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The Brady Bunch

Post comments in response to the episode, "Where There's Smoke," and/or to the program generally.

Comments

Wow. Entertainment has changed significantly. I found watching the one episode to be enough of the brady bunch. One thing I noticed is that when the son was playing the guitar and singing they made this a large part. I expected that scene to be over much sooner than it was. Also that fact that smoking was such a big deal. In todays sticom it would be expected to have a few characters smoke or have some kind of addiction. The acting was also not as smooth as today.

The Brady Bunch is a perfect and trusting family. All the kids got along fine and weren't fighting. The kids talked to their parents in a nice and polite way and discussed their problems openly. The older son new smoking was bad and he talked to his parents openly when they confronted him and the parents didn't holler or lecture him about. Everybody dressed nice in the show and some of the expressions they used like: heavy or gas are really old and I haven't heard some of them before.

The Brady Bunch is a perfect and trusting family. All the kids got along fine and weren't fighting. The kids talked to their parents in a nice and polite way and discussed their problems openly. The older son new smoking was bad and he talked to his parents openly when they confronted him and the parents didn't holler or lecture him about. Everybody dressed nice in the show and some of the expressions they used like: heavy or gas are really old and I haven't heard some of them before.

The Brady Bunch concentrated primarily on one thing and one thing only. If this same episode were recreated now, I believe it would have much more substance to it. It would not have just focused on Greg smoking, but also on a problem the girls had. It definitely was a lot different then television now. When Greg told his friend to tell his parents about the cigarettes, his friend never would have to the truth in a new sitcom. There are a lot more twist and turns to the sitcoms that are currently on the air, but I think that we still use the same base for the sitcoms.

The program is old, but I had never seen it before. The family is perfect, the parents are wonderful to the children and the relationship between them is fantastic. We all know that in real life things are quite different. But I can understand what kind of family TV programs wanted to show. Also I can see that the program wants to show just one issue per episode, but it turns to be too focused and sometimes even silly. The most interesting thing about the program is how different it is if you compare with similar programs nowadays.

The Brady Bunch portrays a lost vision of how the old families used to cope together. The way they speak to each other, especially among the siblings, is just not how many families’s act with one another today. You compare the polite way the boys all call their father sir and their mother ma’am, to the way the family life in such shows as the Simpsons, where there is a total lack of respect between one another. The daughter just feels terrible for telling on her brother, and the guilt literally tears her apart inside, knowing that her brother might dislike her for doing it. When something like that happened between me and my siblings, it was almost the job of the youngest to tell mom and dad what kinds of things were going on behind their backs. Old shows like these just go to show how much different things used to be, especially how much more respect people had for one another back then.

This episode of The Brady Bunch was a little anti-climactic. It seemed to go by very quickly, and with little conflict. I found it interesting, and I think this is the case in other episodes, that there was basically only one story line. The episode solely focused on Greg, and his smoking problems. The other children were hardly involved, especially the younger boys. The whole conflict of smoking wasn't a very big deal because the parents trusted him right away, and trusted him later when the pack "fell" out of his jacket pocket.

If this was a sitcom today, there would be another story line mixed in, probably dealing with a different child, and in the end the two would come together. Also, it seems like sitcoms today tend to include all the usual characters in every episode. There would also be more conflict. Greg would probably get punished, and the whole mystery of the pack in his jacket would probably take more than one minute to solve.

This episode of The Brady Bunch shows the difference of sitcoms back then. It makes sense that this show was geared toward kids, because it is very simple.

Maybe Im an old man at heart, but i found watching the BradyBunch to be a pretty good time. Part of me, however, was merely amused at the absurdity of some of the writing...but it also brought back memories of watching the show at my grandma's house when i was a little kid. Maybe i was just feeling nostalgic rather than entertained but failed to discern the difference at the time.

I definitely think that a modern-day version of the same scenario would play out differently. As someone else alluded to, ciggarettes would be a lesser concern for a tv family these days. It would be interesting to see the Brady family cope with Greg on meth, or perhaps PCP. Marsha probably would've gotten a different reaction upon admitting that she was the nark.

