Assignment 7

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For the last assignment I made a Pugh Chart-
pugh chart.pdf

I ranked everything using 6 criteria:
1. Am I competent?
2. Is there a clear need?
3. Can I communicate it clearly?
4. Is this emphasizing my strengths?
5. Are there good market opportunities?
6. Is it "novel"?

According to my findings, the best product to go forward with is "Snowboard Shoes", because it received the most +'s and it's something that I feel would be fun to work on.

I wanted to do a little more research on what makes them lock together and looked at different sliding and locking mechanisms. I also looked at different types of latches. Neither of these led to any results worth pursuing. I then thought about smart clothing technology and how I could make "Snowboard Shoes" work. I had previously thought about using a remote button release in a mitten, but there were concerns expressed about accidentally releasing the mechanism while riding the snowboard. Placing the release button on the snowboard goggles would make it a lot more difficult to accidentally activate it.

The foreseen weak spot of this product would be a literal 'weak spot' in the board. It would be right in the middle, where a majority of the force is applied. A snowboard is essentially a bridge between your two feet which means that compression, tension, and torsion act upon it constantly. This led to me deciding that this product would better be left uninvented. I then moved on to product which received the next highest number of +'s, the RoboBoots. I'm not as competent in the programming part which led to me giving it a minus on the Pugh chart. However, this is something I'd be more than willing to learn the mechanism of how it would work. I thought that the release button in the snowboard goggles would still be a good idea, but there'd be an emergency release on the snowboard bindings so there's a backup in case of an issue. The boots would be bound to the board by having holes in the bottom sides of the boots that metallic pegs can interlock into. I chose the name "Yuki Boots" because Yuki is the Japanese word for snow (and Japanese is my favorite language). It's easy to pronounce while adding an element of intrigue.

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Yuki Boot interlocking concept

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Yuki Boot Elevator Pitch

Assignment 6

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To reiterate last week's 10 ideas, here they are:

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Boots that use a slide/lock mechanism (Slide N' Locks)

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Boots and Bindings - Combined!

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Boots that attach directly to magnetic areas in the board

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Remote controlled enclosure - activated by a button in mittens (Remote Controlled Bindings)

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Foot enclosures on public transportation to allow safer rides

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Slip in bindings that remove back. (Burrito Bindings)
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Boots with interlocking snowboard parts (Snowboard Shoes)

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Remote controlled, lock bindings (RoboBoots)
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Twist in bindings
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Slide in bindings

With print-outs of these 10 ideas, I went back to Dick's Sporting Goods and REI.
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I interviewed a total of 17 people and kept track of which ideas they seemed most excited about. I also kept track of how much each person said they would pay for each idea if it was realized into an actual marketable product. Luckily, Taylor was also there (the inspiration behind the product need) and I was able to interview him as well. Based on the feedback, I'll be moving forward with "Slide N' Locks", "RoboBoots", "Snowboard Shoes", "Burrito Binders", and "Combined Boots and Bindings".

Slide N' Locks received an average of $201.59 with 12 votes
RoboBoots received an average of $450.30 with 11 votes
Snowboard Shoes an average of $345.50 with 14 votes
Burrito Binders an average of $206.50 with 10 votes
Combined Boots and Bindings an average of $400.30 with 11 votes

Taken from REI's website, here is the description of the 3 types of bindings that currently exist:
Types of Snowboard Bindings

Snowboard bindings are divided into 3 general categories:

Strap bindings are the most popular. Straps (usually 2) secure each boot in place; the highback does not move. They feature multiple adjustment options, excellent support and cushioning. Chief downside: Manually buckling and unbuckling the straps can be difficult while wearing gloves or in very cold conditions. Strap bindings are generally suitable for both soft and firm-flexing boots. Prices run from low to mid-range.

Speed-entry bindings (also known as convenience bindings) look similar to strap bindings but have a reclining highback to permit relatively easy in-and-out boot access. It is a time-saving design preferred by many casual riders. Feet are stabilized by a yoke system that applies uniform pressure across the forefoot. Performance-focused riders sometimes feel this sacrifices board control. These bindings are generally suitable for both soft and firm-flexing boots. Prices range widely, from low to high.

Burton EST (Extra Sensory Technology) bindings are compatible only with Burton's Channel mounting system. They eliminate the restrictions of mounting with discs, allowing the rider virtually unlimited stance, width and angle options. Price is at the high end.

