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Joan's entry to Chapters 1-4

I liked the questioning, inferring, clarifying, predicting, and evaluating activities Gallagher suggested to increase reading comprehension.
The questioning activity of turning headings or chapter titles into questions prior to reading on page 57 and "twenty questions" on page 58 sound engaging.
"Conversation Piece" on page 5 would be a good reading activity stressing the importance of inference while reading.
The web search activity on page 38 wherein groups of students are given different key words or concepts to search and report back to the class frames a novel by clarifying key background information.
The word scramble prediction on page 49 would give students a set of key words in order to predict the upcoming action and pique their curosity.
Focus groups ( page 59), each group given a specific literary element to trace while reading, sounds good for review. Another review strategy is "sentence starters" , ( page 70) where each student is given a different sentence starter to finish with information from the reading.
I liked the word attack strategy of memorizing the 30 most common prefixes, the 15 most common roots, and 10 most common suffixes of words (page 73). I also liked the 3-minute sponge activity (page 77) where students copied a sentence with a challenging vocab word, predicted the meaning based on context, and looked up and wrote the actual meaning of the word.
"Tuning into the reading channel" is a term I'll use from Gallagher and reminding students that confusion is natural is something I needed to be reminded of because it is the state I'm frequently in.


Comments

In the Beers book I read last year, there's a great activity for using word roots, prefixes, or suffixes to create vocabulary trees. I tried that with my students this year, and it worked very well, but I was overwhelmed by the huge lists of common roots, suffixes, and prefixes I found on the internet. Gallagher's shortened list will be very useful.

Joan,

You wrote, ""Tuning into the reading channel" is a term I'll use from Gallagher and reminding students that confusion is natural is something I needed to be reminded of because it is the state I'm frequently in. I agree and I think it is important that students understand that confusion is part of everyone's learning process.

Mary

Jen and Mary,
In working with the gifted and talented students of our district I find that many of them have perfectionistic tendencies and the idea of confusion throws them for a loop. The idea of making a list of Degrees of Confusion or being lost help students to give themselves in a public forum the right to b e confused.
Lynn

Joan-
I liked your honest response to being confused or in a state of confusion oftentimes. I can relate especially when students throw me off, so this list of degrees of confusion will help. Of course, we could always collaborate on a teacher's book called "A Teacher's Guide to Degrees of Confusion," but that might be confusing!

Joan,
I think I mis-posted above and wanted to recomment on your entry. I too have found many valuable techniques to be used with students in Deeper Reading. I even used a speacial pencil mark to code them for Fall and in come cases even noted the books I will use those specific activities for. I am especially delighted by the way so many aspects of the curriculum are highlighted with games and activities. I made it a goal to seek out new vocabualry activities over the summer and this book helped meet that goal.
Lynn