February 2012 Archives

Leadership Update

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Last week's definition:
Leadership must be based on an understanding of yourself, the group you're leading, and the situation on hand. Knowing the problem can be the most important part of leading. If this problem is a complex ethical dilemma, you can begin to progress by knowing where you stand. A leader must lead "in close proximity to their base value" (Kidder).

This week's definition:
Leadership must be based on an understanding of yourself, the group you're leading , the situation on hand, and a self-awareness of your own strengths and needs. Knowing and communicating the problem reduces the stress placed on the leader, and as Heifetz (2009) states, even if this involves explaining the problem to someone outside the organization (2009).

Analysis:
This week's readings have shown that leaders must be aware of how leadership can take a toll on a leader who is too focused on defining himself by his role. A leader must take a step back and view the organization as a whole before throwing himself into a problem. By doing this, he can effectively handle problems and not shy away from difficulties.

Heifetz, R., Grashow, A., & Linsky, M. (2009). "Leadership in a (permanent) crisis." Harvard Business Review, 87(7), 62-69. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=keh&AN=41997981&site=ehost-live

Kidder, R. M. (2003). "Overview: The ethics of right vs. right." How Good People Make Tough Choices (pp. 13 - 29). New York: Simon & Schuster.

Leadership Update

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First definition:
Leadership must be an outward expression of personal skills that bring others on board to a great mission. The other individuals must trust you, so the approach must be genuine and ethical. The ethical element requires the reasoning skills to understand what is right, not just your personal motivations and desires (Paul and Elder, p.6).

This week's definition:
Leadership must be based on an understanding of yourself, the group you're leading, and the situation on hand. Knowing the problem can be the most important part of leading. If this problem is a complex ethical dilemma, you can begin to progress by knowing where you stand. A leader must lead "in close proximity to their base value" (Kidder).

Analysis:
This week's readings have shown that leaders must be deft in dealing with ethical problems beyond simple right vs. wrong. A leader must use ethical reasoning to overcome the complexity of these conundrums.

Kidder, R. M. (2003). "Overview: The ethics of right vs. right." How Good People Make Tough Choices (pp. 13 - 29). New York: Simon & Schuster.

Leadership Update

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First definition:
Leadership is the skill set that allows a personal to motivate and coordinate others. It allows a person to achieve success above and beyond their own capabilities by harnessing the talents of others through an inspired and shared vision. Leadership is a two-way street, and therefore must be tailored to the followers.

This week's definition:
Leadership must be an outward expression of personal skills that bring others on board to a great mission. The other individuals must trust you, so the approach must be genuine and ethical. The ethical element requires the reasoning skills to understand what is right, not just your personal motivations and desires (Paul and Elder, p.6).

Analysis:
After this week's readings, it is clear that ethics play a critical role in motivating others. By maintaining a higher purpose, you can lead more effectively by holding the shared vision. Ethical reasoning allows people to strive to make the world a better place: a goal that can easily be translated and shared.

Paul, R., & Elder, L. (2006). "The Function of Ethics -- and Its Main Impediement." Understanding the Foundations of Ethical Reasoning (pp. 4 - 36). Dillon Beach, CA: Foundation for Critical Thinking.

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