Main

October 23, 2007

Blog #3 Work Place Experience

Race has affected my experience in the workplace in terms of the kinds of jobs I’ve had. Over the course of years I’ve had four jobs and all of them were a different experience when it came to treatment and expected accomplishments. I usually don’t have a probably with getting jobs although I’m African American. But only one out of the four jobs made it difficult for me to become an employee.

Continue reading "Blog #3 Work Place Experience" »

Blog #3 Work Place Experience

Race has affected my experience in the workplace in terms of the kinds of jobs I’ve had. Over the course of years I’ve had four jobs and all of them were a different experience when it came to treatment and expected accomplishments. I usually don’t have a probably with getting jobs although I’m African American. But only one out of the four jobs made it difficult for me to become an employee.

Continue reading "Blog #3 Work Place Experience" »

October 22, 2007

Blog 3

I have been working for more than three years at Icing by Claire's, a national discount jewelry store chain most commonly found in malls. As the store sells jewelry and other accessories, virtually all of the employees are and have been female. This include upper management as well. This uniquely gendered business setting has had some interesting effects, both positive and negative, for the employees. One of the positive aspects has been the genuine feeling of sisterhood between the employees in my store. Though the faces have changed throughout the years, the women of Icing by Claire's Rosedale have an uncommon bond of friendship and teamwork that I have not encountered in any other work situation (and I've had a lot of jobs!). I can honestly say that I have made some lifelong friends as a result of this job. Part of this could be attributed to the fact that the number of employees in the store is small (we have a staff of 6), but I believe that it is also due to the all-female environment. While I realize this is making some generalizations about mixed-gender or male-dominated workplace, I believe that the female-dominated environment creates an atmosphere of calm because of the freedom from the threat of sexism and harassment in the workplace. There is also less cutthroat competition and more encouragement to do well.

One negative aspect however, is the pay. Icing employees by no means earn a living wage. Luckily I am working part-time and don't necessarily need the money to live. However, my manager has had to take a second job because the wages she is earning at Icing is not sufficient enough for her to live comfortably. The pay that we make at Icing is probably less than other comparable retail jobs, and I believe that this is largely due to the fact that Icing is a female-dominated job. Employees at other retail jobs such as electronic stores or gaming and hobby stores are mostly male, and accordingly make more money. While I would argue that retail jobs are probably not paying living wages regardless of gender, the impact is worse on females because there is still this assumption of women's work being merely "supplemental" income and not primary income.

I find this pay gap ironic especially considering the fact that the upper-management is almost exclusively female. One would think that these women would understand the unique financial situations that women face, from married women to single moms to college students trying to make it on their own. Unfortunately, however, it would appear that they suffer from the same ideas of gender and money as their male counterparts

Experience in the Workplace

I obtained a position at the Minnesota Department of Corrections, Stillwater prison. I was treated fairly by the employers initially, but one month into the position I was terminated for something that an informant told the investigation unit.

Continue reading "Experience in the Workplace" »

Blog #3

I personally don't have much experience in the work force, so I asked my mother about her experiences. She told me that she got hired for her current position as a civil inspector with a construction company because she was an African American woman. The company was hoping to get a construction contract with another construction company, but a requirement of that company was to have a diverse staff. What I mean by a diverse staff is that they had to have not only white people but people who are considered to be the minority (i.e. African Americans).Even though my mother got hired because she is an African American woman she still gets paid less than some of her co-workers because she does not hold a degree in this particular field.