Maybe Im an old man at heart, but i found watching the BradyBunch to be a pretty good time. Part of me, however, was merely amused at the absurdity of some of the writing...but it also brought back memories of watching the show at my grandma's house when i was a little kid. Maybe i was just feeling nostalgic rather than entertained but failed to discern the difference at the time.

I definitely think that a modern-day version of the same scenario would play out differently. As someone else alluded to, ciggarettes would be a lesser concern for a tv family these days. It would be interesting to see the Brady family cope with Greg on meth, or perhaps PCP. Marsha probably would've gotten a different reaction upon admitting that she was the nark.

I think the Brady Bunch is an unrealistic family, although it resembles the type of family that most of us should strive to be like. I say they are unrealistic because they seem to be flawless. Most families now in the present and even the past all had their own problems and hardships and these problems never got resolved as smoothly as the problems that the Brady Bunch encounter on the show. It’s definitely not impossible to have a family as well rounded as theirs but it is very unlikely in today’s society. Another thing I want to point out is how close the siblings are and how little they fight. I love my siblings too but our relationships are not nearly as cheesy and open as theirs. I’m not saying this is a bad thing what-so-ever, I’m just saying it is very unusual for siblings to behave the way they do. I guess they aren’t true blood related siblings but they act like it. Also, normally siblings want to snitch on each other to get the other into trouble for enjoyment at seeing the other get scolded, but Marsha felt bad for snitching on Greg’s smoking. I found this very odd. This episode kind of made me see how life has really changed since then and how surreal this show really is when compared to real life today. It was definitely fun to watch though and worth it. I enjoyed it.

It was interesting to watch the Brady Bunch now that I am older and have not seen the show for quite a few years. I remember that it used to be a show that I would like to watch and I thought it was entertaining and fun. Now I can definitely see why the show was more geared towards kids and not so much adults. The interaction of family members is interesting too and I think that while it was a show it still reflects what people of that time thought a family should look and act like. The picture of a family has changed big time from then to now. (Also, how much bank is that dad making? They have a stay-at-home mom and they can still afford Alice to work for them?)

This episode of the Brady Bunch shows how much television's culture has changed since when this show was aired. Television today has become much more liberal and "out there" than the Brady Bunch was. The girls were acting like smoking was the worst thing in the world for someone to do. In today's tv world, that is the least of what happens. There are entire shows now about teens getting pregnant and doing much worse than smoking.

The acting and special effects were also nothing compared to tv today. I had never noticed how horrible the acting was until I watched it today. I can't beleive I used to think this was a good show when I was a kid. But I can see why this was aired during that time period because it focused on having such a wholesome family at all times.

The Brady Bunch has been a classic model for families since the years it was first introduced. Having two parents, three boys, three girls, and even a maid is a picture of the outmoded family compared to todays televison. Today, sitcoms are all about independancy, and entertainment that sells.
This particular episode, like other past family sitcoms, has a common theme in their "lesson of the day". They all discuss issues that affect both society as a whole, as well as families individually. Smoking in the past was more of a concern at that time, so the context of the Brady Bunch was the perfect candidate to show how smoking affects the entire family rather than the individual. Moreover, older sitcoms are less focused on only individuals. So ironically, sitcoms show problems everyone will eventually experience.

I grew up watching the Brady Bunch when I was younger. This sitcom was almost a way for me to fantasize about having a larger family with many more siblings. Growing up with a brother that is four years younger than myself was hard because we never really connected during our childhood. Recently, our relationship with one another has gotten much better and we are able to talk about things that we feel we can't share with our parents.
The Brady Bunch pieces together the image of what a perfect American family should be like such as trustworthy, honest, giving, loyal, and so on. My family falls far from perfect to these standards, but to my own standards my family is perfect in the way I want them to be. My parents have trusted me even during my teenage rebellious moments and they have never given up on me.
It seems to me that many sitcoms during this decade, along with the past and future decades, feed off the whole "family" theme, whether it is a family that is abnormal, far from perfect, perfect, or just typical. In comparing sitcoms today to sitcoms back then, it is safe to say that many things that weren't acceptable then are more acceptable now. For instance, sitcoms don't pry off of teenage smoking anymore. Now it is the fear of drugs, unsafe sex, and drinking and driving. It is almost scary to think of how TV shows will change in the next 20 years.

