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Giving to medicine and health at the University of Minnesota

Innovators at Heart

Fall 2013

Starting early for success

With advice from the Cardio-Oncology Clinic, Jack Reher found a routine that made his heart strong enough to withstand a stem-cell transplant to treat his lymphona. (Photo: Scott Streble)

U cardiology and oncology experts team up to minimize heart damage in people undergoing cancer treatment

Early-stage cancer patients have become one of medicine’s biggest success stories, as the almost 14 million survivors in the United States would be happy to attest. But for many of them, another threat lurks in the background: heart disease.

Through its integrated cardio-oncology program, the University of Minnesota has taken aim at this problem with a full-bore range of research and treatment facilities geared toward the prevention and early detection of heart disease in cancer patients, and its physicians are helping patients already diagnosed with cardiovascular problems withstand cancer treatment.

In loving memory

Tom Busch's gift to aortic valve disease research honors his mother and hero, Dorothy Busch.

New fund will support research into groundbreaking cardiac care

When Dorothy Busch died in 2011 at age 92, her son, Tom Busch, told his cousin that his mom was his hero. The cousin, he recalls, replied, “You know, Tom, she was a hero to many, many people.” It was that sentiment that prompted Tom to set up the Dorothy M. Busch Memorial Endowed Fund to support aortic valve disease and related research at the University of Minnesota.

Patients as partners

Cindy Martin, M.D. (Photo: Scott Streble)

At the Adult Congenital and Cardiovascular Genetics Center at the University of Minnesota, Cindy Martin, M.D., works with people who were born with heart defects or inherited heart diseases and finds ways to alleviate their symptoms. But in the laboratory, she conducts research that delves deeper into what exactly in the patients’ genetic makeup caused their disease. And many of her patients jump at the chance to be a part of it.

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