Local Government Innovation & Redesign

To support local government redesign efforts and recognize the innovative work already underway, the Public and Nonprofit Leadership Center has partnered with state associations to create the Local Government Innovation & Redesign Guide and host a yearly Local Government Innovations Awards ceremony.

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lgi web.jpgAnnouncing the 6th annual Local Government Innovation Awards with InCommons!

Minnesota faces the reality of an aging population, rising health care costs, and an increasing demand for government services with reduced revenue. Yet many counties, cities, and schools have refused to let the traditional approaches of either increasing taxes or cutting spending exclusively dictate their responses to these challenges. Instead, they are pursuing a third way: innovation and service redesign.

The Humphrey School's Awards recognize the creative ways counties, cities, and schools are making Minnesota better and doing things differently. In keeping with previous years, up to 18 local government entities will be recognized as award winners for their innovative work. But there's also a twist. This year, Minnesotans can cast their vote to help determine the entrant that will receive $25,000 to continue local government innovation and redesign work! The Awards will officially open for entries October 2, 2012, and more information can be found at www.InCommons.org/LGIA.

The Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota is pleased to partner with the Association of MN Counties, the League of Minnesota Cities, the MN School Boards Association, and InCommons to conduct the 6th annual Local Government Innovation Awards. This year's Awards have been made possible with the support of InCommons, an initiative of the Bush Foundation that inspires, supports, and connects community-powered problem-solving.

Learn more and begin preparing your entry at www.InCommons.org/LGIA

Comments

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Minnesota faces the reality of an aging population, rising health care costs, and an increasing demand for government services with reduced revenue. Yet many counties, cities, and schools have refused to let the traditional approaches of either increasing taxes or cutting spending exclusively dictate their responses to these challenges. Instead, they are pursuing a third way: innovation and service redesign.

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