gender in the workplace

Throughout all of the years I have been employed, the majority of my jobs have not seemed to cause me any problems because of my gender and race, probably because of the line of work I have chosen to be involved in. My first job was working as a sales associate for two different women's clothing retail stores. In both of these jobs rather than women being discriminated against or given differential treatment it was typically the males working in the store that would be treated differently not only by managers but also by customers because it was assumed that they would not have as much knowledge or fashion sense to be as successful. However, it is important to note that despite the unspoken assumptions about their talent or abilities, men were of course hired as sales associates and managers and not simply stuck in the back room to lift boxes or do "manly" work.
The next job I had was in sales, in which every person was equally encouraged because everyone's success meant success for the office. There seemed to be an equal number of men and women in management positions and in successful sales positions and the nature of the work encouraged everyone to really strive for the same goals and outcomes. Basically anyone who had the basic skills to do the work were given the opportunity and expectations to succeed. It seemed to be a wonderful environment to gain skills and experience, especially for women who are often treated differently in the business world because the success of every individual person, male or female, meant success for the office and the corporation.
One job I can recall in which I had a negative experience was when I applied to be a server at a restaurant just after high school. When I came in for the interview, the manager took my application, looked at me and told me I could be a bartender regardless of my lack of experience because I was attractive and would get a lot of tips. Once I started working I was constantly looked down upon by the people who trained me because I felt uncomfortable flirting back with or even handling the comments from drunk men at the bar. After taking a trip to Las Vegas for a high school dance competition (of which my boss excitedly assumed I was a stripper and asked what club I danced at) nearly all of my hours had been cut.
My current job, working as a canvasser for NARAL, I can say very confidently that there is no sort of discrimination or from what I can see, discomfort of any kind. Not only are all of us self-declared feminists (men and women alike) but as part of our work we take special concern to these sorts of issues. Our staff is consistently changing due to changes in different people's lives and is consistently diverse as far as sex, race, economic background and sexual orientation (although there are quite a few more women due to the subject matter). It is also the first job I have ever had that does not discriminate based upon physical appearance. Working extensively in customer service and sales positions, this is almost alway a factor in the hiring process. As it is with many non-profit grassroots organizations, whoever can be successful and have a positive impact on the organization is warmly welcomed to help the movement. Having a diverse staff, specifically with sex and sexual orientation helps to round out the issue and draw attention to the fact that reproductive choice is something that affects far more than just women and is simply a matter of human rights rather than something heterosexual women are fighting on their own.

Blog #3

I'm currently working as a soda jerk at a pharmacy. My job behind the counter is to serve coffee, ice-cream, etc, answer phones, ring up sales, and talk to the customers. I feel like I'm treated professionally by my employers, but I face a lot of inappropriate comments from my customers. On mornings, I serve the "regular" crowd. These people come in every day, so the soda fountain is more "theirs" than mine, and they often times feel way too comfortable talking to me. I'm the only one behind the counter, so I'm basically on display, and the regulars have no problem telling me what they think about me. The women will do it to both male and female soda jerks, telling us they think we're cute or wanting to know if we have a boyfriend or not. The men, however, go way too far. I've dealt with sexual harassment from the morning crowd on at least 3 occasions. It's just really scary that they think making remarks about your body, or coming onto a minor is okay in any circumstance, much less in a professional environment. What's even weirder is that when this kind of thing happens, everyone hears it, but no one stands up for me or calls out whoever is being inappropriate. Some of the women will approach me later and whisper that , "some guys are just dirty," and I'm left in a compromising position, where handling the situation myself would mean doing it in front of an audience.

I've brought these problems up with my boss, and it's been taken care of, but I'm still working mornings in front of people who grew up with completely different standards of how to treat women. Even some of my coworkers have eluded to keeping me at the fountain (instead of working in the pharmacy) because I'm "cute" and a "fountain sweetie." It's hard to do my job well when it feels like my gender and my image are being employed rather than my skill as a worker.

Gender in the Work Place

For the past two summers I have worked at a summer camp as a camp counselor. My specialty is working with kids from the ages of 3-5. I realized that while at the job, the amount of women were larger than the amount of men. It occurred to me that childcare is traditionally a “woman’s? job. Not only did that surprise me, but most of the men were put with the older age groups. One of my guy friends had even gone to talk to our supervisor about getting placed with the younger kids. Even though he really loved working with the 3-5 age groups, he was placed with the older kids. In my opinion, people should work with the age group they are most comfortable with. In the end, it will benefit the children.

Workplace Experience

The very first job I had was at Target. I didn't think that race would be a factor in working there since it was such a big corporation, but I was wrong. Not long after I started work, there were co-workers that had talked to the managers saying that they didn't think I should be working there because I was a minority and I looked like a person that would steal from the company. Ignoring the comments I just continued to work and doing what I needed to do. I also saw a lot of favoritism towards the women who worked there because the men working did the harder work as the women just stood around conversing when there were things to do. A few weeks later, they thought an Asian male employee had stolen some things from the store and automatically the fingers began pointing. The managers interrogated every Asian male that worked at the store threatening to terminate if we didn't confess. I felt very insulted that the situation was directed towards us, so said that I told them I was going to put in my two weeks. They then assumed that I had been the one who stole the things, later to find out it was a Hispanic male who did it.

