Assignment #1

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As part of a creativity experiment, a task was set to create a cookie that no taste bud had ever salivated over, but would soon crave the novel morsel. With such a task one must start with a background, research of what makes a cookie a cookie. As I pondered this adjectives flew through my mind; sweet, salty, round, chewy and so on. Common types included peanut butter, chocolate chip, sugar cookie, and oatmeal raisin. This could not be the only criteria of what made a cookie a cookie so I turned to an authority known for describing things, good old Merriam Webster. The dictionary's definition was as follows,

Cookie: a small, sweet cake typically round, flat and crisp.

If this were the only criteria the possibilities were endless, especially since we could experiment with the flavor, form, texture, cooking process, and presentation. Really this put everything that defined a cookie at risk. Watch out cookie, innovation has arrived. Further research took place and I started looking at different cook books to understand the general anatomy of a cookie before the major reconstructive operation began. A commonality between recipe's of Betty Crocker, Simply Sweet, and Gluten-free Desserts was that there was an 1:1 ratio of butter, white sugar and brown sugar and a 2:5 ration between those and flour.
The criteria for the project were as follows: novel, valuable in the eye of the consumer, feasible, be visually recognizable as a cookie, gluten-free, dairy-free, basic so that they would be easy to make with few specialty ingredients, sweet, moist, and overall an enticing flavor. I recruited reinforcements and had my buddy Ryder help we with flavor idea generation and baking help.

Step One: Creating a Foundation

At first my goal was to create a cookie that was not made from flour. My family has Gluten allergies, which means they very rarely get baked goods that taste even half-way decent. I personally have lactose allergies so the cookies could not use butter, creams or anything of the kind. I was starting from the ground up by starting with mixing my own flour combination. Instead of butter, a soy butter substitute was used. The base consisted of:

3 ½ c. Millet Flour
2/3 c. & 2 TBSP Potato Starch
2/3 c. & 2 TBSP Tapioca Starch
2 ¼ tsp. Xanthan Gum
2 c. soy butter
1 ½ c. white sugar
1 ½ c. packed brown sugar
4 large eggs

Then we turned to our first recipe

#1 Oops Won't do that Again
½ pomegranate squeezed
1 doz. Raspberries
1.2 Haralson Apple
1 tsp. Honey
¾ c. cookie base

mix first 4 ingredients and simmer on stove until majority of moisture has escaped and starts to clump together. Add base and simmer on stove until a thick consistency.

The result after letting it cook for 15 minutes at 325 degrees was that it looked like we had just perform an organ transplant and rabbit livers were lying on cookie sheet.
The taste was horrible. It had a pasty taste that coated your throat and sent your bitter taste receptors off to the point that they identified it as poison and the gag reflex was initiated. The cookie also didn't rise because baking soda had not been added and the soy butter proved to be much too salty. After adding more Tapioca starch and Quoba flour in the attempt to make it sweeter, a test bake was done. We decided that the large batch of base we had made was a hopeless bowl filled vile tasting contents. Back to square one.

Meat Cookie
New Base

½ c. shortening
½ c. white sugar
½ tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
½ c. brown sugar
1 c. 3 TBSP flour
1 egg

This base was tested and cooked without any additional ingredients to ensure that it rose correctly and had good flavor. Since we were using shortening instead of soy butter, salt was added and the resulting cooked base was crisper than the other previous two. We were biting off more than we could chew when setting the criteria of being gluten-free. It was hard enough to make a cookie taste cook, let alone design a good-tasting gluten-free flour on top of that. The Gluten-free criteria was dropped and regular all-purpose flour was used. The batch was also made smaller so that if the taste ended up going south again, we wouldn't waste so much. The base was a success.

Step Two: Flavor Idea Generation

Ingredients

We created a list of flavors combinations was created from the ingredients we had at our disposal. At first we based them off of the foods we knew they worked well together already such as Peanut Butter and Jelly (Common Sandwich) and PB and Curry (Indian dishes). We then moved to more creative sweet combinations of other ingredients. We split the cookie base into 11 parts (1/8 c.) then added the ingredients to the base, mixed and added additional flour if needed.


#2 PB & J Cookie
1 TBSP Peanut Butter
½ tsp. Twinberry Jelly

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees.
Result: Not enough jelly and too similar to a basic peanut butter cookie. Feasible: Yes
Valuable: Yes
Novel: No

GInger

#3 Peanut Butter Pickle
2 tsp. Peanut Butter
1/2 Baby Kosher Pickle
¼ tsp Pickle Juice

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: Pickle Chunks need to be larger. Good sweet and salty combo.
Feasible: yes
Valuable: possibly
Novel: yes

Pickle

#4 Peanut Butter Curry
1 tsp Peanut Butter
½ tsp Curry powder

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: Delicious, but a bit too crispy
Feasible: yes
Valuable: yes
Novel: yes

peanut curry

#5 Chocolate Apple
1 tsp Peanut Butter
1 TBSP Apple Butter
1 TBSP Chocolate Chips
1 TBSP Flour
2 Dashes of Cinnamon

