Alcoholic: Born or Raised an Addict?

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nat-nurt alcohol.jpgOne of few things that comes to mind when I think about the "Nature vs. Nurture" debate is alcoholism. Is there certain traits that one must inherit in order to have addictive behaviors? Or do addicts pick up their habits from the friends and family around them? Many contributing factors of this problem (some call it a disease) are discussed in this article titled "Alcoholism: Nature vs. Nurture." In my opinion, I believe that those who have addictions also have the power to overcome their addictions or prevent them from happening in the first place, even if it is encoded somewhere in their genes. Many experts say that alcoholism runs in the family--if you have a family history of alcoholics, your chances of becoming an alcoholic are increased. Looking at the picture above, I don't think any baby comes out of the womb wanting to crack open an ice cold Rolling Rock! Though I do see how certain traits that cause addictive behaviors can be a large contributing factor, I think what substance one is addicted to is affected more so by their environment. Among many other nature/nurture debates, alcoholism is one topic that remains unclear as to which plays the stronger role. As said in the article, however, "most experts would agree that it is probably a combination of all these factors - family history, personality, environment, and genetic predisposition - that leads to someone becoming an alcoholic." If you are in a family with a history of alcoholism, you have both nature and nurture playing their roles: alcoholics in your environment and in your genes.

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This was a well written article. The picture is very funny and I like how you referenced it in your paper. You also did a nice job of adding an article and quoting from it to help strengthen your argument. One thing to consider adding (I know that space is very limited) would be a statistic saying what percentage of children of alcoholics become alcoholics themselves. This statistic, however, might not serve any use in the nature vs nurture debate (so I understand why it is not in your article) but I was just curious as to how high alcoholism is in children with alcoholic parents. Overall it was a solid article.

Great article and funny picture! I think it's issues such as alcoholism that kind of blur the nature vs nurture line and cause people to lean one way or the other. I still tend to feel it's a combination of both. Thanks for the read!

I agree with you on your statement that environment has a bigger impact on alcoholism than genetics. These articles lead me to wonder how a person who comes from a family that has a history of alcoholism would act in an environment where he was never exposed to alcohol. Would he/she still have some sort of craving for it? Also, the picture is very funny!

I agree with your take on nature vs. nurture in terms of alcoholism. I think that although you may be born into a family history of alcoholism, it is ultimately the "nurturing" and environment you are in that determine if you will be too. If your parents are alcoholics, you are growing up with that, and the mere fact that you are around alcohol in such a drastic way can lead to alcoholism. Funny picture! Your integration of the picture into the text was awesome!

I very much agree with you on this topic. I think that the nurturing effect has more to do with it than nature. But as you said many scientists will argue that its a bit of both. I think you truly have to experience this addiction or overcome it to admit that its more nurture and it is not embedded in your genes to want to drink alcohol.

I really agree with your opinion. I believe that people can choose whether to become alcoholics or not. Of course some people might have higher dependency on alcohol genes in their body. However, they still have a choice to not to drink. I think the picture support your post really well. I like it. Good job :)

I thought the blog was very well written. I liked the use of visual media with the picture of the baby. I would definitely agree that environment has most of the influence over it. I do think the there are some genes that predispose people to certain addictive behavior, but for the most part outside influence would affect it the most. It would be interesting to find out what percentage of alcoholics grew up with parents that struggled?

You did a nice job on the Blog. I really enjoyed the use of visual media with the picture of the baby. I would also tend to agree with the idea that it has to do more with one's environment than with one's genetic makeup. It would be interesting to see some data on the percentage of alcoholics that had parents who were, or it to even see if insecurities like a broken home or abuse lead to alcoholism. I still do think that some of it is do to genetic causes, but in general I believe it has to do with the environment.

You did a nice job on the Blog. I really enjoyed the use of visual media with the picture of the baby. I would also tend to agree with the idea that it has to do more with one's environment than with one's genetic makeup. It would be interesting to see some data on the percentage of alcoholics that had parents who were, or it to even see if insecurities like a broken home or abuse lead to alcoholism. I still do think that some of it is do to genetic causes, but in general I believe it has to do with the environment.

I picked up this blog first to read for its catchy title. I am kind of interested in this topic. And after reading this blog, I think the author did a very good job. The author not only discussed the nature-nurture in her(verified, searched on the UMN website) own opinion, but also having an article from external website to support the idea that alcoholism cannot be simple explained as a inherited phenomenon.

I picked up this blog first to read for its catchy title. I am kind of interested in this topic. And after reading this blog, I think the author did a very good job. The author not only discussed the nature-nurture in her(verified, searched on the UMN website) own opinion, but also having an article from external website to support the idea that alcoholism cannot be simple explained as a inherited phenomenon. Also, the picture helps a lot on this topic. The picture is so funny that keeps me reading over the blog. All in all, I think that alcoholism gets more emphasis from the environment. If one's parents often drink a lot, their child probably gets impact from that. Again, it is really a good explanation. Thank you for sharing that!