My Gender in the Workplace

I have always thought that my gender and race did not affect me in the work place. But as I thought about it I realized that it has. I have held two very traditionally female roles in the work place. I have worked at a nursing home for over 2 years. I feel that my gender played a role in my hiring. Very few boys work in my position as a server in th kitchen and in the nursing home altogether. Taking care of the elderly is a traditionally female role. I think that is why being hired was very easy. It was the same case when I was hired at the day care. There is not one male employed in the day care I worked at. It was another traditional female role. I took care of infants and toddlers. I fed them, played with them, changed diapers, and comforted the children. It is a gender norm in most cultures for women to take care of the children as they are expected to take care of the elderly. I was happy with the pays that I received but I do not think someone who is trying to live off of it could do so easily. It was good pay for a high school job. I do not know how my race has affected me exactly but I probably have been affected by it. In the nursing home there is a variety of ethinicities and races from through out the world that are employed, though. Both my jobs though were mostly staffed by whites but I did grow up in the suburbs where it is less racially diverse. I do not feel as though I have been discriminated against directly in either of my jobs. My gender as a whole has been, though.

Blog #3

Personally the only experiences I have had in the work place reflecting any sort of discrimination, have targeted my age and gender. Being a younger female at one particular job I was often talked down upon and given the “shit? jobs (as they are often referred). I frequently find it difficult to be taken seriously firstly as a female and secondly because of an age difference among other employees/colleagues. Obviously with time the age bias with improve with time. On the other hand I am unsure of the gender issue in the workplace. Then again this problem will depend entirely upon the area of work I choose to have a career in. I am sure I will find some occupations to be more intolerant than others.

Continue reading "Blog #3" »

Amy the Bartender

Two summers ago I worked in a cheap (shady) neighborhood bar four days a week from 11:00am to 6:00pm. The clientèle was entirely blue collar workers who lived and/or worked in the area and I knew them all. If I saw them coming I'd have their drink on the bar before they even walked in the door. The two other bartenders that worked at the bar were guys and had a good camaraderie with the regulars but I was the only one with boobs. When I came in for the interview all the guys at the bar demanded that the owner hire me immediately. They would bring their friends in to meet me. I got great tips. In some ways it was very much to my advantage to be a young girl in that environment, I was the center of attention. However, I also bore the blunt of their testosterone-powered conversations and jokes. They would bet on what kind of underwear I was wearing. For the most part I took it good-naturedly and never felt particularly threatened. Mostly it was the people who would come in off the street and wait around until I was done with work that made me nervous. To their credit, though, all the regulars were extremely protective of me and I knew I could count on them to defend me if it came down to it. I was like their pet - for better or worse. On one of my last shifts I wound up in an interesting situation purely because of my gender. Two youngish guys had come in and were shocked to find an even younger girl behind the bar. They immediately started hitting on me and vowed not to leave until I'd promised to go on dates with them. On one hand, they spent tons of money and tipped phenomenally. On the other hand, they started to piss off the regulars and got more and more obnoxious, loud, and insistent as drunks have a tendency to do. An argument broke out between them and some of the regulars and they started to get into each others' faces. They were moments from throwing blows and I was the only person working at the time. I did the only thing I could and jumped between them, praying they were the type of guys that thought it was wrong to hit a girl. They backed off a little bit and some of the regulars stepped in to help calm things down. I chided them sweetly and flirted with the young guys to get them back to their barstools but inside I was shaking. Part of me was glad I was a girl at that moment because I'd been able to diffuse the situation with "feminine wiles" but I also realized just how physically powerless I was. I got lucky that time but the situation could have turned out a lot worse. The bar patrons were not in the least bit threatened by me and "behaved" just to placate me, I had no control over them whatsoever. I wound up getting fired the next week (I'm not exactly sure why) so it stopped being an issue but I'll always remember that sudden realization that they were playing with me. The situation I thought I had been controlling by virtue of my gender was actually made more volatile because I was female and I had no real power in that environment.

