Assignment #4

| 8 Comments

Please read this entry carefully: This assignment is worth 5 points and will be due by midnight, May 1.

Please visit the Minneapolis Institute of Art exhibit Facing the Lens: Portraits of Photographers (http://artsmia.org/index.php?section_id=2&exh_id=4026) and do TWO things:

1) Choose one photograph from the show to which you feel a strong connection or have a strong response. Describe the photo (including the title and artist) and explain your connection/response to it in a comment to this entry.

2) Participate in the Exhibition: (http://www.flickr.com/groups/facingthelens)

Upload your self-portrait to the MIA's Facing the Lens: Portraits of Photographers group on Flickr. All photographs in the pool will be shown on a screen in the Harrison Photography Gallery for the duration of the show. The MIA requests that you include your name, title of photo, and the date the photo was taken (this information is added to the photo from your Flickr page). Once you have added your photo, please post a link to the Flickr page of your photo (under "Share This" option near the top left of page, choose "Grab the Link") as a comment to this entry.

Both parts of this assignment need to be completed by the deadline to receive points.

8 Comments

I chose Arno Rafael Minkkinen's photo "Fosters Pond Millennium", that was created on January 1, 2000. I felt strongly connected to this piece because of it's athletic appearance. The photo was a self image of Arno's arms and legs reflecting on top of a pond's surface. The photo is in black and white and clearly focuses in on his limbs and their reflections. The tone of his muscles cast an energetic feel that made me want to go out an run. The performance and endurance running takes is illustrated quite nicely in Arno's piece. As an avid runner myself I connected to the true simplicity and excitement of the photograph.

Part One: The photograph I chose was titled "William Eggleston in his Music Room" taken by Alec Soth. A swarm of different emotions hit me while viewing this photo. I found myself continually coming back to it. It was one of very few portraits in color, and its size was very attractive. It was a fairly large piece. To me, it didn't seem like a portrait. This man was the only thing in focus, and the only thing he was focusing on was his piano. He was seated on a wooden box rather than a comfortable looking chair that was close by. He was surrounded by musical equipment that was just scattered about. This photograph represented the significance of everyday nonsense. It's a celebration of simplicity.
Part Two: http://www.flickr.com/photos/62339720@N02/5674083567/

The photo I chose was titled "Fosters Pond Millenium, January 1, 2000." It was a black and white photo taken outdoors at a pond. The photo showed just the legs, feet, arms and hands of the photographer- not any other body part. His body was positioned in a way that looked as if he was bent down and about to take off running, but I couldn't be certain because the rest of his body was not in the photo. He was positioned in the top center half of the photo, but his body was reflected in the pond and continued down to cut through the entire middle of the photo. To me, his limbs looked like trees taking over the photo, and his fingers and toes looked like roots.
I felt a connection to this photo because, as humans, we have placed ourselves in the center of nature and made ourselves "bigger" and more important. This idea was presented in the photo. The background of the photo was foggy and the trees behind the subject were difficult to see.

I chose Foster's Pond Millenium by Arno Rafael because it spoke to me in the simplest visual form. IT seems both supernatural and natural all at the same time. And I feel as thought the black and white helps you to understand what is happening in the photo and it really helps make the water look more like a mirror that it would in color.

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This page contains a single entry by GiGi published on March 25, 2011 8:23 PM.

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