II) What is Queering?

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Queering and queer theory attempts to question norms, reclaim abjected spaces and identities, and construct new dialogues for ideas about identification, boundaries, passing, temporality, and resistance. Through this course I've been able to understand the ways that Queer is employed as an intelligible identity category, as a noun, which seeks to encapsulate identities that claim to be fluid or outside of the heterosexual matrix. I've been able to understand the ways in which employing Queer as a noun can be problematic because it attempts to make intelligible the unintelligible. Use of the term Queer as a noun has created tension between generation of folks who claim abjected identities because younger generations seem to claim a fluid, unintelligible-reclaimed-abject-Queer identity, but at the same time the term Queer sparks some memories of violence for older generations of gay, lesbian, and transgender folks from when Queer was used to abject and humiliate. Using the term queer as a verb offers some productive opportunities to deconstruct and rework understandings of intelligibility. To queer something means to understand and question the histories and performativity of terms in attempts to construct new dialogues for ideas about identification, boundaries, passing, temporality, and resistance.

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I like the distinction you make between queer as a noun and queer as a verb. I agree that queering as a verb seems to have more potential than queer as a noun. I wrote about this issue on my blog here and here. What sort of community (or coalitions or affinity groups) does queering allow for or prevent? What about Queer? And, as I suggest in my blog entries: what might it mean to think of queer as an adjective?