With a picture that funny.. of course I had to read this. I definitely agree with most people on here that there is a combination of nature/nurture factors. Even though environment is a big piece, I think it's a good idea to be aware of whether or not you are genetically predisposed to alcoholism. I have a friend that will not drink just because he knows he is genetically prone to alcoholism. Smart.

I like how you choose alcoholism as an example of Nature vs. Nurture concept. It is a very engaging post. In my opinion, I feel that alcoholism behavior is developed from environmental factor. I feel that this behavior is not gene-based. Regarding to the statement "it runs in the family", I feel that the offsprings of alcholic parents are influenced by their family habit of drinking, so it is not really in their genes. However, I might be wrong. Anyway, it is really a great post! Nice work!

This is a great topic to talk about. I had a friend in high school that was adopted because his mother was addicted to drugs, so yes he was actually a "crack baby". all through high school he never drank or did drugs until his senior year. He finally experienced what it was like to get high or get drunk and he loved the feeling. So my friend got addicted really fast. Which became really sad because he would always want to do drugs and alcohol. And it got to the point were he overdosed, however, it was i life changing experience because he stopped doing drugs after that. So i definitely agree with you because there are addictive traits but people that were born into a troubled family like that are definitely able to overcome it and not be a alcoholic.

I really liked your article! This is a very good example of nature vs. nurture. I believe that it is very hard to distinguish between nature and nurture, most likely because it is a part of both. Alcoholism in particular is hard to tell because it is said that alcoholism runs in families, meaning there gene's. But at the same time those with alcoholism in their families that means that the kids are raised by people that have problems with alcohol, so it is a part of their upraising.

Good article with a very interesting topic! I agree, that with most nature/nurture cases, it will always be a combination of both. I especially liked your concluding statement that if someone has a family history of alcoholism, their chance of carrying on that same behavior is increased greatly because of the genetic and environmental influences.

I like how you applied alcoholism to the nature vs. nurture debate. I think that if somebody has a familial history of alcoholism it may increase the chances of them becoming an alcoholic, but ultimately it is the environment they were raised in that decides it.

Your article really demonstrated your points well and it was also interesting! I think that alcoholism is due to many factors like you listed, and your picture does a really good job describing that because like you said, a baby does not come out of the womb wanting to crack open an ice cold Rolling Rock. I do believe that genes do increase the chance of becoming an alcoholic because certain traits do cause addictive behaviors. Overall, you did a really good job at presenting you points and I really agree with them.

Your blog was very interesting! It gave me comfort knowing that I won't automatically have a destiny of being an alcoholic coming from a family where there is a history of alcoholism. You're picture was also hilarious! It's intriguing to think about all the different things that play a role in alcoholism.

This blog caught my eye because I've had this discussion with friends of mine recently. A few friends were adamant that alcoholism and other addictive personalities run in the family genes, while another was positive it was just environment. Having a personal family history of alcoholism, I agree that it is a combination of the two. You definitely are more prone to having an addictive personality passed down through genes, but it doesn't mean you must become an alcoholic. My grandpa struggled with alcohol abuse, but only one of his four children ever had an issue with it. Interesting and relatable topic!

I really liked your article. Since I was fairly young I'v been told I'm at risk for alcoholism, because of my dad. Im happy to say he's been clean for 17 years now. As you said, people do have freewill, and I would add to that education. During elementary are school had a little group for kids at risk you'd meet once a month talk, and do something fun. This I kinda feel has helped, I drink, but I don't ever feel like a need a drink to make it threw the day.

I have many people in my family that are alcoholics and have heard the story that my dependency on alcohol may increase because of that. I think the biological nature of it does still play a certain role but like you said it's not that they come out addicted. You always have the chance to change your path and your way.

I think that it is both nature and nurture that play a role in whether or not you become an alcoholic. Experts say that alcoholism runs in families, but a big part of this is the fact that alcoholics are more likely to have alcohol around the house and out in the open, so their children become exposed to it at an earlier age, and get the idea that it is very accepted and a norm in the culture to consume it frequently. I also believe that everyone has the ability to avoid becoming an alcoholic, or to change their behavior if they really want to.

This was a very well written article. I think that there is an equal importance of both nature and nurture that play a role in the development of autism. I think that there is a genetic influence that affects someones addictive qualities, as well as other influences like maybe depression. Then nurture plays a roll in someone taking to the bottle. If someone grows up seeing other people around them solving their problems with alcohol, they may see that as a way to solve their own problems. Very good article!

Very interesting post and great article to supplement your research. This is a subject I go back and forth on sometimes. Sometimes I think someone whose parent(s) are alcoholics would make a point on not becoming an alcoholic because of the negative externality. At the same time, the habits could be hereditary, so some people have an especially difficult time controlling themselves.

Super interesting blog! I personally feel that it is a combination of all the factors you listed. It is impossible to really separate nature and nurture in these situations making it hard for researchers to truly know. Alcoholism is fairly common so I think it is important for people to realize they may be more at risk than others for it!

Nice article love to read |Buy Research Paper| the whole new thought of this site which is truly good and interesting. Alcohols should be demolished from this world in order to save our future generation good and more established.

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This page contains a single entry by lynch375 published on February 5, 2012 7:29 PM.

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