Blog 3

I have only had on job in my life and that is working as U of M custodian. I figured that this would be an easy job because they work around my school hours. Also, this was a cleaning job and that was something that I have been doing my entire life. This plays into gender, race and ethnicity because in the world we live in a woman is supposed to be the homemaker. She is supposed to cook, clean, take care of the kids as well as her husband, even though he does much of nothing in the household, multitasking entire days away.

Continue reading "Blog 3" »

Blog #3

Being a Black Man that was born and raised in Queens, New York, I feel like I can easily be stereo-typed in the work place. I've worked a number of jobs and have had many different bosses, both black and white, and I can tell the difference of when i'm being used to my potential and when i'm being stereo-typed because of my skin color.

Continue reading "Blog #3" »

Blog #3

Starting part-time work in a small town didn’t really give me a lot of experience in having things like gender, race, disabilities, etc. affect my employment, however, the local Dairy Queen I worked at only hired females. The owners had bad experiences in the past having males and females in the work place, and ultimately decided they enjoyed an all female work force much better. There are laws against this kind of treatment, but the town is so small nobody really cares and the males usually congregate as customers because the girls work there. So, I was definitely at an advantage being a female when I applied for employment there.

Continue reading "Blog #3" »

Sometimes I wonder why

Sometimes I wonder why things are the way they are. Sometimes I wonder why you don't like and I don't like me and I don't like you. My first job was with The United Parcel Services (UPS). It took me eight months just to get the job. During those eight months, I have applied to jobs like Target, McDonalds, Burger King, K-Mart, Super K, you name it, I was there. For one they tell you that they give you a call in week or so. It turns out that they never give you a call in a week. And when you finally give them a call, they tell you 'Oh we found someone to take that position.' So you mean to tell me that I wasted my time coming to this place looking for a job.
Then sometimes I ask myself, why do I see a sixty-five year old working here at McDonalds? You should be a manager at that age. Not the person taking orders. Right now I am working with the University Dinning Services and I already want to quit. I dont want to see myself at the age of 25 working at a fast food restaurant unless I am the boss. Back in October, I got a job with UPS. One of my managers was apparently racist. He did what ever he could to send me home. I went on my break and this man had the nerve to load a box into the truck. The box did not belong there. When I got back, I continued loading boxes onto the truck. Five minutes later, the man had the nerve to stop me from doing what I was doing and told me to leave. And if that wasn't bad enough, get this, UPS fired me over a key chain. Check this out, they said that the key that I had was considered a weapon because it would blind somebody due to its gold surface. Society is becoming worst these days. And only thrity-three percent of people in the United States will be in the work by the year 2020 as Bill Gates stated in the Oprah Winfrey show. {10/18/05}

BLOG 3

Throughout my senior year in high school, I worked at an Italian restaurant as a hostess. My job was to welcome people and have them feel comfortable. I enjoyed working there because meeting people is always interesting and I was nevert discriminated against my race since I am a white. However, my coworkers, who weren’t white, were mistreated and verbally abused several times.


Continue reading "BLOG 3" »

October 21, 2007

Differences in the Workplace

I have not had many jobs in my life thus far, but one job that sticks out when I think about how my differences affect the experiences I have had was being a camp counselor.

Continue reading "Differences in the Workplace" »

blog 3

I never had a job in my life. I’m going to talk about my mother’s work experience, instead of talking about mine. My mother was a secretary in the company. She worked there for 5 years. She worked as a secretary for the executive director of the company. What she had to do was taking a phone call, getting a message, greeting, and setting up appointments. She had to make her boss coffee in the morning, and whenever the boss’s guest comes. The society portrays mainly woman as a secretary. For the most of the time, people in the higher places are men. In fact, working as a secretary was the women’s dream job at the time. The society would have a soap opera with main woman character has a job as a secretary. Even though, it has nothing to do with gender. Men can make coffee, greet, and get a phone call too. When my mother had job, only men had a chance of promotion. My mother was working, but she didn’t have anything to accomplish. Often, guys from work would treat her like their maid. They would make her bring some coffee for them and making a bad sexual jokes. She told me that if she was educated little more, she would have been higher position than being secretary. Her goal for her children is helping them to finish college. She believes that if one is well educated and have more knowledge of the profession, the one will have promotion no matter what gender, or race you are..