There is also a recently funded Kickstarter product that is the most similar to some of my proposed projects. However, it's not widely available.

Link to chart describing interview findings with product offerings (Benchmarking)
Chart.pdf

Link to chart showing projected material/manufacturing cost (Patents & Feasibility)
Part2Snowboard.pdf

Assignment 5

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For my archetypical existing product, I've chosen snowboard boots/bindings. They're two separate items, but I believe by looking at them as a unit that product opportunities will arise. The problem statement relating to this product based on previous research is Taylor needs a quicker way to get from riding the lift to powder-ready because he spends a lot of time strapping back in after each lift ride. My previous -How Might We- question relating to this problem statement is How might we create a way to keep a snowboard on feet that allows easy on and off between rides?

For this assignment, I first made a list for each letter of SCAMPER - (substitute, combine, adapt, magnify/minify, put to other use, eliminate, reverse/rearrange) related to snowboard boots & bindings.
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Substitute
Can I change any of the parts?
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Boots that use a slide/lock mechanism

Combine
Can I combine or merge it with other objects?
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Boots and Bindings - Combined!

Adapt
What else is like it?
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A recently funded Kickstarter product using Neodymium magnets
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Boots that attach directly to magnetic areas in the board

Magnify
Can it be done faster?
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Remote controlled enclosure - activated by a button in mittens

Put to other use
What else can it be used for?
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Foot enclosures on public transportation to allow safer rides

Eliminate
What's nonessential or unnecessary?
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Slip in bindings that remove back. The purpose of the back is to help provide leverage for moving, but if it's compensated for by allowing greater leverage from the front, it can be eliminated.

Rearrange
What if we rearrange the snowboard?
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Boots with interlocking snowboard parts


Remaking Step-In Bindings
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Existing Step-Ins
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Remote controlled, lock bindings
Page 4 - Version 3.jpg
Twist in bindings
Page 4 - Version 2.jpg
Slide in bindings

10 ideas to move forward with:
Page 1.jpg

Boots that use a slide/lock mechanism

Page 1 - Version 3.jpg
Boots and Bindings - Combined!

Page 1 - Version 2.jpg
Boots that attach directly to magnetic areas in the board

Page 2.jpg
Remote controlled enclosure - activated by a button in mittens

Page 2 - Version 2.jpg
Foot enclosures on public transportation to allow safer rides

Page 3.jpg
Slip in bindings that remove back.
Page 3 - Version 2.jpg
Boots with interlocking snowboard parts

Page 4.jpg
Remote controlled, lock bindings
Page 4 - Version 3.jpg
Twist in bindings
Page 4 - Version 2.jpg
Slide in bindings

Assignment 4

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Brainstorming With Some Sillies!

Assignment 3 helped me create two problem statements with which to guide assignment 4. They are:
1. Taylor needs a quicker way to get from riding the lift to powder-ready because he spends a lot of time strapping back in after each lift ride.
2. Isobel needs a helmet that is conscious of her music needs while looking good because at present, she has created a temporary (and not always satisfactory) solution.

Changing these into "how might we" statements =
1. How might we create a way to keep a snowboard on feet that allows easy on and off between rides?
2. How might we protect a snowboarder from head injury while making music access possible?

I conducted a brainstorming session with some friends from the Architecture program in the College of Design a few days ago. Now I know that Architecture is rumored to be one of the most strenuous and trying programs at most colleges, resulting in little sleep and some crazy studio nights. Let me assure you, this also creates one of the most hilarious brainstorming environments I've witnessed yet!
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Pictured from left to right, Jessica White, Dennis MacAvaney, and Aicha Boujnikh. Not pictured from this session, Jake Brzezicki and Lane Madich

Before the session, I asked each of the participants to brainstorm a few ideas for each statement to get them thinking about the objective of the brainstorming session. They brought these and we added them to the center of the table after everyone presented them.

Next, we played my new brainstorming game! The purpose of the game is to get your brain going with associations and building off of others' ideas. The structure of the game is one person starts with the first word that comes to mind and the next person has to say the first word that comes to mind based on the previous word. The game has 2 minutes per session and the team has to generate as many associations as possible. This became quite funny as well...

Next... the brainstorming begins!
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Paper waiting for ideas...

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Jess meant to look prepared... instead, it looks like she really enjoys Prismacolors!

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Ideas waiting to be sorted!