I remember watching a few episodes of the Brady Bunch when I was home sick in gradeschool. I could never really get into the show. Most likely because it's so unrealistic and it's just flat out bad acting. In this episode, Greg is caught smoking after school with some of his buddies. Back then it was a big deal, but now-a-days the reaction wouldn't be as dramatic. I was really surprised by the way his parents reacted. They just believed him without any doubt. Nobody's real parents would actaully do that. There's no way. There would be some sort of punishment and loss of trust.
The Brady Bunch as a whole represent a very surreal family situation. Sure they have their issues, but they magically fix them within a matter of minutes. This rarely happens in real life. Nobody's parents would just be like "Oh, you smoked? Just once? Oh don't worry about it. It's alright. We won't punish you." Maybe in a perfect world, but there's no such thing as perfect.
Sitcoms have definitely changed over the years. They deal with more recent social issues and have WAY less perfect families. There are also animated sitcoms now with families that are surreal in a different way. Instead of being perfect like the Brady Bunch, they're dysfunctional and silly. Seeing as most sitcoms have changed with the times, it'll be interesting to see what they will be like in the future.

One thing that particularly stuck out to me in this episode was the excessive characterizations employed. Mrs. Jonson was made to be the conservative and overbearing mother, and this depiction was taken to quite the extreme. She appeared, cloaked in drab earth toned suits, neck scarves and all. She rarely, if even once, smiled throughout the episode, and spoke with caution and reserve. Carol Brady, the trusting and tolerant mother, was expressive and cheery throughout. She was dressed in vibrantly colored sleeveless dresses, which only furthered her lighthearted image. These stereotypes filtered down to the children as well. Coincidentally, the kids that introduced Greg to cigarettes were not simply friends from school, but they were the members of a ‘super heavy’ rock band. Most everything about the show is just that much overdone. Marsha’s conscious is just a little too squeaky clean, Greg is just a little too distraught, Carol and Mike are just a little too relaxed. Marsha, kids don’t usually rat themselves out. Greg, you got off, let it go! Mr. and Mrs., maybe your kids aren’t the angels you thought them to be. That’s life. Alice, on the other hand, can keep up the good work, as far as I’m concerned.

I remember seeing this episode when I was younger, and seeing it again yesterday all I can say is how stupid some of it is. As mentioned in class also, the one thing that has always stuck out to me about the Brady Bunch is that its not the traditional family. Comparing them to all the other shows involving families with children most of the families are normal. I also think its strange that all the kids call each parent mom and dad even though both aren't they're real parents. Its especially true for the older kids because based on my experiences with people I have known who have step parents most don't think of the step parent as mom or dad. Though its not the normal family they are portrayed as a good family with great family values who are fair, moral, etc. So although the structure of the family isn't normal their behaviors are portrayed as ideal possibly to divert attention away from the family structure. Its also strange that they had a maid who was in a way like a third parent. Alice did all the maid stuff like cooking and cleaning, but she also helped the kids with their problems.

I found the episode of the Brady Bunch to be quite interesting. The Brady family has an incredible amount of respect for one another. I find it amazing that the parents believe Greg concerning the cigarettes. Today everyone seems to be much more skeptical and gaining someone’s trust is hard to achieve. I liked the father’s approach to smoking, saying it isn’t right and was a dumb thing to do, but then openly admitting that he did dumb things too. In today’s society often times when a child makes a mistake there is an automatic punishment, rather than open conversation concerning the mistake and what should have happened. When parents don’t allow their kids to make some mistakes by “sheltering” them the parent’s are setting them up for failure. I think the Brady bunch should be looked at as a role model family due to their ability to cooperate peacefully with one another while being a non-blood related family.