BLOG 3

Throughout my senior year in high school, I worked at an Italian restaurant as a hostess. My job was to welcome people and make them feel comfortable. I enjoyed working there because meeting people is always interesting and I wasn’t discriminated against my race because I am a white. However, my coworkers who weren’t white were mistreated and verbally abused.

Continue reading "BLOG 3" »

Blog #3

I haven’t noticed or had many problems with in the work place. I have held three various jobs since the age of 15 and have experienced effects on promotions, my pay, and treatments within the workplace all related to or affected by my gender. The differences weren’t of great variation but they were enough to be noticed.

Continue reading "Blog #3" »

BLOG 3

During the past summer, I held my first job in a hardware store in St Paul. I was in charge of organizing tools and helping people to find special utensils. I thought it would be an excellent start to know what working feels like in the real world, besides babysitting, which was exceedingly different in many aspects. It was a great experience that taught me life lessons from which I grew stronger and independent as a Lebanese young girl with an accent.

Continue reading "BLOG 3" »

Blog #3

Being what I'd like to think as a "normal" American teenager, I've had a number of jobs which I had hoped would help me assert my independence from my overbearing parents. These "avenues toward freedom" included my first job as a Target cashier, my brief stint as a hostess/waitress at an exclusive golf club and, most recently, my position as a nanny/childcare provider.

Continue reading "Blog #3" »

how who you are affects your experience in the workplace

Olive Garden- Hostess, majority stereotype is female position. Low pay attracts mostly minority. Mexican worked in the kitchen and as bus-boys.
Vector Marketing- recruits college students. try to get a blend of people to reach and sell to all groups of people and cultures. The young gains business and life skills.
University Dining Services- student positions, eat free, understand student's need to take time off for school work.

Blog #3

I work in a customer service job in Downtown Minneapolis; I feel that I am occasionally discriminated against because I am a young woman. Men have approached me and asked me inappropriate questions, such as when I get off work, which makes me extremely uncomfortable and is a difficult question to avoid answering without upsetting the person. Also, men have on occasion targeted me because they feel I am naïve, they have asked me for change and tried to get more money than they have given me. On both these occasions I am sure that they would not have approached me if I had been a man. Otherwise, I have never felt discrimination within my job by co-workers or in the tasks I am expected to perform.

Blog #3

For the most part, I have been very lucky in the jobs I've held because I have never experienced discrimination of any kind. I have held numerous jobs since I entered the workforce at the age of 16 and have enjoyed each of them.

However, gender roles and stereotypes really came into play at one of the jobs I held when I was 17 years old. In high school, I worked at a clothing store at a mall where sales associates were implicitly expected to dress based on typical gender stereotypes. Most of the male workers wore jeans and t-shirts and the females often wore skirts or tight jeans with tank tops or t-shirts. Although our managers never verbally explained that this is what we were expected to wear to work, everyone dressed this way. It was just part of the culture and environment at this particular clothing store. Even in the dead of winter (and keep in mind this was in Minnesota), many female workers came to work dressed in short jean skirts with leggings and skimpy tops.

Also at this job, males worked on the side of the store that sold male clothing and females worked on the side of the store that sold female clothing. Besides cashiers, everyone else worked with the clothes marketed to their gender and with the people that bought them. The only time I ever worked on the side of the store that sold clothes for young men was when two of male co-workers didn't show up to work that day.

Blog #3

My experiences in the workplace have from time to time been centered around gender. While working as a Certified Nursing Aid (CNA), I was at times asked to do tasks which men ‘weren’t able to perform’. These tasks, most of the time, would consist of helping a resident who refuses male-aid care or the aid would refuse to work with the resident because of past episodes of the resident being combative.

Continue reading "Blog #3" »

Blog 3: Finding a Job

I have yet to work but my dad has always told me stories about working and what it was like for him. He told me that when he was first looking for job and sending out applications it was difficult to find. He said he was rejected from one job to the other and later found out the job went to another guy who was not deserving of it. He attributed this to his race and suggested that it was because he was a minority. When he did find a job, he was grateful for it.

