Minnesota Cystic Fibrosis Center since he was 10 days old.

(Submitted photo)

Imagine facing the devastating diagnosis that your child has a rare condition that is fatal if left untreated...twice. For Julie and Brandon Williams, their worlds were turned upside down when both of their children, Luke and Molly, were diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

(Photo: Jim Bovin)

Rebecca and James Michael were expecting their second child in early November. But baby Emma could only wait until July 11, when she was born at one day over 23 weeks’ gestation, weighing a mere 1 pound 6 ounces.

Jakob Tolar, M.D.

In his work as a pediatric oncologist, Jakub Tolar, M.D., Ph.D., sees tragedy every day. But little compares with the heartbreak he sees working with children who have epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a fatal disease that can cause the skin to slough off at even the slightest touch. "This is one of the most awful diseases I've ever seen," Tolar says.

Though she weighed only 1 pound 6 ounces at birth, Emma Michael looked healthy to NICU Follow-Up Clinic doctors at 3 months adjusted age. (Photo: Jim Bovin)

Rebecca and James Michael were expecting their second child in early November. But baby Emma could only wait until July 11, when she was born at one day over 23 weeks' gestation, weighing a mere 1 pound 6 ounces.

While The Birthplace care team stayed with Becca at University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview, neonatologists immediately brought Emma to the adjacent University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital's neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and James followed.

Christopher and Cara Kail (Photo: Jim Bovin)

Cara and Michael Kail left home for Fairview Southdale Hospital for the birth of their fourth child late on the evening of September 24, 2010, Michael had planned to be home the next day to take their other kids to the Children's Theatre.

But a rare and very dangerous complication caused Cara to lose consciousness during labor early the next morning, which resulted in an emergency C-section birth, right in the labor room. At one point, neither Cara nor new baby Christopher was breathing or had a pulse.

University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital

Your annual gifts to support leading-edge research, education, and care at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital make a real difference to children and their families. But did you know you also can leave a legacy gift that will make a difference after your lifetime? When you include a gift to support children’s health at the University in your estate plans, your future gift will provide critical funding to accelerate the development of new treatments and cures for childhood diseases.

GabbyBurington__thumbnail.jpg

Gabby Burington performs in jazz and tap dancing competitions, something her mother didn't imagine possible when Gabby was diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis as a toddler. But this 6-year-old doesn't let her diagnosis slow her down.

Gabby regularly sees University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital specialists in rheumatology and ophthalmology, whose services are now centrally located on the University's Riverside campus. Anchored by the new hospital facility, the growing children's health campus is changing pediatric care at the University.


Make a Gift

Your gift is an investment in a healthier tomorrow!
Give Online  |  More Ways to Give