This episode portrayed an interesting view of how the parents acted toward their children. The Brady Bunch shared a high degree of trust within the family. Even with the incidence with the cigarettes, they still believed in their son. At the very least it seemed that there would be some kind of punishment, and then apologetic when he was proven innocent. The family image seems to be a popular topic for all TV sitcoms. People may be interested in the concept of what an ideal family should be. I know that not too many families are exactly like this, I know mine isn't. My parents have taught me so many lessons throughout my life and along the way a trust was built. I was never really punished, but the thought of letting my parents down was a bigger burden on me that taught me the lessons. Most people always have a story about something they regret, and these experiences provide the lessons that would be taught to the future generations. Although they portray an ideal family in the Brady Bunch, each family has its own unique way of functioning as a whole.

I think the Brady Bunch is a perfect example of a family that has a an almost perfect nature. Families in reality do not function the way the Brady Bunch. I think that might be why during the time the sitcom was produced that it was not that popular. I think it is hard for a family to watch another family on TV be better and more understanding than yours is. For example, when Greg was caught smoking he immediately knew what he did wrong. Not only that, his parents fully trusted him when he said he learned his lesson. This scenerio does not usually happen in reality. I think this might be the reason that the Simpsons, Family Guy, Malcom in the Middle, and Grounded for Life are so popular. They portray a disfunctional family that is not perfect in the least but comes together in the end and provides a moral for the viewer.

I think the Brady Bunch is a perfect example of a family that has an almost perfect nature. Families in reality do not function that way the Brady Bunch does. I think that might be the reason why during the time when the sitcom was produced it was not that popular. It is hard for a family to watch another family on TV be better and more understanding than they are. For example, when Greg gets caught smoking he immediately knew what he did wrong. Not only that, but his parents fully trusted him when he said he had learned his lesson. This scenerio does not usually happen in the world we know. This might be the reason that the Simpsons, Family Guy, Malcom in the Middle, and Grounded For Life are so popular today. They portray disfunctional families that always manage to come together in the end and provides a moral for the viewer.

When I was younger I actually enjoyed watching the occasional Brady Brunch episode. Watching this show now was almost painful and difficult to watch. The storyline was boring and the acting was almost entertaining because it was so bad. I think that the Brady Brunch family is quite unrealistic in comparison to the modern day family, in most cases. In this episode, Greg was honest and up front with his parents about the smoking and cigarettes. In response, his parents completely trust Greg with no questions asked. I doubt that most modern day parents would believe and trust their children completely. The depiction of families on tv has also changed a lot over the years. The Brady Bunch was shown to be a perfect family where everyone trusts one another and the entire family works together to solve problems. Today, we have families like the Simpson’s and unconventional families on tv.

When watching the Brady Bunch, it is funny how much times have changed. In the Brady Bunch Greg was sorry for what he had done, and his parents believed that and trusted him very much. Now days in tv shows the kids are usually rebelling and the parents would not believe their kids about something like that. The Brady Bunch is just a classic example of the "perfect family", not too perfect so it seems fake, but perfect in a way that they all communicate so well and have "good morals and ethics".

Along with the subject content of the show, now days that would be considered a joke almost for a storyline. In the show, smoking was such a shocking thing for someone to do, and the people that did it were considered the bad boys, and they were in a band. But now in real life it seems like many people start to smoke that young, and it has in a way normalized.

This episode was very interesting. I used to watch episodes of the Brady Bunch on Nick at Night but I hadn't seen this episode before (at least not that I could remember). What makes it interesting is to see the Brady Bunch take on the "issue" episode considering how much lighter BB is than most sitcoms which do "issue" episodes. The issue they chose to cover in this episode was relatively tame and non-controversial (even for the '70s) which seems like a reflection of the Brady Bunch's lightness.

In some ways this actually helped the episode mitigate the problems "issue" episodes face in heavily-episodic television shows (that is, shows where there's little plot or character development between episodes). Chiefly their presentation of Greg's decision to try cigarettes and the consequences of that could be realistically portrayed in the timespan covered by a single episode. Many other issues covered by "issues" episodes of other shows don't nicely fit into a single episode making the resulting compressed character development comic (in a bad way).