Then the group used the silent sort method after pinning up each "how might we" category on wall. The three categories created with the first statement were, "boot innovations", "snowboard innovations", and "ideas that carry the concept of snowboarding with a different method". The three categories for the second statement were "helmets with smart technology" "non-conventional head protection", and "customized head protection". I chose to have each participant use a black marker to mark their favorite ideas with a circle. The purpose of having them use the same color was because they're all friends and I didn't want them voting on a particular idea just because a certain friend had voted. The IPM for the first category was .6 and .8 for the second category.

Top 5 Ideas from Category 1:
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Top 5 Ideas from Category 2:
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Thanks for reading!

Assignment 3

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Snowboarding!
For this assignment, it was good that I'm over an hour from my friends that I know enjoy snowboarding or I would have been tempted to interview them! I have done interviews of this type before and know that in-person interviews tend to be much more productive than an email/text/phone interview. To find people to interview, I started by going to a few different sports stores. They tend to hire people and have them work in an area that they personally are active in, so I thought this would give me access to some local snowboarders. Sadly, there isn't any snow (yet!) and local hills aren't open, so going to the prime place and interviewing wasn't an option.
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For my interviews, I had a short list of questions written down to help direct the questions, if needed. I also recorded (with permission) so that I didn't have to constantly be writing and I was able to come back to the interviews at home and write down parts that seemed significant. I ended up doing 6 interviews, 3 at REI and 3 at Dick's Sporting Goods. For all interviews, my main 5 questions were as seen below.
1. What's your favorite thing about snowboarding?
2. What's your least favorite thing about snowboarding?
3. Describe your best snowboarding experience.
4. Describe your worst snowboarding experience.
5. What snowboarding gear do you always have to have when boarding?

The follow-up questions to these were based on body language and responses to the initial questions. Prominent interview points are below, taken from my notes during listening to the previously-recorded interviews.

"After riding the lift up, I always have to strap back into my board. Mittens come off, snow gets brushed away, boots get strapped in, and mittens go back on."

"Board rental-type stomp ins are unpredictable. Easier and quicker to get into, but hella scary to trick with." (His words, not mine)

"I always listen to music while boarding. It gives me a better feel depending on what I'm doing."

5 out of 6 wear helmets when boarding, 2 of them being adamant about wearing it.

"Wearing my helmet keeps my head warm and my goggles on."

Based on these notes, my two problem statements are:
1. Taylor needs a quicker way to get from riding the lift to powder ready because he spends a lot of time strapping back in after each lift ride.

This is taken from "After riding the lift up, I always have to strap back into my board. Mittens come off, snow gets brushed away, boots get strapped in, and mittens go back on."

2. Isobel needs a helmet that is conscious of her music needs while looking good. This is taken from our discussion about her helmet and music and the process she goes through during snowboarding regarding these two factors. She was able to demonstrate in the store using a nearby helmet and her iPhone.

I then furthered my research by watching a lot of YouTube videos.

It was important to me that I watch many different types, including non-professional and professional, promotional and home videos. Since the invention of the GoPro, some of these have gotten a lot more interesting! I noticed more with the home videos how people strapped into their boards. I also paid attention to how many were wearing helmets (many) and how many weren't (not many, especially with more professional stunts)

Sochi Olympics are coming up in only 3(ish) months!
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I also did research as to what's currently on the market...
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I tried on my boots...
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and snowboard with bindings (not pictured, you sillies)
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I paid attention to how long of a process it was to strap into my board, even while on carpeting. (Soooooo long -.-) My boots are super easy to get into because they have the quick laces. I only put them on once though and my board goes on as many times as I go down the hill (a lot).
Look who says hey from last year!
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Assignment2

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This entry could also be titled "the night I watched too much Ellen and gave myself a stomachache"... seems a little to wordy though. To get myself in the creative mood, I started by watching some vines on vinescope.com and then proceeded to youtube where I thought it'd be funny to watch Ellen scaring people or sending them elsewhere and watching them get scared.

Then, Ellen talks with this adorable old lady from Austin, TX.

She doesn't get scared... but she has probably one of the best confessions -EVER-.

Well, by that time I was lost in youtube world and homework part 2 and 3 wasn't getting done. I was having a great time though! My sister and her friend Michelle came over to figure out what I was laughing so hard at... Andy's neck in the one video completely disappears and I found it quite hilarious. So did they. Maybe you will too.