Continue reading "Blog 3: Finding a Job" »

Being a Girl at Work

Looking at gender, race, ethnicity, or disability in the workplace, the only example I have of my differences affecting my experiences is because of my gender. I have worked at Windmill Marina on the St Croix River in Afton for the past five summers. It is a great summer job with some strict separations of genders. Here is how it went; the girls worked the gas dock, in the office, and collected launch money while the boys worked in the yard doing maintenance, landscaping, etc and in the lot driving golf carts directing traffic and parking boat trailers. Some of the girls felt they could “handle? the work in the yard, including myself. We felt discriminated against that just because we are girls we cannot do “man’s work.?


Continue reading "Being a Girl at Work" »

Blog #3

Two summers ago I worked as a camp counselor at a science camp where the majority of my coworkers were male. This could potentially be because of the stereotype that science is a male dominated subject in our society, even though women now are becoming involved in science in increasing numbers. I worked with four men, my boss, Justin, and three teenage coworkers, Michael, Hans, and Jesse. There was one other girl, Annika, and we bonded immediately over being in the minority, even though she was six years older than me. Hans, Jesse, Michael, and I were all close in age, so I spent the majority of the time with them. At first it was strange to be one of the only girls, especially since a lot of the campers were also male.
When I first started at the camp, I didn’t know much about the equipment I had to use or the projects the kids had to do. The guys had to show me how to do almost everything, and would sometimes make fun of me, even though it was all in good fun. One interesting thing I noticed was that anytime a kid had a problem, like homesickness, feeling sick, or upset with another kid, they would either come straight to me or Annika, or one of the guys would send them to talk to one of us. Annika and I decided it was probably because we were girls that the guys assumed that we would better know how to deal with emotional problems and help calm the kids down.
Because it was my first year at the camp, I earned almost a dollar less an hour than everybody else. Experience played a role in determining wages at my camp, but gender did not seem to have an impact, as Annika earned as much as Michael, Hans, and Jesse. I faced no discrimination because of my gender, but I defiantly saw differences between Annika and I, as the only female counselors, and Michael, Justin, Jesse, and Hans. Overall, my job at the camp was a lot of fun, and I learned a lot about power tools and science, two male-dominated areas of interest.

Blog 3

The only job I have had so far has been working in the medical records department at a hospital. I do not feel that I was discriminated against for my race or ethnicity, but I think other factors such as my age and gender affected my experience in the workplace. As a female, I think that the tasks I was asked to accomplish were ones that are probably more likely for a female to do than a male. My job was very secretarial; mainly I sorted and filed papers. Probably because of my age I was not given much responsibility beyond this. I don't think I was asked to do these tasks becuase of my gender, but I did notice that very few men worked in this department and most of those who did held higher positions in the workplace, such as management positions. I thought it was interesting that most of the workers were women, and that many of their jobs consisted of answering phones and dealing with paperwork. Again, I don't believe they were in these jobs just becuase they were female. I think it is more likely that many of them didn't go to college so that is why they did not have higher positions. Overall I do not think my age or gender had a negative impact on my experience; I was getting paid ten dollars an hour which is pretty good, and I was only an intern with no previous work experience so it is understandable that I was assigned to do these tasks.

October 20, 2007

Blog 3 My experience

My experiences as a women, a black woman in this day and age has not been as difficult. My race has made some people think of me as a "bitter" black woman because of the way that some black women act. Sometimes I am classified as being a black woman who will use anger to the third degree to get my point across. It bothers me that some people think that just because I'm black that I have a attitude or that I give off a negative vibe making most of my friends black people.

When I apply for jobs I usually don't have a hard time getting one, but lately I have been offered jobs taking care of other peoples children and working some kind of labor that would clearly be too hard for me because of my pregnancy. I applied at banks and other professional facilities. I also have the qualifications to work at these places, but I have not been able to land a job. I believe my pregnancy has something to do with it which is discrimination, but at the same time I feel that some employers may feel that I don't have the qualifications, they are sadly mistakened.

I sometimes get offended at peoples reactions when they find out that I am part Japanese. I called names like "blackanese" and little wonton. Although sometimes I laugh with some people that I know but at the same time I feel bad when people act over excited to know that I'm not just full black. I look black and put that down on paper but its a shame that I sometimes keep my japanese side quiet so that I don't offensive remarks or reactions.