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: Very dense so less flour, good flavor
Feasible: yes
Valuable: yes
Novel: yes

chocolate apple

#6 Chocolate Mint
1 tsp Coco Powder
½ tsp Blueberries
2 Leaves of Fresh Mint minced
1 tsp Banana
1 TBSP Flour

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: Add less flour, use mint extract instead
Feasible: yes
Valuable: yes
Novel: possibly

IMG_1137.jpg

#7 Fruit Cocktail
¼ tsp Orange Juice
1 TBSP. Melon Juice
2 Pineapple Chunks
2 TBSP Flour
1/16 lemon peel

Bake: 7 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: Good flavor less flour
Feasible: yes
Valuable: yes
Novel: possibly

orange

#8 Morning
1 tsp. Coffee Beans
1 ½ tsp Coco Powder
1 tsp Banana
1 tsp Walnuts

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: needs more moisture and coffee beans need to be broken up-> texture
Feasible: yes
Valuable: yes
Novel: possibly

IMG_1141.jpg

#9 Ginger Cookie
1 tsp Ginger root minced

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: Need to have Dark Chocolate coating
Feasible: yes
Valuable: yes
Novel: yes
IMG_1135.jpg

#10 Tropical
1 tsp. Banana smashed
¼ tsp. Coconut
1 dash Cinnamon
1/8 tsp. lemon peel (loose not packed)

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: Good flavor once cooked, too much moisture
Feasible: yes
Valuable: yes
Novel: possibly

orange

#11 The Mean Green
½ tsp. Lime Juice
2 tsp. Avocado
3 leaves Cilantro minced
2 leaves Mint minced
1 TBSP Flour
1 tsp Chocolate Chips

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees
Result: good texture and appearance, but bad taste.
Feasible: yes
Valuable: no
Novel: yes

IMG_1140.jpg

#12 Chili Chocolate
1 tsp Coco Powder
1/8 tsp Ground Red Pepper
¼ tsp Honey
1/8 tsp water

Bake: 10 Minutes at 400 degrees
Result: less pepper and add chocolate chips
Feasible: yes
Valuable: yes
Novel: yes

Thumbnail image for CHili Chocolate

Step 3: The Ultimate Pick

Due to the Unique Flavor and good texture, the ginger root cookie was determined the one that turned out the best if the addition of a chocolate dip was incorporated. At first we were very dependent on peanut butter and were making more incremental combinations, but as the experimentation persisted more creative combinations came about. The chocolate ginger is creative in the way that it is dipped instead of having coco powder mixed in or chocolate chips giving it a much different texture between the hard chocolate layer and the chewy ginger cookie. The taste is also very different and has a strong ginger flavor with sweet undertones. Instead of using ground ginger, fresh minced ginger root was used adding to the different texture. The shape remained the traditional circle to ensure that it cooked evenly. The chocolate covers the dryer outer edge of the round cookie to try to preserve the moisture that remains as well as an attempt to make the crunch outer edge just as desirable as the chewy center that is without a chocolate coating.


Final Recipe:

Chocolate Gingers

3 TBSP 1 tsp Ginger root minced
½ c. shortening
½ c. white sugar
½ tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
½ c. brown sugar
1 c. 3 TBSP flour
1 egg

Bake: 10 minutes at 400 degrees

While cookies are cooling melt dark chocolate in double boiler until a good dipping consistency, mix continually. Once cookies are cooled off dip edges of cookie into chocolate or to taste.

image.jpg

2 Comments

This is the first blog entry that is truly care about the assignment that I have rad so far. Good work! What I really like about your entry is how you constantly reminding yourself the true meaning of this assignment and rating them based on what we have learned in class through different categories. You had a good process of test baking and flavor choices with high consideration of your allergies background. Without fearing risk, you have done a great job of doing many iteration, which leads to experiences and ideas. I was a little disappointed in the pictures. They could have been better if you put the cookies on a plate rather than a zip lock bag, good thing that they are mostly consistent in style. I also think that you should decorate, design this blog to fit your theme of writing. Anyway, good work.

I appreciate you splitting the design process into two parts. That fact that you knew you needed a set base to add your flavors to shows a knowledge of both cooking, but also innovation. Start with what you know and add/iterate on top of it. Many iterations, as you have shown helps creativity, like Barry said in class. More ideas total = more creative ideas.
It sucks that you had to throw out a whole bowl of "vile tasting contents" but you obviously learned from that after iterating. Also, as said above in the first comment, a plate for pictures would have showcased each cookie better than a bag.
The pictures with recipes and grading on feasibility, value, and novelty are prime.

Good blog post.

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This page contains a single entry by orrxx118 published on October 28, 2013 11:15 AM.

Assignment # 2 is the next entry in this blog.

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