2) Magnitude and Trends

Compared to other forms of transit, motorcycle riding is known to represent an elevated risk of injury and death. In fact, it has been consistently demonstrated to be associated with an elevated fatality rate compared to passenger vehicles. Most recent data demonstrate a fatality rate of 73 deaths/100,000 registered motorcycles in 2005, compared to 14/100,000 registered passenger vehicles. (4)

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"Motorcycle Safety Program." National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Jan. 2003. http://www.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/motorcycle/ motorcycle03/McycleSafetyProgram.pdf

Notably, the motorcycle fatality rate is known to be disproportionately elevated compared to the percent of registered vehicles in the country and the percent of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). In fact, in 2001, it was noted that motorcycles represented 2.2% of all registered vehicles in the US, and accounted for 0.34% of the VMT, but accounted for 7.6% of the total traffic fatalities for that year. (2)

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"Motorcycle Safety Program." National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Jan. 2003. http://www.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/motorcycle/ motorcycle03/McycleSafetyProgram.pdf

The motorcycle riding community has experienced tremendous growth during the last two decades. From 1997-2005 motorcycle registrations jumped 63%, from 3,826,373 to 6,227,146. (4) Additionally, new sales have shown significant a significant increase as well, up approximately 91% since 1997. (2) However, fatalities have risen disproportionate to sale, rising yearly from 1997 to 2006, from 2,116 to 4,810, amounting to a 127% increase. (4)

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"Action Plan to Reduce Motorcycle Fatalities." U.S. Department of Transportation Oct. 2007. http://www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/Communication%20&%20

Additionally, this increase in motorcycle related fatality has occurred while overall fatality rate for registered vehicles has actually declined modestly from 1997. (4) With the decrease in overall traffic related fatality rate, motorcycle fatalities now represent a much more substantial proportion of roadway fatalities, up from 5.0% in 1997, to a disturbing 11.3% in 2006. (4)

Though young adults aged 20-29 continue to be the demographic most affected by motorcycle related fatality, from 1997 to 2006, adults over the age of 40 had the most dramatic increase. In fact, there has been a 172% increase in fatalities in adults aged 40-49, 307% increase in adults aged 50-59 and 280% increase in those over 59 years. (4) In tandem with this, motorcycle ownership amongst those 40 years of age and older has increased significantly, from 15.1% in 1980 to 43.7 percent in 1998. (2)

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"Action Plan to Reduce Motorcycle Fatalities." U.S. Department of Transportation Oct. 2007. http://www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/Communication%20&%20

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"Action Plan to Reduce Motorcycle Fatalities." U.S. Department of Transportation Oct. 2007. http://www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/Communication%20&%20
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While the number of fatalities has increased in all categories from 1997 to 2006, and the largest number of fatalities occurred in the 501-1,000 cc engine size group (41%), the largest increase in fatalities was in the 1,000 to 1,500 cc group (38%). (4) Additionally, 2/3 of the motorcyclists killed in this group were over 40. (4)

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by olso1784 published on April 3, 2012 12:11 PM.

1) Introduction was the previous entry in this blog.

3) Economic Impact is the next entry in this blog.

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