To be a woman period has been a experience. When I found out I was pregnant a lot of people instantly thought that I would be needing resources and welfare to support myself. Just because I am a women doesn't mean that I'm not capable of providing for myself and my child. People also made the assumption that I was not married and didn't have someone to play the father role to my child; wrong again! I get really upset when people see a non-white pregnant women and automatically look at their left hand to see if they are wearing a wedding band. I did not get married to prove a point to anyone, but to set an example that women of color can be pregnant, marriedm, and happy in their marriages.

Some people try to make me feel like I have a disability because I am pregnant. I get treated as if I should be floating instead of walking or that I was a bad decision for me to attend school because I wouldn't be able to handle the stress of being a college student. This semester I have been more focused and more willing to attend every class so that my child can live a comfortable life with educated parents. If anything my pregnancy has gained me more respect for others. There are sometimes were people are judgemental and not considerate of me, but I'm going to school for my son and myself and that to me is not a form of disability.

Overall I could have grew up in those days were blacks were seen less than human, women were objectified worse than now, and jobs were not available. I have had some negative experiences and postive ones, but nothing compares to what the women before me had to undergo and fight against and for that I am grateful; striving to become a woman paving the way for another strong woman to come up.

October 19, 2007

Blog #3-My experiences

My gender, race, and age have all affected my experience in the workplace. For my first job, in a pizza place, I was discriminated against because of my age. I was paid a lower amount because I was under the age of eighteen. I know that the discrimination had nothing to do with gender because I was paid the same wage as my male coworkers who were also under eighteen. Our coworkers who were over eighteen, however, received a dollar more per hour. In this same job, I also was given privilege because of my gender. I was the only female working at the pizza shop and because of this, I was expected to take on and complete easier tasks that the males. I easily fulfilled what was expected of me so when I asked for a raise, I was rewarded.

Continue reading "Blog #3-My experiences" »

Blog #3

The only way that I have been affected by is while working at my last job, I learned from one of my managers that he was unable to get a promotion to a higher status because of the color of his skin. He was Asian and he was very god at what he did, although he was unable to get promoted, all the employees treated him as if he were the store manager. I learned that he had been passed over by another manager because she was white and the district manager liked her more. Not to say that the district manager is racist, but every time the Asian manager brought up the subject of getting promoted, he was always shut down, or pushed to the side. He finally learned the truth when the store manager quit because she was being treated unfairly. This affects me because, I realize that because of my skin color I will have to work harder than most people to get noticed and to get promotions.

Other than that incident my only other experience is while carrying large boxes, guys tend to come help because they think that because I’m a girl that I can’t handle something like that myself. So it was kind of difficult to do my job because they were always in the way with trying to help me, when I didn’t need them.

Blog 3

For over 2 and a half years I have worked at the same job (though I transferred stores when I moved here to Minneapolis last January), and have seen many many occurrences of thins, be them positive or negative, happen on account of people's or my own gender, race, or class. The most prominent of these happens to involve gender, as it is an incredibly physically demanding job. On my very first day at work, my boss looked at me and immediately said "train her to do softlines," which is dealing with the clothes, I knew why right off the bat. I'm a girl, and a rather petite one, so he, more than likely, figured that I would be unable to work with the "heavier," or more difficult tasks. In weeks to come they trained me in the other areas of the store, and from then on, I hardly worked on softlines. I'm definitely the type of person that thinks "oh yeah? Watch me," when I know that people think I will be unable to complete a task, especially based on my gender.
After this occurrence, eventhough I had proved myself time and time again, I've continued to see similar things happen. I've been carrying heavy boxes throughout the store and had them actually taken directly from my hands by my male coworkers, as a gesture of "kindness," because they believe that I can't do such things, despite the fact that seconds before I clearly was. However, the worst of these things that I often see is what my fellow female coworkers do to themselves. As a supervisor now, I often ask women to complete tasks that I know that they are fully capable of doing, but they will staunchly refuse and say "that's man's work!" Every time I am driven to near insanity, and never do I allow them to get away with it. These women don't care how much they're perpetuating what the men already think, and that is something that truly upsets me.
Race comes into play a lot at my work as well, as I happen to work for a company that prides itself on its diversity. Before, I lived in North Dakota, and it is basically white as far as the eye can see, so it was a bit of a culture shock for me to move to the cities, though I thoroughly love it. In the breakroom we'll hear English, Spanish, Somali, Ethiopian, etc, and it is highly fascinating for someone who grew up so removed from such things. However, there are many issues because of this on a regular basis as well. Many of my team members will get angry if they are forced to work with certain races, we often have issues because this particular race thinks this other race is lazy, and that race thinks that other race is mean, and it is always very childish, but hard for me to put a stop to.
I feel I am lucky to work for a company that does embrace diversity very well, and has never had any issues with equal pay for the genders and what not, unlike our counterpart Wal-Mart, where I've actually known many females who have been shorted on their wages because of their gender. It's also a company where any hint of discrimination is absolutely not tolerated, and I've seen people get fired immediately for making racist statements. For the most part, I feel very safe and secure at my job, and I am very thankful for such things, as I know many women do not have such luxury.