I managed to get a "Winter" mind map made!
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I had a hard time trying to make "silly" ideas at first. I kept wanting to make something that was a potential "marketable" product. Then I realized I was being to serious and tried to make some products that would make me laugh. The subcategories I used were "Winter Bonfire", "Winter Sports", "Winter Clothing", and "Winter Snow Removal". Many of them contained the "bonfire" aspect of winter that can be found in my mind map. It seemed like a very good way to solve the snow/ice problem because it would melt the snow instead of having to shove it around and make snow piles. The "sport" subcategory influenced two of my products. They could possibly be used in the next Winter Olympics! The "snow removal" category played a fairly large part because I feel that is one of the most annoying parts of winter. The "clothing" category is one of the most interesting to me because it has the potential to work with smart clothing. It is also one of the subcategories that I would benefit from the most during my cold, somewhat lengthy commute to school.
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I also wanted to incorporate the holidays into my product ideas.

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For all these images, you -should- be able to click on them to make them larger. It worked when I tried it so, X fingers crossed X!

I had a lot of fun with this assignment, even if I did get sidetracked a few times. YouTube can be a bottomless pit of time wasting...

Assignment1

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For the first assignment, the objective was to innovate a new cookie. I spent a better part of the first day thinking about cookies I've eaten and why I've liked them, as well as food/flavor combinations. Then, I got this fortune cookie which I thought was appropriate. IMG_2243.jpg

Since I didn't have any ingredients at home, I went shopping!
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I started by buying things that sounded good/interesting and ingredients necessary to hold a cookie together. This was a very interesting shopping trip! (Not exactly what you'd call very healthy either...)

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Step 1 was to buy a lot of stuff. Next was to flavor bounce and taste test the different flavor ingredients that I had.
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I chose to narrow down the ingredients used in my cookie first so that I could adjust ratios of the final ingredients without consuming 50 cookies. I did this by trying multiple different ingredients together.
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One of the most interesting I tried was grilled mango marinated in mango curry sauce, marshmallow fluff, toasted coconut, and macadamia nuts. Interesting... but not exactly the cookie I'd want to eat again.
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For my final ingredient list I chose fresh ginger root, green ginger tea, toasted coconut, and brown sugar. IMG_2248.jpg
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Then I added flour to hold the cookie together. I tried a few different ratios to make sure it held together without being gummy. I also tried different ratios of each ingredient to get the best flavor combination. I topped the cookies with different ingredients as well to see which I liked the best, - macadamia nuts, toasted coconut, and plain- . IMG_2255.jpg
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I had a few friends volunteer to try these three variations and vote on which their favorite was. The vote was unanimous for the toasted coconut, ginger, and brown sugar cookie! I will be bringing that final recipe to class tomorrow and it's as follows.
Ginger, Toasted Coconut, & Brown Sugar Cookie
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Take a 1/2 cup of brown sugar and 1/3 cup of warm ginger tea and combine. Let sit until sugar is all dissolved. Add 2 Tbsp. of minced fresh ginger and let rest for 10 minutes. Toast 1 cup of coconut in 350 degree oven until golden brown. Add 3/4 cup of toasted coconut to brown sugar and ginger mixture. Reserve 1/4 to use as topping. Add 1/3 cup of flour, mix. Divide into equal portions and put on an ungreased cookie sheet. Top with remaining toasted coconut. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden brown around the edges. Cool slightly and enjoy!

What I feel makes this cookie creative is that I went through multiple taste tests, used different flavor bouncing combinations, and tried slight variations on iterations of the cookie ratios. I also was able to eliminate ingredients and look at them as "mistakes". I had friends help test, evaluate, and compare the different options. The final cookie is one that doesn't show up when I Google the main ingredients and the word "cookie" so a wide-published recipe of it doesn't exist, which most likely means it isn't a common cookie. The final cookie is one that I'd definitely want to eat again! It's also one that the flavors themselves sound intriguing, meaning I'd buy it at the store without knowing how it tastes. This means it has value.

I look forward to trying cookies in class tomorrow!

UPDATE!
Oct. 28 10 AM
I have added 1/4 cup of butter to make "lace" cookies. It happened on accident, but totally worth it. Crispy on the outside, chewy on the inside... yummmm.

Recent Comments

  • dunba043: Your pugh chart was a little confusing. You have drawings read more
  • fadne019: I really like how you went into the field to read more
  • hafte004: First off you did a good job creating clear pictures, read more
  • halve356: I really like the snowboard shoes concept. I’m imagining some read more
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