On the other hand, even for such a tame issue they don't seem to try very hard at demonstrating the long-term consequences of it. For example when the parents are talking I believe the father says "I smoked when I was younger" and the mother replies "But we didn't have all the evidence then" without specifying what evidence. None of the characters who are shown smoking are portrayed as having any negative health consequences from smoking (except Greg who was coughing because it was his first time). There were ample opportunities they could have taken to show this. Additionally the anti-smoking activist friend was portrayed in a slightly negative light by being over-zealous about stopping smoking (such as dropping off a literal table-full of reading material at a moment's notice and practically shunning Carol for believing her son about the pack of cigarettes in his jacket). Overall the episode's message was watered down to a weak "don't smoke because we say so."

I've always enjoyed watching the Brady Bunch, used to watch it all the time as a kid. But I always thought they had a weird family. I know times have changed a lot between now and then. It just seemed too unrealistic to me to have a family that got along that well and handled difficult issues so easily. Even for something like smoking it was a big deal back then to be a kid and smoke. but his parent's took Greg's word that it wasn't his pack and believed him right on the spot and didn't really question him when he couldn't explain how it had gotten in his jacket, and even when they found out he had smoked it was weird that because he was sorry and wouldn't do it again that they didn't ground him or do any other punishment towards him for his actions. I thought they would tell him he couldn't hang out with those kids again or not be able to do that show. because what if they pressured him into smoking again like they did the first time or even they might have pressured him into doing other wrong things just to look cool Greg might see how easily his parents took the smoking issue and think that he could do something else bad that they might not even find out about but if they did find out he might think that they would take it just as lightly as they did with the smoking issue.

Watching The Brady Bunch made me chuckle a bit at the implied simplicity of the plot line and progression of the episode. The simple conflict-resolution model coupled with elements of internal conflict of certain characters serves as an excellent example of a traditional sitcom. In contrast, modern sitcoms often focus on more than one conflict in the same episode.

I also thought it was interesting how Greg was the oldest of the boys and yet still cared very much about permission and approval from his parents. Although this may still ring true in modern sitcoms, much of what I see is a pattern of the eldest children rebelling a bit as they start to gain independence.
Parenting styles were highlighted in the episode as well. The head of the anti-smoking committee was oblivious to her own son's smoking habit and felt the need to exclude Carol from the committee when she thought Greg was the one smoking. In contrast, Carol didn't doubt her son for a second and fills the role of the model television mother figure with both trust and affection. One might wonder what Greg's parents might have done if Greg was caught with or framed to have possession of a more serious substance. This episode was aired in 1971, so the truth of the matter is that American families did deal with their teenagers experimenting with drugs. Some parents were experimenting with drugs as well. And these teenagers were most likely not the ones sitting at home watching The Brady Bunch with their seemingly wholesome parents. This illustrates that the sitcom is sometimes built as a model for a certain generation, but does not necessarily mimic it.

Some people might look down their noses at how the situation portrayed in the episode of The Brady Bunch would never play out the same way in modern reality or sitcom. Yet, we still look back and giggle at the simplistic nature of the show and somewhat unrealistic "happy-go-lucky" attitudes of many of the characters and are left to wonder if our own perceptions have been reversed. Has the unconventional become conventional over time? Why do we accept modern sitcom programming with ignorance to the lack of realism while scoffing at the same type of programming from different eras?

The show The Brady Bunch is definitely over stimulating compared to today's sitcoms. Watching it today, I find the family is way too unrealistic. Everyone in the family gets along perfectly. They calmly and collectively discuss conflicts with one another. When Mike and Carol found out their older son Greg was smoking, they simply sat him down and asked him about it. Greg was completely reasonable with them and didn't argue one bit. He also reacted pretty calm when he found out that Marcia was the one who told on him. I think today none of this would had happened. Families argue. It is that simple. They get upset with one another and have ridiculous arguments. The Brady Bunch is trying so hard to be a perfect family that it comes off fake. Watching The Brady Bunch was an eye-opener to what type of family was ideally portrayed in that time era.

The episode that we watched in class was one that I have seen before. The first time that I watched it was when I was in elementary school so it was a big deal that he was smoking to me. At that time when the shows that I would be watching besides this would be all children shows. Compared to the shows that are on TV in this time. The parenting could not be anymore superficial. That is why I like to watch this show if it is on well I am taking my study brakes of course now days.