October 18, 2007

Blog 3

I have never actually had a "job" but I have volunteered at the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin (ARCW) for a couple summers. I put in up to 30 hours a week so it was like having a job, I just didn't get paid. However, I can't say that gender, race, ethnicity, disability, or any other factor affected my work.

Continue reading "Blog 3" »

Blog 3

I worked at a grocery store a few summers ago, and this past summer I worked in a childcare center. I think my gender and race has had some effect on the jobs I've had, but in a much more indirect and less obvious way. I haven't ever been harassed for being female and I don't feel any of the jobs I've had were easier to acquire because I'm white.

Continue reading "Blog 3" »

Blog 3

Back in my hometown, I worked 40 to 50 hour weeks at American Crystal Sugar every summer after classes ended. As a "beet seed technician" I would help out with test trials in plots scattered all over North Dakota and Minnesota, and I worked alongside a group of Hispanic migrant workers who traveled up from Texas every year for the summer. Despite the fact that we (the migrant workers and I) were paid the same amount, had approximately the same level of education, and occasionally rode to the fields in the same van, our job responsibilities were never of the same variety. The white scientists in charge did not think it appropriate that I be on my hands and knees thinning sugar beets or pulling doubles with the migrant workers, and consequently they usually had me do more crucial scientific work such as emergence counting and rating, even when I repeatedly volunteered myself to fill in for absent members of the other crew.

Continue reading "Blog 3" »

Blog 3

I have been working at my job for several years and generally have not been treated differently from any other workers. I am the leader of my shift, which means that I am responsible for training new workers and answering any questions that my crew may have. This past summer, I trained Dave and he joined my crew. I noticed that after that first day of training, he interacted with me very little. If he had a question, he asked our coworker Bob. He also could never seem to remember my name (even though I wear a nametag). I think that, although I was in charge, Dave trusted Bob because he is a man that thus "should" be in charge. Also, both Dave and Bob are older than I am. Since Bob is older, I think that Dave had an easier time seeing him as an authority figure. This is the only real discrimination I have received at work, and it is very minor. Dave is a very nice man and I am sure his behavior was not intentional. Had this occured several decades ago, I would probably not be the leader of my crew in the first place, and my male coworkers would probably not respect me nearly as much as they do.

October 17, 2007

Blog #3

I haven't been directly affected by discrimination in the workplace due to gender, but I have seen it in play. Last summer I worked at a daycare in the schools and 10 out of the 11 people who worked there were female. The ratio was extremely close to this at all the other school sites also. Childcare is typically seen as a female profession and even with all the stay at home dads these days, this stereotype seems to persist. The large majority of my male friends worked in a construction field and told me they hardly ever worked with any females. I also worked at a grocery store for a few years and there, females were almost always cashiers, and males were almost always baggers. Girls were seen as friendlier and more customer oriented whereas boys were supposed to be the 'brawn' of the operation. There was an unwritten rule that if there was anything heavy on the bottom of the cart such as a 24 pack of pop, the male bagger was supposed to assist the female cashier in lifting and scanning it. I found it completely ludicrous that these little 100-pound, 16 year old boys felt it was their duty to 'help' me lift things when I was half a foot taller than them and perfectly capable of doing it myself. Males and females are supposed to be equal in the workplace, and while I think this idea has improved slightly over the last 20 years, gender roles undoubtedly still exist. Women are still struggling with century old cultural perceptions of themselves and their duties. As long as these persist, women are going to keep encountering challenges such as the "glass ceiling," which we must keep fighting against.